Today in History: Nov. 20

This is a copy of the cover of the U.S. Constitution.
In 1789, New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill of Rights.   (Getty Images/iStockphoto/giftlegacy)
The British Attorney General Sir Hartley Shawcross speaking at the War Crimes Tribunal at Nuremberg, on Nov. 15, 1945, opposed a possible postponement of the Nuremberg trials. A medical report had been read that Gustav Krupp the munitions magnate was dying and was unlikely to face trial. The British Attorney General Sir Hartley Shawcross, bottom right, is seen addressing the court at Nuremberg. (AP Photo)
In 1945, 22 former Nazi officials went on trial before an international war crimes tribunal in Nuremberg, Germany. Almost a year later, the International Military Tribune sentenced 12 of the defendants to death; seven received prison sentences ranging from 10 years to life; three were acquitted. (AP Photo) (AP)
Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, wave to the crowds from a balcony of Buckingham Palace after their return from Westminster Abbey following their marriage, Nov. 20, 1947. (AP Photo)
In 1947, Britain’s future queen, Princess Elizabeth, married Philip Mountbatten, Duke of Edinburgh, at Westminster Abbey. (AP Photo) (AP)
Part of a band of American Indians look over the main cell block of Alcatraz after occupying the island for the second time in two weeks in San Francisco on Nov. 19, 1969. The Indians say they want the island for a new Indian center to replace a San Francisco building destroyed by fire. The General Service Administration asked the Indians to leave but threatened no immediate action. (AP Photo/RWK)
In 1969, a group of American Indian activists began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay. (AP Photo/RWK) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
An undated photo of Generalissimo Francisco Franco of Spain. (AP Photo/fls)
In 1975, after nearly four decades of absolute rule, Spain’s Generalissimo Francisco Franco died, two weeks before his 83rd birthday. (AP Photo/fls) (AP)
In 1976, the boxing drama "Rocky," a United Artists release starring Sylvester Stallone as a journeyman fighter who's given the chance to face the heavyweight champion, premiered in New York.  (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
In 1976, the boxing drama “Rocky,” a United Artists release starring Sylvester Stallone as a journeyman fighter who’s given the chance to face the heavyweight champion, premiered in New York.   In this file photo, the 8-foot, 6-inch tall statue of movie character “Rocky,” given to the city by actor Sylvester Stallone, stands before the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia in this Feb. 21, 1990, file photo. The city’s Art Commission approved a plan Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2006 to return the statue of the big-screen boxer to a site near the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/AMY SANCETTA)
FILE - In this Aug. 24, 1995, file photo, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates sits on stage during a video portion of the Windows 95 Launch Event  on the company's campus in Redmond, Wash. One of the biggest changes with Windows 8 is the disappearance of the familiar start button at the lower left corner of the screen. There will be a new screen filled with a colorful array of tiles, each leading to a different application, task or collection of files. (AP Photo/File)
In 1985, the first version of Microsoft’s Windows operating system, Windows 1.0, was officially released.   In this Aug. 24, 1995, file photo, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates sits on stage during a video portion of the Windows 95 Launch Event on the company’s campus in Redmond, Wash. One of the biggest changes with Windows 8 is the disappearance of the familiar start button at the lower left corner of the screen. There will be a new screen filled with a colorful array of tiles, each leading to a different application, task or collection of files. (AP Photo/File) (AP)
FILE - In this March 15, 2005 file photo, Pop star Michael Jackson leaves the Santa Barbara County Courthouse with his father, Joe, left, in Santa Maria, Calif., following a day of testimony in Jackson's trial on charges of child molestation. Jackson, 50, died in Los Angeles on Thursday, June 25, 2009. (AP Photo/Michael A. Mariant, file)
In 2003, Michael Jackson was booked on suspicion of child molestation in Santa Barbara, Calif. (Jackson was later acquitted at trial.) In this March 15, 2005 file photo, Pop star Michael Jackson leaves the Santa Barbara County Courthouse with his father, Joe, left, in Santa Maria, Calif., following a day of testimony in Jackson’s trial on charges of child molestation. Jackson, 50, died in Los Angeles on Thursday, June 25, 2009. (AP Photo/Michael A. Mariant, file) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/MICHAEL A. MARIANT)
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This is a copy of the cover of the U.S. Constitution.
The British Attorney General Sir Hartley Shawcross speaking at the War Crimes Tribunal at Nuremberg, on Nov. 15, 1945, opposed a possible postponement of the Nuremberg trials. A medical report had been read that Gustav Krupp the munitions magnate was dying and was unlikely to face trial. The British Attorney General Sir Hartley Shawcross, bottom right, is seen addressing the court at Nuremberg. (AP Photo)
Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, wave to the crowds from a balcony of Buckingham Palace after their return from Westminster Abbey following their marriage, Nov. 20, 1947. (AP Photo)
Part of a band of American Indians look over the main cell block of Alcatraz after occupying the island for the second time in two weeks in San Francisco on Nov. 19, 1969. The Indians say they want the island for a new Indian center to replace a San Francisco building destroyed by fire. The General Service Administration asked the Indians to leave but threatened no immediate action. (AP Photo/RWK)
An undated photo of Generalissimo Francisco Franco of Spain. (AP Photo/fls)
In 1976, the boxing drama "Rocky," a United Artists release starring Sylvester Stallone as a journeyman fighter who's given the chance to face the heavyweight champion, premiered in New York.  (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
FILE - In this Aug. 24, 1995, file photo, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates sits on stage during a video portion of the Windows 95 Launch Event  on the company's campus in Redmond, Wash. One of the biggest changes with Windows 8 is the disappearance of the familiar start button at the lower left corner of the screen. There will be a new screen filled with a colorful array of tiles, each leading to a different application, task or collection of files. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this March 15, 2005 file photo, Pop star Michael Jackson leaves the Santa Barbara County Courthouse with his father, Joe, left, in Santa Maria, Calif., following a day of testimony in Jackson's trial on charges of child molestation. Jackson, 50, died in Los Angeles on Thursday, June 25, 2009. (AP Photo/Michael A. Mariant, file)

Today is Tuesday, Nov. 20, the 324th day of 2018. There are 41 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Nov. 20, 1945, 22 former Nazi officials went on trial before an international war crimes tribunal in Nuremberg, Germany. (Almost a year later, the International Military Tribune sentenced 12 of the defendants to death; seven received prison sentences ranging from 10 years to life; three were acquitted.)

On this date:

In 1789, New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill of Rights.

In 1910, the Mexican Revolution of 1910 had its beginnings under the Plan of San Luis Potosi issued by Francisco I. Madero.

In 1947, Britain’s future queen, Princess Elizabeth, married Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, at Westminster Abbey.

In 1967, the U.S. Census Bureau’s Population Clock at the Commerce Department ticked past 200 million.

In 1969, the Nixon administration announced a halt to residential use of the pesticide DDT as part of a total phaseout. A group of American Indian activists began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay.

In 1975, after nearly four decades of absolute rule, Spain’s Generalissimo Francisco Franco died, two weeks before his 83rd birthday.

In 1976, the boxing drama “Rocky,” starring Sylvester Stallone, premiered in New York.

In 1982, in one of college football’s oddest finales, the University of California used five laterals to score a disputed winning touchdown on the last play of a game against Stanford, 25-20.

In 1985, the first version of Microsoft’s Windows operating system, Windows 1.0, was officially released.

In 1998, forty-six states embraced a $206 billion settlement with cigarette makers over health costs for treating sick smokers.

In 2000, lawyers for Al Gore and George W. Bush battled before the Florida Supreme Court over whether the presidential election recount should be allowed to continue.

In 2003, Michael Jackson was booked on suspicion of child molestation in Santa Barbara, Calif. (Jackson was later acquitted at trial.) Record producer Phil Spector was charged with murder in the shooting death of an actress, Lana Clarkson, at his home in Alhambra, California. (Spector’s first trial ended with a hung jury in 2007; he was convicted of second-degree murder in 2009 and sentenced to 19 years to life in prison.)

Ten years ago: Sen. Ted Stevens, the chamber’s longest-serving Republican, delivered his swan song address following his failed re-election bid; he was saluted by his colleagues as a staunch friend and teacher. The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to impose new sanctions aimed at reducing the arms flowing into Somalia and the lawlessness and piracy that were flourishing there.

Five years ago: Secretary of State John Kerry said the U.S. and Afghanistan had agreed on the language of a bilateral security pact that would clear the way for thousands of U.S troops to train and assist Afghan forces after the NATO combat mission ended in 2014. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation allowing same-sex weddings in his state.

One year ago: President Donald Trump announced that he was designating North Korea, which he called a “murderous regime,” as a state sponsor of terror. CBS News suspended Charlie Rose, and PBS stopped distribution of his nightly interview show, after a Washington Post report carried accusations of sexual misconduct from eight women. Nebraska regulators approved an alternative route for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, the last major regulatory hurdle facing the project’s operator.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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