Today in History: Feb. 16

Today is Saturday, Feb. 16, the 47th day of 2019.

Prince George's County Fire/EMS is launching a new program to provide frequent 911 callers with more healthcare options and free up emergency responders. (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
On Feb. 16, 1968, the nation’s first 911 emergency telephone system was inaugurated in Haleyville, Alabama, as the speaker of the Alabama House, Rankin Fite, placed a call from the mayor’s office in City Hall to a red telephone at the police station (also located in City Hall) that was answered by U.S. Rep. Tom Bevill. (Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/Bojan89)
Firemen climb through the wreckage of the burned MARC commuter train in Silver Spring, Md. Saturday Feb. 17, 1996 that was hit by  an Amtrak train  Friday evening. At least 11 passengers on the commuter train were killed.   (AP Photo/Ruth Fremson)
Firemen climb through the wreckage of the burned MARC commuter train in Silver Spring, Md. Saturday Feb. 17, 1996 that was hit by an Amtrak train Feb. 16, 1996. At least 11 passengers on the commuter train were killed. (AP Photo/Ruth Fremson) (Associated Press/RUTH FREMSON)
Fidel Castro, at right,  speaking just after he took office as new Cuban leader during  a television  speech, with Cuban President Manuel Urrutia left on Feb. 16, 1959. (AP Photo)
Fidel Castro, at right, speaking just after he took office as new Cuban leader during a television speech, with Cuban President Manuel Urrutia left on Feb. 16, 1959. (AP Photo) (AP/NC)
On this date in 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, New York, at age 63. (AP Photo)
In 1862, the Civil War Battle of Fort Donelson in Tennessee ended as some 12,000 Confederate soldiers surrendered; Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s victory earned him the moniker “Unconditional Surrender Grant.” On this date in 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, New York, at age 63. (AP Photo) (AP)
Charla Nash
In 2009, in Stamford, Conn., a 200-pound chimpanzee named Travis went berserk, severely mauling its owner’s friend, Charla Nash; Travis was shot dead by police. In this Friday, Feb. 20, 2015 photograph, Charla Nash smiles as her care worker washes her face at her apartment in Boston. The Department of Defense is following Nash’s progress, after funding her transplant surgery in 2011. Nash lost her face, eyes and hands after being mauled by a chimpanzee in 2009. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) (AP)
In this photo made Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2009, the NBC logo and peacock are shown in New York. While regulators may not block Comcast Corp.'s plans to take control of NBC Universal altogether, they will almost certainly require substantial concessions to protect competitors from a company that would own an abundance of popular programming along with the cable lines to roughly a quarter of all U.S. households that pay for TV. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In 1948, N-B-C T-V began airing its first nightly newscast, “The Camel Newsreel Theatre,” which consisted of Fox Movietone newsreels. In this photo made Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2009, the NBC logo and peacock are shown in New York. While regulators may not block Comcast Corp.’s plans to take control of NBC Universal altogether, they will almost certainly require substantial concessions to protect competitors from a company that would own an abundance of popular programming along with the cable lines to roughly a quarter of all U.S. households that pay for TV. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Mark Lennihan)
According to the U.S. Army, U.S. Prisoners of War emplace a mountain gun under Japanese guard on the south shore of Corregidor, Philippines. This undated photo was captured from the Japanese during World War II. (AP Photo)
In 1945, American troops landed on the island of Corregidor in the Philippines during World War II. According to the U.S. Army, U.S. Prisoners of War emplace a mountain gun under Japanese guard on the south shore of Corregidor, Philippines. This undated photo was captured from the Japanese during World War II. (AP Photo) (Associated Press)
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Prince George's County Fire/EMS is launching a new program to provide frequent 911 callers with more healthcare options and free up emergency responders. (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
Firemen climb through the wreckage of the burned MARC commuter train in Silver Spring, Md. Saturday Feb. 17, 1996 that was hit by  an Amtrak train  Friday evening. At least 11 passengers on the commuter train were killed.   (AP Photo/Ruth Fremson)
Fidel Castro, at right,  speaking just after he took office as new Cuban leader during  a television  speech, with Cuban President Manuel Urrutia left on Feb. 16, 1959. (AP Photo)
On this date in 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, New York, at age 63. (AP Photo)
Charla Nash
In this photo made Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2009, the NBC logo and peacock are shown in New York. While regulators may not block Comcast Corp.'s plans to take control of NBC Universal altogether, they will almost certainly require substantial concessions to protect competitors from a company that would own an abundance of popular programming along with the cable lines to roughly a quarter of all U.S. households that pay for TV. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
According to the U.S. Army, U.S. Prisoners of War emplace a mountain gun under Japanese guard on the south shore of Corregidor, Philippines. This undated photo was captured from the Japanese during World War II. (AP Photo)

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Feb. 16, 1959, Fidel Castro became premier of Cuba a month and a-half after the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista.

On this date:

In 1804, Lt. Stephen Decatur led a successful raid into Tripoli Harbor to burn the U.S. Navy frigate Philadelphia, which had fallen into the hands of pirates during the First Barbary War.

In 1862, the Civil War Battle of Fort Donelson in Tennessee ended as some 12,000 Confederate soldiers surrendered; Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s victory earned him the moniker “Unconditional Surrender Grant.”

In 1868, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks was organized in New York City.

In 1945, American troops landed on the island of Corregidor in the Philippines during World War II.

In 1948, N-B-C T-V began airing its first nightly newscast, “The Camel Newsreel Theatre,” which consisted of Fox Movietone newsreels.

In 1961, the United States launched the Explorer 9 satellite.

In 1968, the nation’s first 911 emergency telephone system was inaugurated in Haleyville, Alabama, as the speaker of the Alabama House, Rankin Fite, placed a call from the mayor’s office in City Hall to a red telephone at the police station (also located in City Hall) that was answered by U.S. Rep. Tom Bevill.

In 1988, seven people were shot to death during an office rampage in Sunnyvale, California, by a man obsessed with a co-worker who was wounded in the attack. (The gunman is on death row.)

In 1996, eleven people were killed in a fiery collision between an Amtrak passenger train and a Maryland commuter train in Silver Spring, Md.

In 1998, a China Airlines Airbus A300 trying to land in fog near Taipei, Taiwan, crashed, killing all 196 people on board, plus seven on the ground.

In 2001, The United States and Britain staged air strikes against radar stations and air defense command centers in Iraq. President George W. Bush met with Mexican President Vicente Fox on the first foreign trip of Bush’s presidency. Dr. William H. Masters, who with his partner and later wife Virginia Johnson, pioneered research in the field of human sexuality, died in Tucson, Ariz., at age 85.

In 2003, more than 100,000 people demonstrated in the streets of San Francisco to protest a possible U.S. invasion of Iraq.

Ten years ago: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton arrived in Tokyo to begin her first trip abroad as President Barack Obama’s chief diplomat. The government of Pakistan agreed to implement Islamic law in the northwestern region of Malakand in an attempt to pacify a spreading Taliban insurgency. In Stamford, Conn., a 200-pound chimpanzee named Travis went berserk, severely mauling its owner’s friend, Charla Nash; Travis was shot dead by police.

Five years ago: U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, during a visit to Indonesia, called climate change perhaps the “most fearsome” destructive weapon and mocked those who denied its existence or questioned its causes, comparing them to people who insist the earth is flat.

One year ago: In an indictment, special counsel Robert Mueller accused 13 Russians of an elaborate plot to disrupt the 2016 U.S. presidential election with a huge but hidden social media trolling campaign aimed in part at helping Donald Trump. The FBI said it had received a tip in January that the suspect in the Florida school shooting had a “desire to kill” and access to guns, but agents failed to investigate. President Donald Trump visited Florida, where he saw two survivors of the school shooting that left 17 people dead and thanked doctors and nurses who helped the wounded. Stocks closed out their strongest week in five years, and had recovered more than half of the losses from a plunge at the beginning of the month. Former presidential hopeful Mitt Romney officially launched his political comeback attempt, announcing that he was running for the Utah Senate seat that had been held by Republican Orrin Hatch, who chose not to seek re-election. (Romney would be elected in November, handily defeating Democrat Jenny Wilson.)

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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