Today in History: Nov. 12

This is a Nov. 1928 photo of Soviet Premier Josef Stalin in Moscow, Russia.  (AP Photo)
In 1927, Josef Stalin became the undisputed ruler of the Soviet Union as Leon Trotsky was expelled from the Communist Party. This is a Nov. 1928 photo of Stalin in Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo) (AP)
In this Nov. 12, 1936 photo, State Highway policemen cross the western span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge during its opening in San Francisco.  The project cost  $77.6 million. The bridge has been closed indefinitely after a rod installed during last month's emergency repairs snapped, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009, causing a traffic nightmare for the 280,000 motorists who cross the landmark span every day. (AP Photo)
In 1936, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge opened as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a telegraph key in Washington, D.C., giving the green light to traffic. In this Nov. 12, 1936 photo, State Highway policemen cross the western span of the bridge during its opening in San Francisco. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
Crew of U.S. Marines fords a river on Guadalcanal, in the Solomon Islands, to lay a telephone wire on Nov. 12, 1942. They strip down to get the wire across the Longa River to provide speedy military communication. (AP Photo/Pool)
In 1942, the World War II naval Battle of Guadalcanal began. (The Allies ended up winning a major victory over Japanese forces.) Crew of U.S. Marines fords a river on Guadalcanal, in the Solomon Islands, to lay a telephone wire on Nov. 12, 1942. They strip down to get the wire across the Longa River to provide speedy military communication. (AP Photo/Pool) (AP/Anonymous)
Ernest Morial, the first black mayor of New Orleans, reaches down from the platform to shake some hands following his inauguration in New Orleans, May 2, 1978. Morial, former legislator and a judge, succeed Moon Landrieu. (AP Photo)
In 1977, the city of New Orleans elected its first black mayor, Ernest “Dutch” Morial, the winner of a runoff. Ernest Morial, the first black mayor of New Orleans, reaches down from the platform to shake some hands following his inauguration in New Orleans, May 2, 1978. Morial, former legislator and a judge, succeed Moon Landrieu. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
Chicago police officers, wearing rubber gloves, arrest a demonstrator outside the downtown hotel where the American Medical Association is holding its annual meeting in Chicago, June 24, 1991. Members of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT-UP) are protesting the AMA's AIDS policies. (AP Photo/John Swart)
In 1987, the American Medical Association issued a policy statement saying it was unethical for a doctor to refuse to treat someone solely because that person had AIDS or was HIV-positive. In this photo, Chicago police officers, wearing rubber gloves, arrest a demonstrator outside the downtown hotel where the American Medical Association was holding its annual meeting in Chicago, June 24, 1991. Members of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT-UP) were protesting the AMA’s AIDS policies. (AP Photo/John Swart)
Chicago Mayor Richard Daley speaks during a news conference, Thursday, July 1, 2010 in Chicago. Daley introduced what the city says is the most comprehensive gun ordinance in the United States.  Daley said the ordinance would include a ban on gun shops in the city and prohibit guns from anywhere except inside the owner's home. That would mean owners couldn't bring a gun into a garage, yard or porch.  The ordinance would bar gun ownership for anyone convicted of a violent crime or with two or more convictions for drunken driving. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
In 1998, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley filed a $433 million-dollar lawsuit against the firearms industry, declaring that it had created a public nuisance by flooding the streets with weapons deliberately marketed to criminals. (A judge dismissed the lawsuit in 2000; an appeals court ruled in 2002 that the city of Chicago could proceed; but the Illinois Supreme Court dismissed the lawsuit in 2004.) Chicago Mayor Richard Daley speaks during a news conference, Thursday, July 1, 2010 in Chicago. Daley introduced what the city says is the most comprehensive gun ordinance in the United States. Daley said the ordinance would include a ban on gun shops in the city and prohibit guns from anywhere except inside the owner’s home. That would mean owners couldn’t bring a gun into a garage, yard or porch. The ordinance would bar gun ownership for anyone convicted of a violent crime or with two or more convictions for drunken driving. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/M. Spencer Green)
A large section of the tailpiece of American Airlines Flight 587 is lifted off a boat by a crane after the Airbus A300 crashed in the Rockaway Beach section of the Queens borough of New York Monday, Nov. 12, 2001. The tailpiece was recovered from Jamaica Bay and towed to shore. (AP Photo/Daniel P. Derella)
In 2001, American Airlines Flight 587, an Airbus A300 headed to the Dominican Republic, crashed after takeoff from New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 260 people on board and five people on the ground. Here, a large section of the tailpiece of American Airlines Flight 587 is lifted off a boat by a crane. (AP Photo/Daniel P. Derella) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/DANIEL P. DERELLA)
Michael Miller, left, and Ross Zachs, both of Hartford, share a kiss after being married in West Hartford, Conn., on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008. Miller and Zachs married on the day that a New Haven Superior Court Judge ruled that same sex marriages were legal in Connecticut.  (AP Photo/Fred Beckham)
Ten years ago: Same-sex marriages began in Connecticut, a month after the state Supreme Court ruled that gays had the right to wed. In this photo, Michael Miller, left, and Ross Zachs, both of Hartford, share a kiss after being married in West Hartford, Conn., on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008. Miller and Zachs married on the day that a New Haven Superior Court Judge ruled that same sex marriages were legal in Connecticut. (AP Photo/Fred Beckham) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Fred Beckham)
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This is a Nov. 1928 photo of Soviet Premier Josef Stalin in Moscow, Russia.  (AP Photo)
In this Nov. 12, 1936 photo, State Highway policemen cross the western span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge during its opening in San Francisco.  The project cost  $77.6 million. The bridge has been closed indefinitely after a rod installed during last month's emergency repairs snapped, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009, causing a traffic nightmare for the 280,000 motorists who cross the landmark span every day. (AP Photo)
Crew of U.S. Marines fords a river on Guadalcanal, in the Solomon Islands, to lay a telephone wire on Nov. 12, 1942. They strip down to get the wire across the Longa River to provide speedy military communication. (AP Photo/Pool)
Ernest Morial, the first black mayor of New Orleans, reaches down from the platform to shake some hands following his inauguration in New Orleans, May 2, 1978. Morial, former legislator and a judge, succeed Moon Landrieu. (AP Photo)
Chicago police officers, wearing rubber gloves, arrest a demonstrator outside the downtown hotel where the American Medical Association is holding its annual meeting in Chicago, June 24, 1991. Members of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT-UP) are protesting the AMA's AIDS policies. (AP Photo/John Swart)
Chicago Mayor Richard Daley speaks during a news conference, Thursday, July 1, 2010 in Chicago. Daley introduced what the city says is the most comprehensive gun ordinance in the United States.  Daley said the ordinance would include a ban on gun shops in the city and prohibit guns from anywhere except inside the owner's home. That would mean owners couldn't bring a gun into a garage, yard or porch.  The ordinance would bar gun ownership for anyone convicted of a violent crime or with two or more convictions for drunken driving. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
A large section of the tailpiece of American Airlines Flight 587 is lifted off a boat by a crane after the Airbus A300 crashed in the Rockaway Beach section of the Queens borough of New York Monday, Nov. 12, 2001. The tailpiece was recovered from Jamaica Bay and towed to shore. (AP Photo/Daniel P. Derella)
Michael Miller, left, and Ross Zachs, both of Hartford, share a kiss after being married in West Hartford, Conn., on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008. Miller and Zachs married on the day that a New Haven Superior Court Judge ruled that same sex marriages were legal in Connecticut.  (AP Photo/Fred Beckham)

Today is Monday, Nov. 12, the 316th day of 2018. There are 49 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Nov. 12, 1927, Josef Stalin became the undisputed ruler of the Soviet Union as Leon Trotsky was expelled from the Communist Party.

On this date:

In 1866, Chinese revolutionary Sun Yat-sen, the first provisional president of the Republic of China, was born.

In 1920, baseball got its first “czar” as Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis was elected commissioner of the American and National Leagues.

In 1936, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge opened as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a telegraph key in Washington, D.C., giving the green light to traffic.

In 1942, the World War II naval Battle of Guadalcanal began. (The Allies ended up winning a major victory over Japanese forces.)

In 1948, former Japanese premier Hideki Tojo and several other World War II Japanese leaders were sentenced to death by a war crimes tribunal.

In 1970, the Bhola cyclone struck East Pakistan; it’s believed half a million people, possibly more, were killed.

In 1977, the city of New Orleans elected its first black mayor, Ernest “Dutch” Morial, the winner of a runoff.

In 1984, space shuttle astronauts Dale Gardner and Joe Allen snared a wandering satellite in history’s first space salvage; the Palapa B2 satellite was secured in Discovery’s cargo bay for return to Earth.

In 1987, the American Medical Association issued a policy statement saying it was unethical for a doctor to refuse to treat someone solely because that person had AIDS or was HIV-positive.

In 1996, a Saudi Boeing 747 jetliner collided shortly after takeoff from New Delhi, India, with a Kazak Ilyushin-76 cargo plane, killing 349 people.

In 1998, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley filed a $433 million-dollar lawsuit against the firearms industry, declaring that it had created a public nuisance by flooding the streets with weapons deliberately marketed to criminals. (A judge dismissed the lawsuit in 2000; an appeals court ruled in 2002 that the city of Chicago could proceed; but the Illinois Supreme Court dismissed the lawsuit in 2004.)

In 2001, American Airlines Flight 587, an Airbus A300 headed to the Dominican Republic, crashed after takeoff from New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 260 people on board and five people on the ground.

Ten years ago: Same-sex marriages began in Connecticut, a month after the state Supreme Court ruled that gays had the right to wed. Kenny Chesney took home his fourth entertainer of the year trophy at the CMA Awards. Mitch Mitchell, the England-born drummer for the Jimi Hendrix Experience, was found dead in his hotel room in Portland, Ore.; he was 61.

Five years ago: An international panel of architects announced that the new World Trade Center tower in New York would replace Chicago’s Willis Tower as the nation’s tallest building upon its completion. Terry Francona of the Cleveland Indians won the AL Manager of the Year award in a close vote, and Clint Hurdle of the Pittsburgh Pirates was a runaway winner in the National League after both guided small-budget teams to the postseason. British composer John Tavener, 69, died in Child Okeford, England.

One year ago: President Donald Trump said he believed U.S. intelligence agencies, which concluded that Russia meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, but that he also believed that Russia’s Vladimir Putin felt that Russia did not interfere. Trump exchanged taunts with North Korea’s leader, tweeting, “Why would Kim Jong-un insult me by calling me ‘old,’ when I would NEVER call him ‘short and fat?'” A powerful earthquake shook the border between Iran and Iraq, killing more than 500 people. Syndicated gossip columnist Liz Smith died at the age of 94.

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