Florida man accused of disrupting March for Our Lives

U.S. Park Police said Monday they arrested a 21-year-old for disrupting Saturday’s March for Our Lives rally on the National Mall.

Mitchell Martinez of Coral Gables, Florida, faces disorderly conduct charges for allegedly interfering with a permitted event.

The Washington Post reports that Martinez allegedly had yelled something during a moment of silence at Saturday’s rally. Martinez reportedly told authorities he yelled, “I am God.” But witnesses allege he yelled, “I have a gun.”



He also allegedly scaled a fence near the rally stage while holding a speaker, which was later thrown at the stage.

Authorities said six people suffered minor injuries as a result of the panic, including one juvenile.

In a statement Monday, police said they later found that Martinez was not armed and “posed no larger threat to the public.”

Jack Pointer

Jack contributes to WTOP.com when he's not working as the afternoon/evening radio writer. In a previous life, he helped edit The Dallas Morning News and Chicago Tribune.

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Demonstrators gather in D.C. for the second March for Our Lives rally on Saturday, June 11, 2022. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

A march participant holds a signs during the second March for Our Lives in D.C. on Saturday, June 11, 2022. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

March for Our Lives demonstrators call for action against gun violence. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

A photo of Madeleine Hsu, a victim of the Sandy Hook school shooting, is displayed during the second March for Our Lives in D.C. on Saturday, June 11, 2022. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

With the White House in the background, District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

District of Columbia Youth Mayor Addison Rose speaks during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Patricia Oliver, left, mother of Joaquin Oliver, one of the victims of the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., listens as Manuel Oliver, center, father of Joaquin, speaks during in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. Parkland survivor and activist David Hogg listens at right. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

People participate in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control in front of the Washington Monument, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

People duck down after a man tried and failed to rush the stage during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control in front of the Washington Monument, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Marisa Iuzzatto and her sone Cal Neaville participate in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control in front of the Washington Monument, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Randi Weingarten, American Federation of Teachers President, speaks to the crowd during in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Parkland survivor and activist X Gonzalez speaks to the crowd during in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

People hold signs in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control in front of the Washington Monument, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Karin LaBanca comforts two survivors of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary school after a man tried and failed to rush the stage during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Patricia Oliver, mother of Joaquin Oliver, one of the victims of the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., hugs gun violence survivors during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Yolanda King, granddaughter of Martin Luther King Jr., speaks during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

People display placards during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Parkland survivor and activist David Hogg speaks to the crowd during in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

People display placards during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)
People display placards during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

People display placards during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Parkland survivor and activist X Gonzalez speaks to the crowd during in the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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People display placards during the second March for Our Lives rally in support of gun control, Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Washington. The rally is a successor to the 2018 march organized by student protestors after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

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