Ellicott City’s Main Street to reopen Thursday

WASHINGTON — More than two months after a flood tore through downtown Ellicott City, Maryland, city officials have announced that Main Street will reopen Thursday.

Howard County Executive Allan Kittleman and City Council Vice Chairman Jon Weinstein announced jointly on Wednesday morning that Main Street would reopen at 5 p.m. Thursday, “allowing pedestrian and vehicular traffic into the entire historic district for the first time since the July 30 flash flood,” Kittleman said in a statement.

Ellicott City got more than six inches of rain in about two hours on July 30, resulting in a flood that killed two people and caused extensive damage to houses, businesses and roads in the downtown area.

“Since that terrible night, we have made tremendous strides in rebuilding Ellicott City,” Kittleman said.

Tiber Alley will remain closed an extra day, reopening  at 5 p.m. Friday, to allow for extra repairs.

Access to portions of sidewalks, particularly on Main Street between Old Columbia Pike and Maryland Avenue, will still be restricted occasionally to allow for repair work, Kittleman said, and parking still won’t be allowed except for repair vehicles.

“Things are not back to normal and for a while to come, there will be construction and rebuilding underway,” Kittleman said in the statement.

“The community requests the patience of those who will be visiting Main Street since it remains an active construction zone.”

But two-way traffic will resume on Main Street and pedestrians will be able to walk around the area for the first time since the flood.

“It’s remarkable how resilient this community has been over these past 10 weeks as it has come together to clean up and rebuild,” Kittleman said.

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