Today in History: Dec. 1

On this date in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of January 1, 1863. (AP Photo)
In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln sent his Second Annual Message to Congress, in which he called for the abolition of slavery, and went on to say, “Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history. We of this Congress and this administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves.” (AP Photo) (AP)
A long line of cars waiting to get the last gasoline on their temporary gas rationing cards is seen near the Capitol, July 21, 1942, in Washington.  (AP Photo)
In 1942, nationwide gasoline rationing went into effect in the United States. A long line of cars waiting to get the last gasoline on their temporary gas rationing cards is seen near the Capitol, July 21, 1942, in Washington. (AP Photo) (AP)
ROSA PARKS
In 1955, Rosa Parks, a black seamstress, was arrested after refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Alabama, city bus; the incident sparked a year-long boycott of the buses by blacks. File – This undated file photo shows Parks riding on the Montgomery Area Transit System bus in Montgomery, Ala. (AP Photo/Daily Advertiser, File) (AP)
This is the first of 82 Cuban refugees to arrive from Varadero, Cuba to Miami, Fla., on Dec. 1, 1965.  (AP Photo)
In 1965, an airlift of refugees from Cuba to the United States began in which thousands of Cubans were allowed to leave their homeland. This is the first of 82 Cuban refugees to arrive from Varadero, Cuba to Miami, Fla., on Dec. 1, 1965. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Pope John Paul II shakes hands with Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev in the first ever meeting between a Kremlin chief and a Pontiff, at the Vatican, Friday, Dec. 1, 1989. (AP Photo/Massimo Sambucetti)
In 1989, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev met with Pope John Paul II at the Vatican. (AP Photo/Massimo Sambucetti) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Massimo Sambucetti)
French workers on the French side under the English Channel, Friday, Nov. 30, 1990 prepare for the historic encounter to take place on Saturday when the last wall separating the two halfs of a rail tunnel is knocked away to link England and France. (AP Photo)
In 1990, British and French workers digging the Channel Tunnel between their countries finally met after knocking out a passage in a service tunnel. Here, French workers on the French side under the English Channel, Friday, Nov. 30, 1990 prepare for the historic encounter to take place on Saturday when the last wall separating the two halves of a rail tunnel is knocked away to link England and France. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Mary Joe Buttafuoco arrives carrying her notes on December 1, 1992 at court in Mineola, New York, followed by her attorney Michael Rindenow, left, for the sentencing of Amy Fisher, the Long Island teen who tried to kill her. This is the first time since the May shooting that Buttafuoco has become face-to-face with her assailant, Fisher was sentenced to a five-to-15-year term in the "Teen Attraction" love triangle shooting. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
In 1992, a judge in Mineola, New York, sentenced Amy Fisher to 5 to 15 years in prison for shooting and seriously wounding her lover’s wife, Mary Jo Buttafuoco. (Fisher served seven years.) Mary Joe Buttafuoco arrives carrying her notes on December 1, 1992 at court in Mineola, New York, followed by her attorney Michael Rindenow, left, for the sentencing of Amy Fisher, the Long Island teen who tried to kill her. This is the first time since the May shooting that Buttafuoco has become face-to-face with her assailant, Fisher was sentenced to a five-to-15-year term in the “Teen Attraction” love triangle shooting. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Richard Drew)
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On this date in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of January 1, 1863. (AP Photo)
A long line of cars waiting to get the last gasoline on their temporary gas rationing cards is seen near the Capitol, July 21, 1942, in Washington.  (AP Photo)
ROSA PARKS
This is the first of 82 Cuban refugees to arrive from Varadero, Cuba to Miami, Fla., on Dec. 1, 1965.  (AP Photo)
Pope John Paul II shakes hands with Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev in the first ever meeting between a Kremlin chief and a Pontiff, at the Vatican, Friday, Dec. 1, 1989. (AP Photo/Massimo Sambucetti)
French workers on the French side under the English Channel, Friday, Nov. 30, 1990 prepare for the historic encounter to take place on Saturday when the last wall separating the two halfs of a rail tunnel is knocked away to link England and France. (AP Photo)
Mary Joe Buttafuoco arrives carrying her notes on December 1, 1992 at court in Mineola, New York, followed by her attorney Michael Rindenow, left, for the sentencing of Amy Fisher, the Long Island teen who tried to kill her. This is the first time since the May shooting that Buttafuoco has become face-to-face with her assailant, Fisher was sentenced to a five-to-15-year term in the "Teen Attraction" love triangle shooting. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Today is Saturday, Dec. 1, the 335th day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Dec. 1, 1955, Rosa Parks, a black seamstress, was arrested after refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Alabama, city bus; the incident sparked a year-long boycott of the buses by blacks.

On this date:

In 1824, the presidential election was turned over to the U.S. House of Representatives when a deadlock developed between John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford and Henry Clay. (Adams ended up the winner.)

In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln sent his Second Annual Message to Congress, in which he called for the abolition of slavery, and went on to say, “Fellow-citizens, we can not escape history. We of this Congress and this Administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves.”

In 1941, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito approved waging war against the United States, Britain and the Netherlands after his government rejected U.S. demands contained in the Hull Note.

In 1942, during World War II, nationwide gasoline rationing went into effect in the United States; the goal was not so much to save on gas, but to conserve rubber (as in tires) that was desperately needed for the war effort.

In 1952, the New York Daily News ran a front-page story on Christine Jorgensen’s sex-reassignment surgery with the headline, “Ex-GI Becomes Blonde Beauty”.

In 1965, an airlift of refugees from Cuba to the United States began in which thousands of Cubans were allowed to leave their homeland.

In 1969, the U.S. government held its first draft lottery since World War II.

In 1989, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev met with Pope John Paul II at the Vatican.

In 1990, British and French workers digging the Channel Tunnel between their countries finally met after knocking out a passage in a service tunnel.

In 1992, a judge in Mineola, New York, sentenced Amy Fisher to 5 to 15 years in prison for shooting and seriously wounding her lover’s wife, Mary Jo Buttafuoco (buh-tuh-FYOO’-koh). (Fisher served seven years.)

In 1997, a 14-year-old boy opened fire on a prayer circle at Heath High School in West Paducah, Kentucky, killing three fellow students and wounding five; the shooter is serving a life sentence.

In 2004, Tom Brokaw signed off for the last time as principal anchor of the “N-B-C Nightly News”; he was succeeded by Brian Williams.

Ten years ago: The National Bureau of Economic Research officially declared the U.S. to be in a recession; the Dow industrials lost 679 points to end a five-day win streak. President-elect Barack Obama announced his national security team, including Hillary Rodham Clinton as secretary of state, Eric Holder as attorney general and Janet Napolitano as homeland security secretary; Obama also said that Robert Gates would stay on as defense secretary. Actor Paul Benedict, who played English neighbor Harry Bentley on “The Jeffersons,” died on Martha’s Vineyard, Mass. at age 70.

Five years ago: A New York City commuter train rounding a riverside curve derailed, killing four people and injuring more than 70 (federal regulators later said a sleep-deprived engineer had nodded off at the controls just before taking the 30 mph curve at 82 mph, causing the derailment). Edward J. “Babe” Heffron, 90, whose World War II service as a member of Easy Company was recounted in the book and television miniseries “Band of Brothers,” died in Stratford, New Jersey.

One year ago: Retired general Michael Flynn, who served as President Donald Trump’s first national security adviser, pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about reaching out to the Russians on Trump’s behalf; he said members of the president’s inner circle had, at times, directed his contacts. (Sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 18, 2018.) The president dismissed as “fake news” reports that he wanted to oust Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. (Trump replaced Tillerson with CIA Director Mike Pompeo in March, 2018.)

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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