Today in History: Sept. 18

On September 18, 1793, President George Washington laid the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol. The north and south wings, central portion and low wooden dome of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., is shown in this illustration circa 1840.  (AP Photo)
In 1793, President George Washington laid the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol. The north and south wings, central portion and low wooden dome of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., is shown in this illustration circa 1840. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
On this date in 1961, United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold was killed in a plane crash in northern Rhodesia. Hammarskjold is seen here on a visit to Sweden in 1953. (AP Photo)
In 1961, United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold was killed in a plane crash in northern Rhodesia. Hammarskjold is seen here on a visit to Sweden in 1953. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
On this date in 1970, rock star Jimi Hendrix died in London at age 27. Here, friends of Hendrix carry his coffin from the church after funeral services, Oct. 1, 1970 in Seattle. (AP Photo/Barry Sweet)
In 1970, rock star Jimi Hendrix died in London at age 27. Here, friends of Hendrix carry his coffin from the church after funeral services, Oct. 1, 1970 in Seattle. (AP Photo/Barry Sweet) (AP/BARRY SWEET)
On this date in 1975, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was captured by the FBI in San Francisco, 19 months after being kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army. (AP Photo)
In 1975, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was captured by the FBI in San Francisco, 19 months after being kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
An editorial titled "A Free Press Needs You" is published in The New York Times, Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in New York. Newspapers from Maine to Hawaii pushed back against President Donald Trump's attacks on "fake news" Thursday with a coordinated series of editorials speaking up for a free and vigorous press. The Boston Globe, which set the campaign in motion by urging the unified voice, had estimated that some 350 newspapers would participate. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In 1851, the first edition of The New York Times was published. An editorial titled “A Free Press Needs You” is published in The New York Times, Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in New York. Newspapers from Maine to Hawaii pushed back against President Donald Trump’s attacks on “fake news” Thursday with a coordinated series of editorials speaking up for a free and vigorous press. The Boston Globe, which set the campaign in motion by urging the unified voice, had estimated that some 350 newspapers would participate. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) (AP/Mark Lennihan)
This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling "cultures of the now infamous 'Ames' strain of Bacillus anthracis" at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn't take a position on the FBI's conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins' co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo)
In 2001, letters postmarked Trenton, N.J., that later tested positive for anthrax were sent to the New York Post and NBC anchorman Tom Brokaw. This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling “cultures of the now infamous ‘Ames’ strain of Bacillus anthracis” at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn’t take a position on the FBI’s conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins’ co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo) (AP)
Actor Michael Douglas and actress Glenn Close pose outside the Loew's Theater in New York, USA on Sept. 17, 1987 after viewing the premier of their new movie "Fatal Attraction." (AP Photo/Frankie Ziths)
In 1987, the psychological thriller “Fatal Attraction,” starring Michael Douglas and Glenn Close, was released by Paramount Pictures. Actor Michael Douglas and actress Glenn Close pose outside the Loew’s Theater in New York, USA on Sept. 17, 1987 after viewing the premier of their new movie “Fatal Attraction.” (AP Photo/Frankie Ziths) (AP/Frankie Ziths)
(1/7)
On September 18, 1793, President George Washington laid the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol. The north and south wings, central portion and low wooden dome of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., is shown in this illustration circa 1840.  (AP Photo)
On this date in 1961, United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold was killed in a plane crash in northern Rhodesia. Hammarskjold is seen here on a visit to Sweden in 1953. (AP Photo)
On this date in 1970, rock star Jimi Hendrix died in London at age 27. Here, friends of Hendrix carry his coffin from the church after funeral services, Oct. 1, 1970 in Seattle. (AP Photo/Barry Sweet)
On this date in 1975, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was captured by the FBI in San Francisco, 19 months after being kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army. (AP Photo)
An editorial titled "A Free Press Needs You" is published in The New York Times, Thursday, Aug. 16, 2018, in New York. Newspapers from Maine to Hawaii pushed back against President Donald Trump's attacks on "fake news" Thursday with a coordinated series of editorials speaking up for a free and vigorous press. The Boston Globe, which set the campaign in motion by urging the unified voice, had estimated that some 350 newspapers would participate. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling "cultures of the now infamous 'Ames' strain of Bacillus anthracis" at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn't take a position on the FBI's conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins' co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo)
Actor Michael Douglas and actress Glenn Close pose outside the Loew's Theater in New York, USA on Sept. 17, 1987 after viewing the premier of their new movie "Fatal Attraction." (AP Photo/Frankie Ziths)

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 18, the 261st day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Sept. 18, 1975, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was captured by the FBI in San Francisco, 19 months after being kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army.

On this date:

In 1759, the French formally surrendered Quebec to the British.

In 1793, President George Washington laid the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol.

In 1850, Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act, which created a force of federal commissioners charged with returning escaped slaves to their owners.

In 1851, the first edition of The New York Times was published.

In 1947, the National Security Act, which created a National Military Establishment and the position of Secretary of Defense, went into effect.

In 1959, during his U.S. tour, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev visited Wall Street, the Empire State Building and the grave of President Franklin D. Roosevelt; in a speech to the U.N. General Assembly, Khrushchev called on all countries to disarm.

In 1961, United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold (dahg HAWM’-ahr-shoold) was killed in a plane crash in northern Rhodesia.

In 1970, rock star Jimi Hendrix died in London at age 27.

In 1987, the psychological thriller “Fatal Attraction,” starring Michael Douglas and Glenn Close, was released by Paramount Pictures.

In 1994, tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis, 40, was found dead in the guest cottage of a friend’s home in Southampton, New York, of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning.

In 2001, a week after the Sept. 11 attack, President George W. Bush said he hoped to “rally the world” in the battle against terrorism and predicted that all “people who love freedom” would join. Letters postmarked Trenton, N.J., that later tested positive for anthrax were sent to the New York Post and NBC anchorman Tom Brokaw.

In 2007, O.J. Simpson was charged with seven felonies, including kidnapping, in the alleged armed robbery of sports memorabilia collectors in a Las Vegas casino-hotel room. (Simpson, sentenced to nine to 33 years in prison, was released on parole in October 2017.)

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush told the country his administration was working feverishly to calm turmoil in the financial markets. The president met with Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, who then asked Congress to give the government power to rescue banks by buying up their bad assets. Stocks on Wall Street shot up more than 400 points on word a plan was in the works.

Five years ago: Syrian President Bashar Assad, in a Fox News Channel interview, said a United Nations report finding “clear and convincing evidence” sarin nerve gas was used in Syria painted an “unrealistic” account, and denied his government had orchestrated the attack. Former heavyweight boxing champion Ken Norton, 70, died in Las Vegas.

One year ago: Hurricane Maria intensified into a dangerous Category 5 storm, surging into the eastern Caribbean on a path that would take it near many of the islands recently devastated by Hurricane Irma. Toys R Us, the pioneering big box toy retailer, announced that it was filing for bankruptcy protection, but that it would continue its normal business operations. (The company announced in March of 2018 that it would be liquidating its U.S. business.)

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up