Today in History: Jan. 18

This is an undated photo of British poet Rudyard Kipling.   (AP Photo)
In 1936, Nobel Prize-winning author Rudyard Kipling, 70, died in London. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
SAN FRANCISCO - NOVEMBER 21:  A loaf of sliced wheat bread is seen on the shelf at the Noe Valley Bakery and Bread Co. November 21, 2003 in San Francisco, California. The popularity of Atkins-style, low carbohydrate diets has contributed to the drop in consumption of bread in the U.S. over the past year as 40 percent of Americans ate less than in 2002.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)  While industry leaders said The popularity of Atkins-style low-carbohydrate diets hasnt significantly affected sales for most bakers and suppliers, they said the trend may mean new ways of doing business.
On this date in 1943, a U.S. ban on the sale of pre-sliced bread – aimed at reducing bakeries’ demand for metal replacement parts – went into effect. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Justin Sullivan)
Albert DeSalvo, 34-year-old mental patient who says he is the Boston Strangler, arrives at court in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 10, 1967, in police custody for trial on a variety of charges not related to the stranglings.  (AP Photo)
In 1967, Albert DeSalvo, who claimed to be the “Boston Strangler,” was convicted in Cambridge, Massachusetts, of armed robbery, assault and sex offenses. (Sentenced to life, DeSalvo was killed in prison in 1973.) (AP Photo) (AP)
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. makes his last public appearance at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tenn., on April 3, 1968.  The following day King was assassinated on his motel balcony.  (AP Photo/Charles Kelly)
In 1993, the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday was observed in all 50 states for the first time. (AP Photo/Charles Kelly) (AP/CHARLES KELLY)
A replica of Captain James Cook's "Endeavour" leaves Honolulu Harbor Monday, Nov.15, 1999, for Nawiliwili Harbor on Kauai as part of its four-year around-the-world cruise. Cook sailed the "Endeavour" around the world in a famous 1768-71 exploration. He later arrived in Hawaii in 1778 aboard the "Resolution" accompanied by the "Discovery". The replica ship, built in Australia, carries 18 professional seamen and 34 volunteers. (AP Photo/Ronen Zilberman)
In 1778, English navigator Captain James Cook reached the present-day Hawaiian Islands, which he named the “Sandwich Islands.” A replica of Captain James Cook’s “Endeavour” leaves Honolulu Harbor Monday, Nov.15, 1999, for Nawiliwili Harbor on Kauai as part of its four-year around-the-world cruise. Cook sailed the “Endeavour” around the world in a famous 1768-71 exploration. He later arrived in Hawaii in 1778 aboard the “Resolution” accompanied by the “Discovery”. The replica ship, built in Australia, carries 18 professional seamen and 34 volunteers. (AP Photo/Ronen Zilberman) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/RONEN ZILBERMAN)
Sherman Hemsley, Paul Benedict, Damon Evans
In 1975, the situation comedy “The Jeffersons,” a spin-off from “All in the Family,” premiered on CBS-TV. FILE – In this 1977 file photo provided by CBS, from left, Sherman Hemsley, Paul Benedict and Damon Evans star in an episode of “The Jeffersons.” The 1970s series was about a nouveau riche, African-American family who move into a luxury apartment in New York City. (AP Photo/CBS, File) (AP)
AP: 2e3883da-2cf0-4ece-97da-8ee57687c293
In 2005, the world’s largest commercial jet, the Airbus A380 “superjumbo” capable of flying up to 800 passengers, was unveiled in Toulouse, France. The Airbus A380 jet liner prepares to land after performing its demonstration flight on the first day of the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget airport, north of Paris, Monday June 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere) (AP)
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This is an undated photo of British poet Rudyard Kipling.   (AP Photo)
SAN FRANCISCO - NOVEMBER 21:  A loaf of sliced wheat bread is seen on the shelf at the Noe Valley Bakery and Bread Co. November 21, 2003 in San Francisco, California. The popularity of Atkins-style, low carbohydrate diets has contributed to the drop in consumption of bread in the U.S. over the past year as 40 percent of Americans ate less than in 2002.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)  While industry leaders said The popularity of Atkins-style low-carbohydrate diets hasnt significantly affected sales for most bakers and suppliers, they said the trend may mean new ways of doing business.
Albert DeSalvo, 34-year-old mental patient who says he is the Boston Strangler, arrives at court in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 10, 1967, in police custody for trial on a variety of charges not related to the stranglings.  (AP Photo)
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. makes his last public appearance at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tenn., on April 3, 1968.  The following day King was assassinated on his motel balcony.  (AP Photo/Charles Kelly)
A replica of Captain James Cook's "Endeavour" leaves Honolulu Harbor Monday, Nov.15, 1999, for Nawiliwili Harbor on Kauai as part of its four-year around-the-world cruise. Cook sailed the "Endeavour" around the world in a famous 1768-71 exploration. He later arrived in Hawaii in 1778 aboard the "Resolution" accompanied by the "Discovery". The replica ship, built in Australia, carries 18 professional seamen and 34 volunteers. (AP Photo/Ronen Zilberman)
Sherman Hemsley, Paul Benedict, Damon Evans
AP: 2e3883da-2cf0-4ece-97da-8ee57687c293

Today is Friday, Jan. 18, the 18th day of 2019.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On Jan. 18, 1957, a trio of B-52’s completed the first non-stop, round-the-world flight by jet planes, landing at March Air Force Base in California after more than 45 hours aloft.

On this date:

In 1778, English navigator Captain James Cook reached the present-day Hawaiian Islands, which he named the “Sandwich Islands.”

In 1904, actor Cary Grant was born Archibald Leach in Bristol, England.

In 1911, the first landing of an aircraft on a ship took place as pilot Eugene B. Ely brought his Curtiss biplane in for a safe landing on the deck of the armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania in San Francisco Harbor.

In 1919, the Paris Peace Conference, held to negotiate peace treaties ending the First World War, opened in Versailles (vehr-SY’), France.

In 1936, Nobel Prize-winning author Rudyard Kipling, 70, died in London.

In 1943, during World War II, Jewish insurgents in the Warsaw Ghetto launched their initial armed resistance against Nazi troops, who eventually succeeded in crushing the rebellion. The Soviets announced they’d broken through the long Nazi siege of Leningrad (it was another year before the siege was fully lifted). A U.S. ban on the sale of pre-sliced bread _ aimed at reducing bakeries’ demand for metal replacement parts _ went into effect.

In 1967, Albert DeSalvo, who claimed to be the “Boston Strangler,” was convicted of armed robbery, assault and sex offenses. (Sentenced to life, DeSalvo was killed in prison in 1973.)

In 1975, the situation comedy “The Jeffersons,” a spin-off from “All in the Family,” premiered on CBS-TV.

In 1991, financially strapped Eastern Airlines shut down after more than six decades in business.

In 1993, the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday was observed in all 50 states for the first time.

In 2001, President Bill Clinton, in a farewell from the Oval Office, told the nation that America had “done well” during his presidency, with record-breaking prosperity and a cleaner environment.

In 2005, the world’s largest commercial jet, the Airbus A380 “superjumbo” capable of flying up to 800 passengers, was unveiled in Toulouse, France.

Ten years ago: Israeli troops begin to withdraw from Gaza after their government and Hamas militants declared an end to a three-week war. A star-studded pre-inaugural concert took place on the National Mall, featuring Bruce Springsteen, Bono (BAH’-noh) and Beyonce, with President-elect Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, in attendance. The Arizona Cardinals of the NFC advanced to their first Super Bowl with a 32-25 win over the Philadelphia Eagles; the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Baltimore Ravens 23-14 to win the AFC Championship and reach their seventh Super Bowl.

Five years ago: Results showed that nearly 20 million Egyptian voters backed the country’s new constitution, almost double the number of those who’d voted for one drafted in 2012 under the government of toppled Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. “American Hustle” took the Screen Actors Guild Awards’ top honor for outstanding cast; Matthew McConaughey was recognized for his lead performance in “Dallas Buyers Club” while Cate Blanchett won the actress award for “Blue Jasmine.”

One year ago: At the end of a visit to Chile that was meant to heal the wounds of a sex abuse scandal, Pope Francis accused victims of Chile’s most notorious pedophile of slandering another bishop; Francis said he would need to see proof that Bishop Juan Barros was complicit in covering up the sex crimes of the Rev. Fernando Karadima. Texas executed by lethal injection Anthony Allen Shore, who became known as Houston’s “Tourniquet Killer” because of the murder technique used on four female victims. Temperatures peaked at 104 degrees during second-round matches at the Australian Open.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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