Today in History: Sept. 27

circa 1935:  American singer and actress Judy Garland seated, left, at a children's tea party.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
In 1935, Garland, at age 13, signed a seven-year contract with MGM. Here, American singer and actress Judy Garland seated, left, at a children’s tea party.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Hulton Archive)
NEW YORK - CIRCA 1940:  Glenn Miller (left) of the Glenn Miller Orchestra and his drummer perform in circa 1940 in New York. (Photo by PoPsie Randolph/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
In 1942, Glenn Miller and his Orchestra performed together for the last time, at the Central Theater in Passaic, New Jersey, prior to Miller’s entry into the Army. Here, Glenn Miller (left) of the Glenn Miller Orchestra and his drummer perform in New York.  (Photo by PoPsie Randolph/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Donaldson Collection)
Rachel Louise Carson, a pioneer in the conservationist movement, poses at her home in Washington, D.C. on March 13, 1963. Carson is the author of "Silent Spring," a book that has drawn public attention to problems caused by agricultural pesticides. (AP Photo)
In 1962, “Silent Spring,” Rachel Carson’s study on the effects of pesticides on the environment, was published in book form by Houghton Mifflin. Here, Rachel Louise Carson, a pioneer in the conservationist movement, poses at her home in Washington, D.C. on March 13, 1963. Carson is the author of “Silent Spring,” a book that has drawn public attention to problems caused by agricultural pesticides. (AP Photo) (AP)
circa 1927:  Clara Bow holds up some underwear, watched suspiciously by William Austin, in a scene from the film, 'It'.  Title: It Studio: Famous Players-Lasky / Paramount Director: Clarence Badger  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
In 1965, silent film star Clara Bow, 60, died in Los Angeles. Here, Clara Bow holds up some underwear, watched suspiciously by William Austin, in a scene from the film, ‘It’. Title: It Studio: Famous Players-Lasky / Paramount Director: Clarence Badger (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Hulton Archive)
People are reflected on a wall of the Sony showroom building at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017.  Japanese electronics and entertainment company Sony Corp. said its profit dropped 84 percent in October-December as losses in its movie division offset healthy results in its video game business. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
In 1989, Columbia Pictures Entertainment Inc. agreed to a $3.4 billion cash buyout by Sony Corp. In the photo, people are reflected on a wall of the Sony showroom building at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017.  (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Parade of Repub. congressional incumbents & contenders marching to Capitol bldg. to sign Newt Gingrich's Contract with America during 1994 campaigns.  (Photo by Stephen Jaffe/Image Works/Image Works/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
In 1994, more than 350 Republican congressional candidates gathered on the steps of the U.S. Capitol to sign the “Contract with America,” a 10-point platform they pledged to try to get enacted if voters sent a GOP majority to the House. (Photo by Stephen Jaffe/Image Works/Image Works/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images) (The LIFE Images Collection/Getty/Stephen Jaffe/Image Works)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 25:  US Secretary of the Treasury Robert Rubin holds up a new US 100 dollar bill during a news conference 25 March at the Federal Reserve Bank in New York. In the first major change to US currency since 1929, the new bill is designed to thwart counterfeiters.  (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
In 1995, the government unveiled its redesigned $100 bill, featuring a larger, off-center portrait of Benjamin Franklin. (Yet another redesign, featuring a high-tech makeover aimed at thwarting counterfeiters, was announced in April 2010.) (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images) (AFP/Getty Images/DON EMMERT)
WASHINGTON - SEPTEMBER 27:  Former Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Director Michael Brown testifies during a hearing before the House Select Hurricane Katrina Committee on Capitol Hill September 27, 2005 in Washington, DC. The full committee met to hear testimony on FEMA's response to Hurrican Katrina.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
In 2005, in a fiery appearance before Congress, former FEMA director Michael Brown angrily blamed the governor of Louisiana, the mayor of New Orleans and even the Bush White House that appointed him for the dismal response to Hurricane Katrina; in response, lawmakers alternately lambasted and mocked the former official.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Win McNamee)
WASHINGTON D.C. - SEPTEMBER 27: U.S. President Barack Obama speaks on stage for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Annual Phoenix Awards dinner, September 27, 2014 in Washington, DC. The CBC's annual conference brings together activists, politicians and business leaders to discuss public policy impacting Black communities in America and abroad. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
In 2014, President Barack Obama, in an address to the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, said that a widespread mistrust of law enforcement that was exposed by the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black man in Ferguson, Missouri, existed in too many other communities and was having a corrosive effect on the nation, particularly its children.  (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Pool)
Jeffrey DeLaurentis
In 2016, President Barack Obama announced career diplomat Jeffrey DeLaurentis as his choice to become the first U.S. ambassador to Cuba in more than a half-century. In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo Jeffrey DeLaurentis, then-Charge d’Affaires to the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Cuba, speaks in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File) (AP/David Goldman)
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circa 1935:  American singer and actress Judy Garland seated, left, at a children's tea party.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - CIRCA 1940:  Glenn Miller (left) of the Glenn Miller Orchestra and his drummer perform in circa 1940 in New York. (Photo by PoPsie Randolph/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
Rachel Louise Carson, a pioneer in the conservationist movement, poses at her home in Washington, D.C. on March 13, 1963. Carson is the author of "Silent Spring," a book that has drawn public attention to problems caused by agricultural pesticides. (AP Photo)
circa 1927:  Clara Bow holds up some underwear, watched suspiciously by William Austin, in a scene from the film, 'It'.  Title: It Studio: Famous Players-Lasky / Paramount Director: Clarence Badger  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
People are reflected on a wall of the Sony showroom building at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017.  Japanese electronics and entertainment company Sony Corp. said its profit dropped 84 percent in October-December as losses in its movie division offset healthy results in its video game business. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Parade of Repub. congressional incumbents & contenders marching to Capitol bldg. to sign Newt Gingrich's Contract with America during 1994 campaigns.  (Photo by Stephen Jaffe/Image Works/Image Works/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 25:  US Secretary of the Treasury Robert Rubin holds up a new US 100 dollar bill during a news conference 25 March at the Federal Reserve Bank in New York. In the first major change to US currency since 1929, the new bill is designed to thwart counterfeiters.  (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - SEPTEMBER 27:  Former Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Director Michael Brown testifies during a hearing before the House Select Hurricane Katrina Committee on Capitol Hill September 27, 2005 in Washington, DC. The full committee met to hear testimony on FEMA's response to Hurrican Katrina.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON D.C. - SEPTEMBER 27: U.S. President Barack Obama speaks on stage for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Annual Phoenix Awards dinner, September 27, 2014 in Washington, DC. The CBC's annual conference brings together activists, politicians and business leaders to discuss public policy impacting Black communities in America and abroad. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
Jeffrey DeLaurentis

Today is Thursday, Sept. 27, the 270th day of 2018. There are 95 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On September 27, 1939, Warsaw, Poland, surrendered after weeks of resistance to invading forces from Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union during World War II.

On this date:

In 1825, the first locomotive to haul a passenger train was operated by George Stephenson in England.

In 1854, the first great disaster involving an Atlantic Ocean passenger vessel occurred when the steamship SS Arctic sank off Newfoundland; of the more than 400 people on board, only 86 survived.

In 1917, French sculptor and painter Edgar Degas died in Paris at age 83.

In 1928, the United States said it was recognizing the Nationalist Chinese government.

In 1942, Glenn Miller and his Orchestra performed together for the last time, at the Central Theater in Passaic, New Jersey, prior to Miller’s entry into the Army.

In 1962, “Silent Spring,” Rachel Carson’s study on the effects of pesticides on the environment, was published in book form by Houghton Mifflin.

In 1964, the government publicly released the report of the Warren Commission, which concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy.

In 1979, Congress gave its final approval to forming the U.S. Department of Education.

In 1991, President George H.W. Bush announced in a nationally broadcast address that he was eliminating all U.S. battlefield nuclear weapons, and called on the Soviet Union to match the gesture. The Senate Judiciary Committee deadlocked, 7-7, on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 1994, more than 350 Republican congressional candidates gathered on the steps of the U.S. Capitol to sign the “Contract with America,” a 10-point platform they pledged to enact if voters sent a GOP majority to the House.

In 1996, in Afghanistan, the Taliban, a band of former seminary students, drove the government of President Burhanuddin Rabbani out of Kabul, captured the capital and executed former leader Najibullah.

In 2004, NBC announced that “Tonight Show” host Jay Leno would be succeeded by “Late Night” host Conan O’Brien in 2009. (O’Brien’s stint on “The Tonight Show” lasted just over seven months.)

Ten years ago: China marked its first spacewalk as astronaut Zhai Zhigang floated outside the Shenzhou 7 for 13 minutes.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani spoke by telephone, the first conversation between American and Iranian leaders in more than 30 years. The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to secure and destroy Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile.

One year ago: President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans unveiled the first major revamp of the nation’s tax code in a generation, a plan that included deep tax cuts for corporations, simplified tax brackets and a near-doubling of the standard deduction. Maria regained strength and became a hurricane again, pushing water over both sides of North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Playboy founder Hugh Hefner died at the age of 91.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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