Today in History: Jan. 28

Henry VIII (1491-1547) on engraving from 1838.
King of England during 1509-1547. Engraved by W.T.Fry after a painting by Holbein.
In 1547, England’s King Henry VIII died; he was succeeded by his 9-year-old son, Edward VI. This image shows a portrait of King Henry VIII (1491 – 1547), engraved in 1838 by W.T.Fry after a painting by Holbein.

2nd July 1945:  Stonemasons working on the piers of a bridge across the Tisung River in Yunnan Province, China, in order to extend the length of the Stilwell Road. The road is being used by the Allied forces as an overland route to bring supplies to the Chinese Army after routing the Japanese.  (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
In 1945, during World War II, Allied supplies began reaching China over the newly reopened Burma Road. In this image, stonemasons work on the piers of a bridge across the Tisung River in Yunnan Province, China, in order to extend the length of the Stilwell Road. The road is being used by the Allied forces as an overland route to bring supplies to the Chinese Army after routing the Japanese. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

American rock singer Elvis Presley (1935 - 1977) serenades a basset hound in a top hat with the song, 'Hound Dog' on the set of 'The Steve Allen Show,' July 1956. (Photo by NBC Television/Getty Images)
In 1956, Elvis Presley made his first national TV appearance on “Stage Show,” a CBS program hosted by Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey. In this image, Elvis serenades a basset hound in a top hat with the song, ‘Hound Dog’ on the set of ‘The Steve Allen Show,’ July 1956. (Photo by NBC Television/Getty Images)

Presidential adviser Dr. Henry Kissinger and Hanoi's Le Duc Tho, left, shake hands after conferring in suburban St. Nom La Breteche, June 12, 1973.  They have yet to finalize their draft accord to tighten the Vietnam peace agreement.  At far right is Le Duc Tho's aide Nguyen Co Thach.  (AP Photo/Michel Lipchitz)
In 1973, a cease-fire officially went into effect in the Vietnam War, a day after the signing of the Paris Peace Accords by the United States, North Vietnam and South Vietnam.

Presidential adviser Dr. Henry Kissinger and Hanoi’s Le Duc Tho, left, shake hands after conferring in suburban St. Nom La Breteche, June 12, 1973. They had yet to finalize their draft accord to tighten the Vietnam peace agreement. At far right is Le Duc Tho’s aide Nguyen Co Thach. (AP Photo/Michel Lipchitz)

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 1979 file photo, students stand guard before the entrance of the United States Embassy where staff is being held hostage in Tehran, as a portrait of Ayatollah Khomeini is on display. The Obama administration asked a federal judge Tuesday, April 21, 2009 to throw out a lawsuit against Iran filed by Americans held hostage at the embassy in Tehran 30 years ago. In court papers filed Tuesday night, the Justice Department argued that the agreement to release the hostages precluded lawsuits against Iran. (AP Photo/File)
In 1980, six U.S. diplomats who had avoided being taken hostage at their embassy in Tehran flew out of Iran with the help of Canadian diplomats.

In this Nov. 6, 1979 file photo, students stand guard before the entrance of the United States Embassy where staff is being held hostage in Tehran, as a portrait of Ayatollah Khomeini is on display. (AP Photo/File)

In 1986, the space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, killing all seven crew members, including schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe.   (AP)
Addam Swapp leaves the federal courthouse in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1998, following his asking for new trials for himself and his brother-in-law. The polygamous clan leader was involved in a Mormon chapel bombing and subsequent 13-day siege a decade ago. Their argument before the court was that the federal government had no jurisdiction in the case. The two are serving lengthy federal prison terms for a variety of convictions. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac)
In 1988, a 13-day standoff in Marion, Utah, between police and a polygamist clan ended in gunfire that killed a state corrections officer, Fred House, and seriously wounded the group’s leader, Addam Swapp, who ended up serving more than 25 years behind bars.

Addam Swapp leaves the federal courthouse in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1998, following his asking for new trials for himself and his brother-in-law. The polygamous clan leader was involved in a Mormon chapel bombing and subsequent 13-day siege a decade ago. Their argument before the court was that the federal government had no jurisdiction in the case. The two are serving lengthy federal prison terms for a variety of convictions. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac)

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Henry VIII (1491-1547) on engraving from 1838.
King of England during 1509-1547. Engraved by W.T.Fry after a painting by Holbein.
2nd July 1945:  Stonemasons working on the piers of a bridge across the Tisung River in Yunnan Province, China, in order to extend the length of the Stilwell Road. The road is being used by the Allied forces as an overland route to bring supplies to the Chinese Army after routing the Japanese.  (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
American rock singer Elvis Presley (1935 - 1977) serenades a basset hound in a top hat with the song, 'Hound Dog' on the set of 'The Steve Allen Show,' July 1956. (Photo by NBC Television/Getty Images)
Presidential adviser Dr. Henry Kissinger and Hanoi's Le Duc Tho, left, shake hands after conferring in suburban St. Nom La Breteche, June 12, 1973.  They have yet to finalize their draft accord to tighten the Vietnam peace agreement.  At far right is Le Duc Tho's aide Nguyen Co Thach.  (AP Photo/Michel Lipchitz)
FILE - In this Nov. 6, 1979 file photo, students stand guard before the entrance of the United States Embassy where staff is being held hostage in Tehran, as a portrait of Ayatollah Khomeini is on display. The Obama administration asked a federal judge Tuesday, April 21, 2009 to throw out a lawsuit against Iran filed by Americans held hostage at the embassy in Tehran 30 years ago. In court papers filed Tuesday night, the Justice Department argued that the agreement to release the hostages precluded lawsuits against Iran. (AP Photo/File)
Addam Swapp leaves the federal courthouse in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1998, following his asking for new trials for himself and his brother-in-law. The polygamous clan leader was involved in a Mormon chapel bombing and subsequent 13-day siege a decade ago. Their argument before the court was that the federal government had no jurisdiction in the case. The two are serving lengthy federal prison terms for a variety of convictions. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac)

Today is Monday, Jan. 28, the 28th day of 2019. There are 337 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Jan. 28, 1986, the space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, killing all seven crew members, including schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe.

On this date:

In 1547, England’s King Henry VIII died; he was succeeded by his 9-year-old son, Edward VI.

In 1878, the first daily college newspaper, Yale News (now Yale Daily News), began publication in New Haven, Connecticut.

In 1911, the notorious Hope Diamond was sold by jeweler Pierre Cartier to socialites Edward and Evalyn McLean of Washington, D.C., for $180,000.

In 1915, the United States Coast Guard was created as President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill merging the Life-Saving Service and Revenue Cutter Service.

In 1916, Louis D. Brandeis was nominated by President Woodrow Wilson to the Supreme Court; Brandeis became the court’s first Jewish member.

In 1945, during World War II, Allied supplies began reaching China over the newly reopened Burma Road.

In 1956, Elvis Presley made his first national TV appearance on “Stage Show,” a CBS program hosted by Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey.

In 1960, the National Football League awarded franchises to Dallas and Minneapolis-St. Paul.

In 1973, a cease-fire officially went into effect in the Vietnam War, a day after the signing of the Paris Peace Accords by the United States, North Vietnam and South Vietnam.

In 1978, fire swept through the historic downtown Coates House hotel in Kansas City, Missouri, killing 20 people.

In 1980, six U.S. diplomats who had avoided being taken hostage at their embassy in Tehran flew out of Iran with the help of Canadian diplomats.

In 1988, a 13-day standoff in Marion, Utah, between police and a polygamist clan ended in gunfire that killed a state corrections officer, Fred House, and seriously wounded the group’s leader, Addam (correct) Swapp, who ended up serving more than 25 years behind bars.

Ten years ago: In a swift victory for President Barack Obama, the Democratic-controlled House approved, 244-188, a huge $819 billion stimulus bill with Republicans unanimous in opposition despite Obama’s pleas for bipartisan support. Lynyrd Skynyrd keyboard player Billy Powell, who survived the 1977 plane crash that killed three band members, died in Orange Park, Fla., at age 56.

Five years ago: Seeking to energize his second term, President Barack Obama vowed in his State of the Union address to sidestep Congress “whenever and wherever” necessary to narrow economic disparities between rich and poor. Ukraine’s prime minister, Mykola Azarov, resigned and the Ukrainian parliament repealed anti-protest laws in back-to-back moves designed to defuse the country’s political crisis.

One year ago: Bruno Mars won all six Grammy awards for which he was nominated, including album of the year for “24K Magic;” the leading nominee, Jay-Z, walked away empty-handed. Roger Federer won his 20th Grand Slam singles title, defeating Marin Cilic in the Australian Open final. Protesters gathered across Russia to support the call from opposition leader Alexei Navalny to boycott the March presidential election; Navalny himself was arrested while walking to the Moscow demonstration.

Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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