Pockets of flash flooding could bring 2 to 4 inches of rain per hour Saturday night

Micaela Montelara plays as Korey Bissonnette runs with his son Max Bissonnette in the fountain at Georgetown Waterfront Park during a heatwave on August 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. – July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on August 13, 2021. The combined land- and ocean-surface temperature around the world, according to NOAA, was 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit (0.93°C) above the 20th century average of 60.4F (15.7°C) since record-keeping started 142 years ago. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

A woman walks with an umbrella at the U.S. Capitol building where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a third day in a row on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East have been generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A man walks with an umbrella at the U.S. Capitol building where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a third day in a row on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East have been generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Korey Bissonnette plays with his son Max Bissonnette in the fountain at Georgetown Waterfront Park during a heatwave on August 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. – July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on August 13, 2021. The combined land- and ocean-surface temperature around the world, according to NOAA, was 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit (0.93°C) above the 20th century average of 60.4F (15.7°C) since record-keeping started 142 years ago. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

People rest in the sunlight on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol building where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a third day in a row on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East have been generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Micaela Montelara plays in the fountain at Georgetown Waterfront Park during a heatwave on August 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. – July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on August 13, 2021. The combined land- and ocean-surface temperature around the world, according to NOAA, was 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit (0.93°C) above the 20th century average of 60.4F (15.7°C) since record-keeping started 142 years ago. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

People exercise on the National Mall as temperatures are expected to reach near 100 degrees Fahrenheit on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The DC metropolitan region is under a heat advisory as a third day of extreme heat and humidity hits the nation’s capital. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

People watch the sunrise from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial as temperatures are expected to reach near 100 degrees Fahrenheit on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The DC metropolitan region is under a heat advisory as a third day of extreme heat and humidity hits the nation’s capital. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A person cools off in the fountain at the World War II Memorial as temperatures are expected to reach near 100 degrees Fahrenheit on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The DC metropolitan region is under a heat advisory as a third day of extreme heat and humidity hits the nation’s capital. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

Kids cool down in a waterfall at Yards Park in Washington, D.C., Aug. 12, 2021, as an extreme heat wave hits the region. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP)

Kids cool down in the water at Yards Park in Washington, D.C., Aug. 12, 2021, as an extreme heat wave hits the region. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP)

A person rides their bike through a fountain as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. A recently released climate report from the United Nations predicts that the world will continue to warm with devastating heat waves, floods and fires becoming more frequent. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A woman puts her feet in the water at the National World War II Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., Aug. 12, 2021, as a heat wave continues in the area, with the National Weather Service issuing a heat advisory for extreme temperatures and high humidity. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP)

People walk along the National Mall as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. A recently released climate report from the United Nations predicts that the world will continue to warm with devastating heat waves, floods and fires becoming more frequent. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A child cools off in a fountain as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. A recently released climate report from the United Nations predicts that the world will continue to warm with devastating heat waves, floods and fires becoming more frequent. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A person sunbaths on the National Mall as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A man escapes the heat while sitting in the shadow cast by the Washington Monument on the National Mall where temperatures neared 100 degrees across the region for a second day in a row on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East are generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

With the U.S. Capitol in the background, tourists walk in the shadow cast by the Washington Monument on the National Mall where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a second day in a row on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

People cool off in the shade on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

People walk toward the Washington Monument on the National Mall where temperatures neared 100 degrees across the region for a second day in a row on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A person relaxes in the shade of a tree on the the National Mall as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

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As if record-breaking heat, torrential downpours and booming thunderstorms over the last several days isn’t enough, the weather Gods have more in store for the D.C. region to close out the week — a flash flood watch with the potential to bring pockets of 2 to 4 inches of rainfall an hour is in effect for the majority of the D.C. region Saturday night.

A flash flood warning has been issued for a large portion of the WTOP listening area — including D.C.; Prince George’s County in Maryland; and Arlington, Fairfax, Prince William counties as well as Alexandria in Virginia — until 3:15 a.m. Sunday.

Showers and thunderstorm are in the forecast as temperatures dip into the 60s in the suburbs and lower 70s in town overnight. The majority of the D.C. region is under a flash flood watch until 4 a.m.

StormTeam4 Meteorologist Steve Prinzivalli cautions drivers to turn around and find an alternate route if they come upon a flooded roadway.

“The main hazard with any thunderstorms will be very heavy rainfall,” Prinzivalli said. “Any thunderstorms that develop could contain heavy rainfall at the rate of two to four inches per hour, possibly leading to flash flooding. When you encounter a flooded road, turn around and find an alternate route.”

Damaging winds and frequent lightning are also a possibility, Storm Team4 Meteorologist Lauryn Ricketts said.

Temperatures should stay in the 80s throughout the evening before cooling off overnight.

Sunday will be cooler and drier. Northwesterly winds will start to dry out the area bringing in not just more seasonable temperatures, but also much more comfortable levels of humidity. But the cold front will stall nearby, so it will be considerably cloudy with the risk of a leftover shower or two.



Forecast

Saturday Night: A few showers and thunderstorms; any storms could have heavy rainfall and cause flash flooding. Highs: 80s.

Sunday: Storms diminishing before dawn. Mostly cloudy, cooler and less humid with a leftover shower or two. Highs: lower 80s.

Monday: Mostly cloudy with the risk of showers and thunderstorms. Highs: lower 80s

Tuesday and Wednesday: Mostly cloudy and warm with occasional showers and thunderstorms. Highs: mid-80s.

Current weather

Glynis Kazanjian

Glynis Kazanjian has been a freelance writer covering Maryland politics and government on the local, state and federal levels for the last 11 years. Her work is published in Maryland Matters, the Baltimore Post Examiner, Bethesda Beat and Md. Reporter. She has also worked as a true crime researcher.

Abigail Constantino

Abigail Constantino started her journalism career writing for a local newspaper in Fairfax County, Virginia. She is a graduate of American University and The George Washington University.

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