Today in History: Nov. 5

A portrait of Guy Fawkes, shown Feb. 21, 1977, showing him gaunt from torture after discovery of the Gunpowder Plot of 1606, which is to be sold at Sothebys on March 9. It was done anonymously during "one of his examinations" --  the interrogation torture at the Tower after his arrest. Fawkes was tortured extensively to reveal the names of the other plotters and his crushed fingers could barely sign the confession which is in the Public Record Office. The portrait is expected to fetch between £200 - £400. (AP Photo/Press Association)
In 1605, the “Gunpowder Plot” failed as Guy Fawkes was seized before he could blow up the English Parliament. (AP Photo/Press Association) (AP/Anonymous)
WASHINGTON - APRIL 15:  A Monopoly game is seen during the Monopoly U.S. National Championship tournament at Union Station April 15, 2009 in Washington, DC. 28 finalists are competing for the title of National Champion who will represent the U.S. in the World Championship in October in Las Vegas.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
In 1935, Parker Brothers began marketing the board game “Monopoly.” (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Alex Wong)
First lady Eleanor Roosevelt smiles President Franklin D. Roosevelt's side, as he waves a greeting to the crowd which cheered him as he left St. John's Church in Washington, Jan. 20, 1941, his third inaugural day. (AP Photo)
In 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office as he defeated Republican challenger Wendell L. Willkie. In this photo, first lady Eleanor Roosevelt smiles at President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s side, as he waves a greeting to the crowd which cheered him as he left St. John’s Church in Washington, Jan. 20, 1941, his third inaugural day. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
President Richard M. Nixon takes the oath of office from Chief Justice Earl Warren as his wife, Pat Nixon, holds two family bibles on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 20, 1969. Former President Lyndon Johnson is beside Warren while Nixon is flanked by Vice President Spiro Agnew and former Vice President Hubert Humphrey, right. Lady Bird Johnson, the former president's wife is at extreme left, and Agnew's wife Judy is beside her. Sen. Mike Mansfield is at right. (AP Photo)
In 1968, Republican Richard M. Nixon won the presidency, defeating Democratic Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and American Independent candidate George C. Wallace. Here, Nixon takes the oath of office from Chief Justice Earl Warren as his wife, Pat Nixon, holds two family bibles on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 20, 1969. (AP Photo) (AP)
Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., left, chats with Gov. Ella T. Grasso, of Connecticut, prior to delivering the keynote address at the opening session of the Controlling Health Care Costs convention in Washington on Monday, June 27, 1977. Kennedy is chairman of the Senate Human Resources subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research. (AP Photo)
In 1974, Democrat Ella T. Grasso was elected governor of Connecticut, becoming the first woman to win a gubernatorial office without succeeding her husband. Here, Sen. Edward Kennedy, left, chats with Grasso on June 27, 1977. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Former President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy pose for pictures during a tour of the "Christmas Around the World" exhibit at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum Tuesday, Nov. 22, 1994, in Simi Valley, Calif.  The event marked the former President's first public appearance since the Nov. 5, 1994, public announcement that he has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.  The disease seems to have silenced Reagan, who cherished the moments he spent spinning yarns about Hollywood andthe White House.  (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
In 1994, former President Ronald Reagan disclosed he had Alzheimer’s disease. Here, Reagan poses for pictures during a tour of the “Christmas Around the World” exhibit at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum on Nov. 22, 1994, in Simi Valley, Calif. The event marked the former President’s first public appearance since the Nov. 5, 1994, public announcement that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/MARK J TERRILL)
Purple Heart recipient Pfc. James Armstrong, touches the image of Cpt. John Gaffaney, as he looks at pictures of those killed in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting prior to a Purple Heart ceremony held at Fort Hood, Texas, on Friday, April 10, 2015.  Survivors and family members of those killed during the attack by Maj. Nidal Hasan in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting were awarded 44 medals, Purple Heart for soldiers and Defense of Freedom Medals for civilians. (AP Photo/Austin American-Statesman, Rodolfo Gonzalez, Pool)
In 2009, a shooting rampage at the Fort Hood Army post in Texas left 13 people dead; Maj. Nidal Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, was later convicted of murder and sentenced to death. In this photo, Purple Heart recipient Pfc. James Armstrong, touches the image of Cpt. John Gaffaney, as he looks at pictures of those killed in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting prior to a Purple Heart ceremony held at Fort Hood, Texas, on Friday, April 10, 2015. Survivors and family members of those killed during the attack by Maj. Nidal Hasan in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting were awarded 44 medals, Purple Heart for soldiers and Defense of Freedom Medals for civilians. (AP Photo/Austin American-Statesman, Rodolfo Gonzalez, Pool) (AP)
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A portrait of Guy Fawkes, shown Feb. 21, 1977, showing him gaunt from torture after discovery of the Gunpowder Plot of 1606, which is to be sold at Sothebys on March 9. It was done anonymously during "one of his examinations" --  the interrogation torture at the Tower after his arrest. Fawkes was tortured extensively to reveal the names of the other plotters and his crushed fingers could barely sign the confession which is in the Public Record Office. The portrait is expected to fetch between £200 - £400. (AP Photo/Press Association)
WASHINGTON - APRIL 15:  A Monopoly game is seen during the Monopoly U.S. National Championship tournament at Union Station April 15, 2009 in Washington, DC. 28 finalists are competing for the title of National Champion who will represent the U.S. in the World Championship in October in Las Vegas.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
First lady Eleanor Roosevelt smiles President Franklin D. Roosevelt's side, as he waves a greeting to the crowd which cheered him as he left St. John's Church in Washington, Jan. 20, 1941, his third inaugural day. (AP Photo)
President Richard M. Nixon takes the oath of office from Chief Justice Earl Warren as his wife, Pat Nixon, holds two family bibles on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 20, 1969. Former President Lyndon Johnson is beside Warren while Nixon is flanked by Vice President Spiro Agnew and former Vice President Hubert Humphrey, right. Lady Bird Johnson, the former president's wife is at extreme left, and Agnew's wife Judy is beside her. Sen. Mike Mansfield is at right. (AP Photo)
Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., left, chats with Gov. Ella T. Grasso, of Connecticut, prior to delivering the keynote address at the opening session of the Controlling Health Care Costs convention in Washington on Monday, June 27, 1977. Kennedy is chairman of the Senate Human Resources subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research. (AP Photo)
Former President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy pose for pictures during a tour of the "Christmas Around the World" exhibit at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum Tuesday, Nov. 22, 1994, in Simi Valley, Calif.  The event marked the former President's first public appearance since the Nov. 5, 1994, public announcement that he has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.  The disease seems to have silenced Reagan, who cherished the moments he spent spinning yarns about Hollywood andthe White House.  (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
Purple Heart recipient Pfc. James Armstrong, touches the image of Cpt. John Gaffaney, as he looks at pictures of those killed in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting prior to a Purple Heart ceremony held at Fort Hood, Texas, on Friday, April 10, 2015.  Survivors and family members of those killed during the attack by Maj. Nidal Hasan in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting were awarded 44 medals, Purple Heart for soldiers and Defense of Freedom Medals for civilians. (AP Photo/Austin American-Statesman, Rodolfo Gonzalez, Pool)

Today is Monday, Nov. 5, the 309th day of 2018. There are 56 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Nov. 5, 1968, Republican Richard M. Nixon won the presidency, defeating Democratic Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and American Independent candidate George C. Wallace.

On this date:

In 1605, the “Gunpowder Plot” failed as Guy Fawkes was seized before he could blow up the English Parliament.

In 1911, aviator Calbraith P. Rodgers arrived in Pasadena, Calif., completing the first transcontinental airplane trip in 49 days.

In 1935, Parker Brothers began marketing the board game “Monopoly.”

In 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office as he defeated Republican challenger Wendell L. Willkie.

In 1956, Britain and France started landing forces in Egypt during fighting between Egyptian and Israeli forces around the Suez Canal. (A cease-fire was declared two days later.)

In 1974, Democrat Ella T. Grasso was elected governor of Connecticut, becoming the first woman to win a gubernatorial office without succeeding her husband.

In 1985, Spencer W. Kimball, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, died at age 90; he was succeeded by Ezra Taft Benson.

In 1987, Supreme Court nominee Douglas H. Ginsburg admitted using marijuana several times in the 1960s and 70s, calling it a mistake. (Ginsburg ended up withdrawing his nomination.)

In 1990, Rabbi Meir Kahane (meh-EER’ kah-HAH’-nuh), the Brooklyn-born Israeli extremist, was shot to death at a New York hotel. (Egyptian native El Sayyed Nosair (el sah-EED’ no-sah-EER’) was convicted of the slaying in federal court.)

In 1992, Malice Green, a black motorist, died after he was struck in the head 14 times with a flashlight by a Detroit police officer, Larry Nevers, outside a suspected crack house. (Nevers and his partner, Walter Budzyn, were found guilty of second-degree murder, but the convictions were overturned; they were later convicted of involuntary manslaughter.)

In 1994, former President Ronald Reagan disclosed he had Alzheimer’s disease.

In 2009, a shooting rampage at the Fort Hood Army post in Texas left 13 people dead; Maj. Nidal Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, was later convicted of murder and sentenced to death.

Ten years ago: One day after being elected president, Barack Obama began filling out his new administration, selecting Illinois Rep. Rahm Emanuel to be White House chief of staff. A case of postelection nerves on Wall Street sent the Dow industrials plunging nearly 500 points.

Five years ago: Republican Gov. Chris Christie won a resounding re-election victory in Democratic-leaning New Jersey, while Democrat Terry McAuliffe prevailed in Virginia’s gubernatorial contest. Toronto Mayor Rob Ford acknowledged for the first time that he had smoked crack “probably a year ago” when he was in a “drunken stupor,” but he refused to resign despite immense pressure to step aside as leader of Canada’s largest city. India launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars; the Martian Orbiter Mission, or MOM, reached the red planet in Sept. 2014.

One year ago: A gunman armed with an assault rifle opened fire in a small South Texas church, killing more than two dozen people; the shooter, Devin Patrick Kelley, was later found dead in a vehicle after he was shot and chased by two men who heard the gunfire. (An autopsy revealed that he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.) President Donald Trump arrived in Japan for the start of a 12-day, five-country Asian trip. Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman to win the New York City Marathon since 1977; Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya was the men’s winner.

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