Md. osprey welcome adopted chicks to nest

In this screengrab taken from the Chesapeake Conservancy's osprey cam, an adult osprey tends to two chicks in a nest along Kent Island, Maryland, Wednesday afternoon. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helped rescue two eggs from an endangered nest and once they hatched, transferred them to a pair of osprey known as Tom and Audrey.
In this screengrab taken from the Chesapeake Conservancy's osprey cam, an adult osprey tends to two chicks in a nest along Kent Island, Maryland, Wednesday afternoon. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helped rescue two eggs from an endangered nest and once they hatched, transferred them to a pair of osprey known as Tom and Audrey.
These two rescued osprey chicks were paired with a new mom and dad Wednesday. Tom and Audrey incubated several eggs of their own this year that did not hatch.
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WASHINGTON — A pair of Maryland osprey have adopted two chicks to raise after their own eggs didn’t hatch, according to the Chesapeake Conservancy.

The pair, known as Tom and Audrey, can be seen on the conservancy’s osprey cam raising the chicks along the shores of Kent Island.

The chicks originated from an endangered nest on a piling used by barges at Poplar Island. The eggs were transferred to a neighboring nest and were incubated along with several others until they hatched recently. The two rescued chicks were taken to Kent Island to meet their new mom and dad Wednesday.

Tom and Audrey tended to three eggs of their own all spring even though biologists knew no chicks would come from those eggs, according to the conservancy.

The conservancy says the pair has readily accepted their hatchlings.

Osprey mate for life and return to the Chesapeake each year to nest. These birds are considered an indicator of the overall health of the bay because they eat almost entirely fish and are sensitive to environmental contaminants.

Watch the hatchlings get to know their new parents on the conservancy’s osprey cam.

This article was written by WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters and republished with permission. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today.

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