Today in History: March 7

FILE - In this March 7, 1965, file photo tear gas fills the air as state troopers, ordered by Alabama Gov. George Wallace, break up a  march at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., on what became known as Bloody Sunday.  President Barack Obama is marking the 45th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday" by praising "these heroes" who marched into history and endured beatings by Alabama state troopers at the start of their landmark voting rights trek. The nation's first black president says that despite all the progress since "that terrible day in Selma," more still needs to be done . (AP Photo/File)
In 1965, a march by civil rights demonstrators was violently broken up at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, by state troopers and a sheriff’s posse in what came to be known as “Bloody Sunday.” (AP Photo/File)

In this handout photo taken on Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017 and released on Monday, Aug. 7, 2017 by Zona.media, Maria Alyokhina and Olga Borisova, members of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot, hold flares and a banner on the bridge nearby outside the prison colony in Yakutsk, Russia, Monday, Aug. 7, 2017. Film director Oleg Sentsov of Crimea, which Russia annexed from Ukraine in 2014, was convicted of conspiracy to commit terror attacks by a Russian military court in 2015 and sentenced to 20 years in prison. (AP Photo/ Zona.media via AP)
In 2014, Russia was swept up in patriotic fervor in anticipation of bringing Crimea back into its territory, with tens of thousands of people thronging Red Square in Moscow chanting, “Crimea is Russia!”

In this handout photo taken on Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017 and released on Monday, Aug. 7, 2017 by Zona.media, Maria Alyokhina and Olga Borisova, members of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot, hold flares and a banner on the bridge nearby outside the prison colony in Yakutsk, Russia, Monday, Aug. 7, 2017. Film director Oleg Sentsov of Crimea, which Russia annexed from Ukraine in 2014, was convicted of conspiracy to commit terror attacks by a Russian military court in 2015 and sentenced to 20 years in prison. (AP Photo/ Zona.media via AP)

This antique phone is part of the decoration of a hotel morocco
In 1926, the first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversations took place between New York and London. (Thinkstock)

Rand Paul
In 1975, the U.S. Senate revised its filibuster rule, allowing 60 senators to limit debate in most cases, instead of the previously required two-thirds of senators present.

In this image from Senate video, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and a Republican presidential contender, speaks on the floor of the U.S. Senate Wednesday afternoon, May 20, 2015, at the Capitol in Washington, during a long speech opposing renewal of the Patriot Act. Paul claimed he was filibustering, but under the Senate rules, he wasn’t. (Senate TV via AP)

Adolf Hitler, lower left, addresses 25,000 stormtroopers from an improvised rostrum on the steps of the Atlas Museum in the Lustgarten of Berlin, Germany, on the third anniversary of National Socialism's rise to power on Jan. 30, 1936. In his speech, Hitler reiterated Germany's will to peace. The Nazi Party leader was appointed Chancellor of Germany on Jan. 30, 1933. (AP Photo)
On March 7, 1936, Adolf Hitler ordered his troops to march into the Rhineland, thereby breaking the Treaty of Versailles (vehr-SY’) and the Locarno Pact.

Adolf Hitler, lower left, addresses 25,000 stormtroopers from an improvised rostrum on the steps of the Atlas Museum in the Lustgarten of Berlin, Germany, on the third anniversary of National Socialism’s rise to power on Jan. 30, 1936. In his speech, Hitler reiterated Germany’s will to peace. The Nazi Party leader was appointed Chancellor of Germany on Jan. 30, 1933. (AP Photo)

This photo proved by Warner Bros. Home Entertainment shows a box set, the 10-disc "Stanley Kubrick: The Masterpiece Collection." It includes a hardcover book of film archive photos, two new documentaries about Kubrick, and eight of his films: "Lolita," "Dr. Strangelove," "2001: A Space Odyssey," "A Clockwork Orange," "Barry Lyndon," "The Shining," "Full Metal Jacket" and "Eyes Wide Shut."  (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Home Entertainment)
In 1999, movie director Stanley Kubrick, whose films included “Dr. Strangelove,” “A Clockwork Orange” and “2001: A Space Odyssey,” died in Hertfordshire, England, at age 70, having just finished editing “Eyes Wide Shut.”

This photo proved by Warner Bros. Home Entertainment shows a box set, the 10-disc “Stanley Kubrick: The Masterpiece Collection.” It includes a hardcover book of film archive photos, two new documentaries about Kubrick, and eight of his films: “Lolita,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Barry Lyndon,” “The Shining,” “Full Metal Jacket” and “Eyes Wide Shut.” (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Home Entertainment)

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FILE - In this March 7, 1965, file photo tear gas fills the air as state troopers, ordered by Alabama Gov. George Wallace, break up a  march at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., on what became known as Bloody Sunday.  President Barack Obama is marking the 45th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday" by praising "these heroes" who marched into history and endured beatings by Alabama state troopers at the start of their landmark voting rights trek. The nation's first black president says that despite all the progress since "that terrible day in Selma," more still needs to be done . (AP Photo/File)
In this handout photo taken on Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017 and released on Monday, Aug. 7, 2017 by Zona.media, Maria Alyokhina and Olga Borisova, members of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot, hold flares and a banner on the bridge nearby outside the prison colony in Yakutsk, Russia, Monday, Aug. 7, 2017. Film director Oleg Sentsov of Crimea, which Russia annexed from Ukraine in 2014, was convicted of conspiracy to commit terror attacks by a Russian military court in 2015 and sentenced to 20 years in prison. (AP Photo/ Zona.media via AP)
This antique phone is part of the decoration of a hotel morocco
Rand Paul
Adolf Hitler, lower left, addresses 25,000 stormtroopers from an improvised rostrum on the steps of the Atlas Museum in the Lustgarten of Berlin, Germany, on the third anniversary of National Socialism's rise to power on Jan. 30, 1936. In his speech, Hitler reiterated Germany's will to peace. The Nazi Party leader was appointed Chancellor of Germany on Jan. 30, 1933. (AP Photo)
This photo proved by Warner Bros. Home Entertainment shows a box set, the 10-disc "Stanley Kubrick: The Masterpiece Collection." It includes a hardcover book of film archive photos, two new documentaries about Kubrick, and eight of his films: "Lolita," "Dr. Strangelove," "2001: A Space Odyssey," "A Clockwork Orange," "Barry Lyndon," "The Shining," "Full Metal Jacket" and "Eyes Wide Shut."  (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Home Entertainment)

Today is Thursday, March 7, the 66th day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On March 7, 1936, Adolf Hitler ordered his troops to march into the Rhineland, thereby breaking the Treaty of Versailles (vehr-SY’) and the Locarno Pact.

On this date:

In 1793, during the French Revolutionary Wars, France declared war on Spain.

In 1850, in a three-hour speech to the U.S. Senate, Daniel Webster of Massachusetts endorsed the Compromise of 1850 as a means of preserving the Union.

In 1911, President William Howard Taft ordered 20,000 troops to patrol the U.S.-Mexico border in response to the Mexican Revolution.

In 1912, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen arrived in Hobart, Australia, where he dispatched telegrams announcing his success in leading the first expedition to the South Pole the previous December.

In 1926, the first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversations took place between New York and London.

In 1945, during World War II, U.S. forces crossed the Rhine at Remagen, Germany, using the damaged but still usable Ludendorff Bridge.

In 1955, the first TV production of the musical “Peter Pan” starring Mary Martin aired on NBC.

In 1965, a march by civil rights demonstrators was violently broken up at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, by state troopers and a sheriff’s posse in what came to be known as “Bloody Sunday.”

In 1975, the U.S. Senate revised its filibuster rule, allowing 60 senators to limit debate in most cases, instead of the previously required two-thirds of senators present.

In 1981, anti-government guerrillas in Colombia executed kidnapped American Bible translator Chester Bitterman, whom they accused of being a CIA agent.

In 1994, the U.S. Navy issued its first permanent orders assigning women to regular duty on a combat ship _ in this case, the USS Eisenhower.

In 1999, movie director Stanley Kubrick, whose films included “Dr. Strangelove,” `’A Clockwork Orange” and “2001: A Space Odyssey,” died in Hertfordshire, England, at age 70, having just finished editing “Eyes Wide Shut.”

Ten years ago: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton met with Turkish leaders in Ankara, where she announced that President Barack Obama was planning to make his own visit, which took place in April 2009. Western-backed Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad submitted his resignation (however, he retained his position under a new government). Former Metropolitan Opera general manager Schuyler Chapin died in New York at age 86. Former child actor and singer Jimmy Boyd (”I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus”) died in Santa Monica, Calif., at age 70.

Five years ago: Russia was swept up in patriotic fervor in anticipation of bringing Crimea back into its territory, with tens of thousands of people thronging Red Square in Moscow chanting, “Crimea is Russia!”

One year ago: The White House said Mexico, Canada and other countries could be spared from President Donald Trump’s planned steel and aluminum tariffs under national security “carve-outs.” For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with as much as two feet of wet, heavy snow that grounded flights, closed schools and knocked out power.

Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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