Today in History: Sept. 29

FILE - A Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 photo from files showing the sign outside New Scotland Yard, the headquarters building of London's Metropolitan Police force in central London. Scotland Yard, the world's most famous police headquarters, has been sold to Gulf investors who plan to turn it into luxury apartments. The London mayor's office said Tuesday that Abu Dhabi Financial Group had bought the site for 370 million pounds ($580 million), 120 million pounds over the asking price. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
In 1829, London’s reorganized police force, which became known as Scotland Yard, went on duty. FILE – This Oct. 30, 2012 photo shows the sign outside New Scotland Yard, the headquarters building of London’s Metropolitan Police force in central London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File) (AP)
In 1938, British, French, German and Italian leaders concluded the Munich Agreement, which was aimed at appeasing Adolf Hitler by allowing Nazi annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland. (AP) (Associated Press/Eddie Worth)
August 1978:  Pope John Paul I (Albino Luciani, 1912 - 1978) being carried in the Papal Chair. He died after only 34 days in office.  (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
In 1978, Pope John Paul I was found dead in his Vatican apartment just over a month after becoming head of the Roman Catholic Church. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Keystone)
WASHINGTON -  JULY 5:  Extra Strength Tylenol is displayed July 5, 2006 in Washington, DC.  In a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that taking a maximum recommended does of the pain reliever with acetaminophen can lead to liver damage in healthy people.  (Photo Illustration by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)
In 1982, Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules laced with deadly cyanide claimed the first of seven victims in the Chicago area. To date, the case remains unsolved. (Photo Illustration by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Brendan Smialowski)
Henry Ford II
In 1987, Henry Ford II, longtime chairman of Ford Motor Co., died in Detroit at age 70. In this April 14, 1977, file photo, Henry Ford II appears at a news conference in Dearborn, Mich. Ford named Jim Hackett its 10th CEO Monday, May 22, 2017. However, Ford did not have an official CEO role until the company went public in the 1950s. The grandson of the company’s founder, Henry Ford II was CEO from 1945 to 1979. (AP Photo/Richard Sheinwald, File)
On this date in 2005, John Roberts' nomination as U.S. chief justice cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee on a bipartisan vote of 13-5.  (AP Photo/Larry Downing, Pool)
In 2005, John G. Roberts Jr. was sworn in as the nation’s 17th chief justice after winning Senate confirmation.  (AP Photo/Larry Downing, Pool) (ap/Larry Downing)
A man with the Palestinian flag wrapped around his head, throws stones during clashes between Paletinians and Israeli soldiers at the entrance of Israeli Netzarim Jewish settlement crossing, in the southern Gaza City, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2000.  Palestinian youths stoned Israelis a day after Israel riot police stormed a major Muslim shrine in Jerusalem killing  six Palestinians. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
In 2000, Israeli riot police stormed a major Jerusalem shrine and opened fire on stone-throwing Muslim worshippers, killing four Palestinians and wounding 175. A man with the Palestinian flag wrapped around his head, throws stones during clashes between Paletinians and Israeli soldiers at the entrance of Israeli Netzarim Jewish settlement crossing, in the southern Gaza City, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2000. Palestinian youths stoned Israelis a day after Israel riot police stormed a major Muslim shrine in Jerusalem killing six Palestinians. (AP Photo/Adel Hana) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/ADEL HANA)
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FILE - A Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 photo from files showing the sign outside New Scotland Yard, the headquarters building of London's Metropolitan Police force in central London. Scotland Yard, the world's most famous police headquarters, has been sold to Gulf investors who plan to turn it into luxury apartments. The London mayor's office said Tuesday that Abu Dhabi Financial Group had bought the site for 370 million pounds ($580 million), 120 million pounds over the asking price. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
August 1978:  Pope John Paul I (Albino Luciani, 1912 - 1978) being carried in the Papal Chair. He died after only 34 days in office.  (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON -  JULY 5:  Extra Strength Tylenol is displayed July 5, 2006 in Washington, DC.  In a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that taking a maximum recommended does of the pain reliever with acetaminophen can lead to liver damage in healthy people.  (Photo Illustration by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)
Henry Ford II
On this date in 2005, John Roberts' nomination as U.S. chief justice cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee on a bipartisan vote of 13-5.  (AP Photo/Larry Downing, Pool)
A man with the Palestinian flag wrapped around his head, throws stones during clashes between Paletinians and Israeli soldiers at the entrance of Israeli Netzarim Jewish settlement crossing, in the southern Gaza City, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2000.  Palestinian youths stoned Israelis a day after Israel riot police stormed a major Muslim shrine in Jerusalem killing  six Palestinians. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

Today is Sunday, Sept. 29, the 272nd day of 2019. There are 93 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Sept. 29, 1789, the U.S. War Department established a regular army with a strength of several hundred men.

On this date:

In 1829, London’s reorganized police force, which became known as Scotland Yard, went on duty.

In 1918, Allied forces began their decisive breakthrough of the Hindenburg Line during World War I.

In 1938, British, French, German and Italian leaders concluded the Munich Agreement, which was aimed at appeasing Adolf Hitler by allowing Nazi annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland.

In 1943, General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Italian Marshal Pietro Badoglio signed an armistice aboard the British ship HMS Nelson off Malta.

In 1975, baseball manager Casey Stengel died in Glendale, California, at age 85.

In 1977, the Billy Joel album “The Stranger” was released by Columbia Records.

In 1978, Pope John Paul I was found dead in his Vatican apartment just over a month after becoming head of the Roman Catholic Church.

In 1982, Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules laced with deadly cyanide claimed the first of seven victims in the Chicago area. (To date, the case remains unsolved.)

In 1989, actress Zsa Zsa Gabor was convicted of battery for slapping Beverly Hills police officer Paul Kramer after he’d pulled over her Rolls-Royce for expired license plates. (As part of her sentence, Gabor ended up serving three days in jail.)

In 2000, Israeli riot police stormed a major Jerusalem shrine and opened fire on stone-throwing Muslim worshippers, killing four Palestinians and wounding 175.

In 2001, President George W. Bush condemned Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers for harboring Osama bin Laden and his followers as the United States pressed its military and diplomatic campaign against terror.

In 2005, John G. Roberts Jr. was sworn in as the nation’s 17th chief justice after winning Senate confirmation.

Ten years ago: New York City terrorism suspect Najibullah Zazi pleaded not guilty to conspiring to use weapons of mass destruction in what authorities said was a planned attack on commuter trains. (Zazi later pleaded guilty; he spent nearly a decade helping the U.S. identify and prosecute terrorists, and was rewarded with a sentence that effectively amounted to time already served.) Former Democratic fundraiser Norman Hsu (shoo) was sentenced in New York to more than 24 years in prison for his guilty plea to fraud charges and another four years and four months in prison for his conviction at trial for breaking campaign finance laws; he’s due to be released in 2030. A tsunami killed nearly 200 people in Samoa, American Samoa and Tonga.

Five years ago: In a blistering speech to the United Nations, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned that Hamas and the Islamic State group were “branches of the same poisonous tree,” both bent on world domination through terror, just as the Nazis had done. Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai was sworn in as Afghanistan’s new president, replacing Hamid Karzai in the country’s first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion toppled the Taliban.

One year ago: Tesla and its CEO, Elon Musk, agreed to pay a total of $40 million to settle a government lawsuit alleging that Musk had duped investors with misleading statements about a proposed buyout of the company.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2017 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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