Today in History: Sept. 29

FILE - A Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 photo from files showing the sign outside New Scotland Yard, the headquarters building of London's Metropolitan Police force in central London. Scotland Yard, the world's most famous police headquarters, has been sold to Gulf investors who plan to turn it into luxury apartments. The London mayor's office said Tuesday that Abu Dhabi Financial Group had bought the site for 370 million pounds ($580 million), 120 million pounds over the asking price. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
In 1829, London’s reorganized police force, which became known as Scotland Yard, went on duty. FILE – This Oct. 30, 2012 photo shows the sign outside New Scotland Yard, the headquarters building of London’s Metropolitan Police force in central London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File) (AP)
In 1938, British, French, German and Italian leaders concluded the Munich Agreement, which was aimed at appeasing Adolf Hitler by allowing Nazi annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland. (AP) (Associated Press/Eddie Worth)
August 1978:  Pope John Paul I (Albino Luciani, 1912 - 1978) being carried in the Papal Chair. He died after only 34 days in office.  (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
In 1978, Pope John Paul I was found dead in his Vatican apartment just over a month after becoming head of the Roman Catholic Church. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Keystone)
WASHINGTON -  JULY 5:  Extra Strength Tylenol is displayed July 5, 2006 in Washington, DC.  In a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that taking a maximum recommended does of the pain reliever with acetaminophen can lead to liver damage in healthy people.  (Photo Illustration by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)
In 1982, Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules laced with deadly cyanide claimed the first of seven victims in the Chicago area. To date, the case remains unsolved. (Photo Illustration by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Brendan Smialowski)
Henry Ford II
In 1987, Henry Ford II, longtime chairman of Ford Motor Co., died in Detroit at age 70. In this April 14, 1977, file photo, Henry Ford II appears at a news conference in Dearborn, Mich. Ford named Jim Hackett its 10th CEO Monday, May 22, 2017. However, Ford did not have an official CEO role until the company went public in the 1950s. The grandson of the company’s founder, Henry Ford II was CEO from 1945 to 1979. (AP Photo/Richard Sheinwald, File)
On this date in 2005, John Roberts' nomination as U.S. chief justice cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee on a bipartisan vote of 13-5.  (AP Photo/Larry Downing, Pool)
In 2005, John G. Roberts Jr. was sworn in as the nation’s 17th chief justice after winning Senate confirmation.  (AP Photo/Larry Downing, Pool) (ap/Larry Downing)
A man with the Palestinian flag wrapped around his head, throws stones during clashes between Paletinians and Israeli soldiers at the entrance of Israeli Netzarim Jewish settlement crossing, in the southern Gaza City, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2000.  Palestinian youths stoned Israelis a day after Israel riot police stormed a major Muslim shrine in Jerusalem killing  six Palestinians. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
In 2000, Israeli riot police stormed a major Jerusalem shrine and opened fire on stone-throwing Muslim worshippers, killing four Palestinians and wounding 175. A man with the Palestinian flag wrapped around his head, throws stones during clashes between Paletinians and Israeli soldiers at the entrance of Israeli Netzarim Jewish settlement crossing, in the southern Gaza City, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2000. Palestinian youths stoned Israelis a day after Israel riot police stormed a major Muslim shrine in Jerusalem killing six Palestinians. (AP Photo/Adel Hana) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/ADEL HANA)
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FILE - A Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 photo from files showing the sign outside New Scotland Yard, the headquarters building of London's Metropolitan Police force in central London. Scotland Yard, the world's most famous police headquarters, has been sold to Gulf investors who plan to turn it into luxury apartments. The London mayor's office said Tuesday that Abu Dhabi Financial Group had bought the site for 370 million pounds ($580 million), 120 million pounds over the asking price. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
August 1978:  Pope John Paul I (Albino Luciani, 1912 - 1978) being carried in the Papal Chair. He died after only 34 days in office.  (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON -  JULY 5:  Extra Strength Tylenol is displayed July 5, 2006 in Washington, DC.  In a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that taking a maximum recommended does of the pain reliever with acetaminophen can lead to liver damage in healthy people.  (Photo Illustration by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)
Henry Ford II
On this date in 2005, John Roberts' nomination as U.S. chief justice cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee on a bipartisan vote of 13-5.  (AP Photo/Larry Downing, Pool)
A man with the Palestinian flag wrapped around his head, throws stones during clashes between Paletinians and Israeli soldiers at the entrance of Israeli Netzarim Jewish settlement crossing, in the southern Gaza City, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2000.  Palestinian youths stoned Israelis a day after Israel riot police stormed a major Muslim shrine in Jerusalem killing  six Palestinians. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

Today is Saturday, Sept. 29, the 272nd day of 2018. There are 93 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Sept. 29, 1978, Pope John Paul I was found dead in his Vatican apartment just over a month after becoming head of the Roman Catholic Church.

On this date:

In 1789, the U.S. War Department established a regular army with a strength of several hundred men.

In 1829, London’s reorganized police force, which became known as Scotland Yard, went on duty.

In 1910, the National Urban League had its beginnings in New York as The Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes.

In 1938, British, French, German and Italian leaders concluded the Munich Agreement, which was aimed at appeasing Adolf Hitler by allowing Nazi annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland.

In 1943, General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Italian Marshal Pietro Badoglio signed an armistice aboard the British ship HMS Nelson off Malta.

In 1957, the San Francisco-bound New York Giants played their last game at the Polo Grounds, losing to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 9-1. The Brooklyn Dodgers played their last game before moving to Los Angeles, losing to the Phillies 2-1 in Philadelphia.

In 1977, the Billy Joel album “The Stranger” was released by Columbia Records.

In 1982, Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules laced with deadly cyanide claimed the first of seven victims in the Chicago area. (To date, the case remains unsolved.)

In 1987, Henry Ford II, longtime chairman of Ford Motor Co., died in Detroit at age 70.

In 2000, Israeli riot police stormed a major Jerusalem shrine and opened fire on stone-throwing Muslim worshippers, killing four Palestinians and wounding 175.

In 2001, President George W. Bush condemned Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers for harboring Osama bin Laden and his followers as the United States pressed its military and diplomatic campaign against terror.

In 2005, John G. Roberts Jr. was sworn in as the nation’s 17th chief justice after winning Senate confirmation.

Ten years ago: On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 777 points after the House defeated, 228-205, a $700 billion emergency rescue for the nation’s financial system, leaving both parties and the Bush administration scrambling to pick up the pieces.

Five years ago: NASA’s newest delivery service, Orbital Sciences Corp.’s unmanned cargo spacecraft Cygnus, made its first-ever shipment to the International Space Station. Some four dozen people were shot to death at an agricultural college in Gujba, Nigeria, in an attack blamed on Boko Haram. A car bomb tore through a market in Peshawar, Pakistan, killing at least 41 people. On the last day of the season, Miami’s Henderson Alvarez pitched one of baseball’s most bizarre no-hitters. Alvarez celebrated in the on-deck circle when the Marlins scored on a two-out wild pitch in the bottom of the ninth inning to beat the Detroit Tigers 1-0.

One year ago: Tom Price resigned as President Donald Trump’s secretary of Health and Human Services amid investigations into his use of costly charter flights for official travel at taxpayer expense. The United States warned Americans to stay away from Cuba, and ordered home more than half of the American diplomatic corps there; the administration began referring to the mysterious health ailments affecting Americans there as “attacks” rather than “incidents” but acknowledged that neither Cuban nor US investigators could figure out who or what was responsible. San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz accused the Trump administration of “killing us with the inefficiency” after Hurricane Maria.

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