Capitals’ John Carlson takes Stanley Cup to Bethesda, raising $100K for childhood cancer

WASHINGTON — On his one day with the Stanley Cup, Capitals defenseman John Carlson showed it off in Bethesda for a worthy cause. Fans who made a donation to the Michael Mosier Defeat DIPG Foundation — which raises funds to fight brainstem cancer — got a chance to take photos with Carlson and the cup. See more photos.

On his one day with the Stanley Cup, Capitals defenseman John Carlson showed it off in Bethesda for a worthy cause. Fans who made a donation to the Michael Mosier Defeat DIPG Foundation — which raises funds to fight brainstem tumors — got a chance to take photos with Carlson and the cup. Jenny Mozier started the foundation in honor of her late son. In this photo, Carlson holds his son, joining Jenny Mozier and her family alongside the cup. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Capitals defenseman John Carlson hoists the Stanley Cup on stage at the Defeat DIPG Foundation. After visiting patients in Children’s Hospital, Carlson spent his afternoon with the cup in Bethesda, where fans made donations to see him and take photos with the Stanley Cup. The organization is committed to finding a cure for brainstem tumors known as diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG). (Courtesy Harry Greenspun) (Photographer: Harry Greenspun)
A week after Michael’s sixth birthday and his first day of kindergarten, Michael suddenly began complaining of double vision, and his right eye stopped moving and blinking normally. An MRI brought the tragic news that Michael had a tumor in his brainstem that was incurable, according to the foundation in his name. (Courtesy Michael Mozier Defeat DIPG Foundation)
Caps fans cheer and try to grab a photo of John Carlson as he walks offstage to greet those fans who donated $500 each to meet him and have their picture taken with the Stanley Cup. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Around 1,000 Capitals fans filled the cobblestone arcade in Bethesda Row, braving the soaring temperatures on Independence Day to see John Carlson and the Stanley Cup. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Capitals fans wrapped around the block to enter the VIP section where they could take a photo with John Carlson and the Stanley Cup. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Fans came from as far as Houston, Texas and Canada to see the Stanley Cup on July 4, 2018. (Courtesy Harry Greenspun) (Photographer: Harry Greenspun)
Fans began arriving for the event, that was planned in just 10 days, as early as 11 a.m. Carlson makes Bethesda, Maryland his home year-round. His wife, Gina, called and offered that on the one day he had it, they could bring the Stanley Cup by if the Moziers wanted to hold a fundraiser for the charity in their son’s name. (Courtesy Harry Greenspun) (Harry Greenspun)
Andrew Bird of Reston, Virgnia, celebrates with his friends with a Stanley Cup-shaped beer mug. General admission was $20 for the event which raised more than $100,000. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Fans of all ages stood in line for the afternoon event, hoping to catch a glimpse of the Stanley Cup. (Courtesy Harry Greenspun) (Photographer: Harry Greenspun)
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