Arlington Co. bans wild, exotic pets: See what’s prohibited

WASHINGTON — Arlington County, Virginia, is saying no to lions and tigers and bears — as pets.

A new amendment to the Arlington County code passed on Tuesday prohibits residents from keeping wild and exotic animals as pets.

“More than likely, we already know if somebody had a pet tiger,” said Chelsea Lindsey, a spokeswoman for the Animal Welfare League of Arlington. “This is not so that we can track you down, it’s just so that we know. So if there are issues going forward, we have an idea who has these animals.”

Residents who already have exotic animals in the banned lists should contact the Animal Welfare League of Arlington to sign up in a free registry in order to keep their pets.

The ban of wild and exotic animals does not include rabbits, rats, mice, ferrets, hamsters, gerbils, chinchillas, hedgehogs, sugar gliders, guinea pigs and nonvenomous snakes. It does, however, include new standards for the care, handling and enclosure for snakes that weigh more than 25 pounds.

“Keeping wild and exotic animals as pets out of their native environment typically isn’t what’s best for the animal or for community members,” said Kurt Larrick from Arlington County’s Department of Human Services. “The driving force behind all of this has been the community. It was Arlington residents who came forward to ask for stronger protections for wild and exotic animals.”

The ban on wild and exotic animals is already law in neighboring jurisdictions and at the state level.

Below are all the animals that are prohibited under the new Arlington code.

FILE - In this Dec. 31, 2015, file photo, Tsunami, an eleven year old female Sumatran Orangutan eats fruit during her birthday celebration at the National Zoo Ape Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Primates are heading toward an extinction crisis, a new international study warns. And it’s our fault that our closest biological relatives are in trouble, scientists said. About 60 percent of the more than 500 primate species, such as gorillas, monkeys and lemurs, are “now threatened with extinction” and three out of four primate species have shrinking populations, according to a study by 31 primate experts published in the Jan. 18, 2017, journal Science Advances. . (AP Photo/Joshua Paul, File)
Primates  (AP Photo/Joshua Paul, File)
(Getty Images/iStockphoto/Anolis01)
Raccoons (Getty Images/iStockphoto/Anolis01) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/Anolis01)
15710848762_44ab3a88e9_o.jpg
Skunks (Clyde Nishimura/Smithsonian’s National Zoo)
FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo, a gray wolf is seen at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. A federal appeals court Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, retained federal protection for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region, ruling that the government acted prematurely when it dropped them from the endangered species list. (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, File)
Wolves or wolf hybrids (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, File) (AP/Dawn Villella)
Western Coyote (Canis latrans) in northern California
Coyotes (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/SteveByland)
iStock/Thinkstock
Squirrels (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
Red Fox - Vulpes vulpes, sitting up at attention, direct eye contact, a little snow in its face, tree bokeh in background
Foxes (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/RT-Images)
In this Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, photo, Georgina, an endangered snow leopard, watches as her new twin cubs play in their enclosure during their public debut at the Los Angeles Zoo, in California. The elusive snow leopard _ long considered an endangered species _ has been upgraded to "vulnerable," international conservationists said Thursday. But experts warned the new classification does not mean the big cats are safe. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
Leopards (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) (AP/Richard Vogel)
A panther reacts from its enclosure at the zoo in Ahmadabad, India, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
Panthers (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Ajit Solanki)
Jai, a Sumatran Tiger, sits in a pool to keep cool at the Phoenix Zoo, Monday, June 19, 2017 in Phoenix, Ariz. The forecast calls for a high of 118 on Monday and 120 on Tuesday in Phoenix.  (AP Photo/Matt York)
 Tigers (AP Photo/Matt York) (AP/Matt York)
A lion sits inside a cage at the former Buenos Aires Zoo in Argentina, Friday, July 1, 2016. The city government announced last week it will transform the city's zoo into an ecological park for a limited number of species, and begin with the transfer of birds of prey to natural reserves. Their plan to also transform the current site into a conservation and research facility will take years while veterinarians decide which animals can be transferred to local reserves and abroad. Those who stay at the ecological park will live in what officials describe as much better conditions. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
Lions (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) (AP)
AP366370510040.jpg
Bears and other warm-blooded animals typically found in the wild (AP Photo/Chicago Zoological Society, Jim Schulz) (AP)
This photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo shows Ollie, a female bobcat the the zoo. Ollie, who escaped from its enclosure at the National Zoo in Washington, is perfectly capable of surviving in the wild and would find plenty to eat in Rock Creek Park if it wanted to stay there, zoo officials said. The female bobcat, believed to be about 7 years old, was found to be missing Monday, Jan. 30, 2017,  morning when it didn’t show up for breakfast.  (Barbara Statas/Smithsonian's National Zoo via AP)
Wildcats (including hybrids — bobcats, lynxes and caracals)  (Barbara Statas/Smithsonian’s National Zoo via AP) (Barbara Statas/Smithsonian's National Zoo via AP)
This is an Ostrich on display at the Pittsburgh Zoo in Pittsburgh, Tuesday, March 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
Ratites (flightless birds) (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) (AP/Gene J. Puskar)
iStock/Thinkstock
Alligators and crocodiles (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
A timber rattlesnake sits coiled on section of a trail in Mountaintown, Ga., Wednesday, May 23, 2007. Fortunately Maryland and Northern Virginia is home to only two types of poisonous snakes, the timber rattlesnake and the copperhead. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Venomous snakes and reptiles (AP Photo/John Bazemore) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/John Bazemore)
Mike L. Baird/Getty
Scorpions (except those in the genus Pandinus) (Mike L. Baird/Getty)
Centipede in front of white background
Centipedes of the scolopendra genus (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/GlobalP)
A black widow spider walks on a mirror in a garage at a home in Great Falls, Mont., on Monday, Nov. 5, 2007. (AP Photo/Great Falls Tribune, Robin Loznak)
The following spiders: widow spiders, recluse spiders, funnel-web spiders, banana or wandering spiders, trapdoor spiders, sand spiders and tarantulas (including the Mexican redknee tarantula) (AP Photo/Great Falls Tribune, Robin Loznak) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Robin Loznak)
(1/19)
FILE - In this Dec. 31, 2015, file photo, Tsunami, an eleven year old female Sumatran Orangutan eats fruit during her birthday celebration at the National Zoo Ape Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Primates are heading toward an extinction crisis, a new international study warns. And it’s our fault that our closest biological relatives are in trouble, scientists said. About 60 percent of the more than 500 primate species, such as gorillas, monkeys and lemurs, are “now threatened with extinction” and three out of four primate species have shrinking populations, according to a study by 31 primate experts published in the Jan. 18, 2017, journal Science Advances. . (AP Photo/Joshua Paul, File)
(Getty Images/iStockphoto/Anolis01)
15710848762_44ab3a88e9_o.jpg
FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo, a gray wolf is seen at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. A federal appeals court Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, retained federal protection for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region, ruling that the government acted prematurely when it dropped them from the endangered species list. (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, File)
Western Coyote (Canis latrans) in northern California
iStock/Thinkstock
Red Fox - Vulpes vulpes, sitting up at attention, direct eye contact, a little snow in its face, tree bokeh in background
In this Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, photo, Georgina, an endangered snow leopard, watches as her new twin cubs play in their enclosure during their public debut at the Los Angeles Zoo, in California. The elusive snow leopard _ long considered an endangered species _ has been upgraded to "vulnerable," international conservationists said Thursday. But experts warned the new classification does not mean the big cats are safe. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
A panther reacts from its enclosure at the zoo in Ahmadabad, India, Tuesday, May 5, 2009. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
Jai, a Sumatran Tiger, sits in a pool to keep cool at the Phoenix Zoo, Monday, June 19, 2017 in Phoenix, Ariz. The forecast calls for a high of 118 on Monday and 120 on Tuesday in Phoenix.  (AP Photo/Matt York)
A lion sits inside a cage at the former Buenos Aires Zoo in Argentina, Friday, July 1, 2016. The city government announced last week it will transform the city's zoo into an ecological park for a limited number of species, and begin with the transfer of birds of prey to natural reserves. Their plan to also transform the current site into a conservation and research facility will take years while veterinarians decide which animals can be transferred to local reserves and abroad. Those who stay at the ecological park will live in what officials describe as much better conditions. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
AP366370510040.jpg
This photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo shows Ollie, a female bobcat the the zoo. Ollie, who escaped from its enclosure at the National Zoo in Washington, is perfectly capable of surviving in the wild and would find plenty to eat in Rock Creek Park if it wanted to stay there, zoo officials said. The female bobcat, believed to be about 7 years old, was found to be missing Monday, Jan. 30, 2017,  morning when it didn’t show up for breakfast.  (Barbara Statas/Smithsonian's National Zoo via AP)
This is an Ostrich on display at the Pittsburgh Zoo in Pittsburgh, Tuesday, March 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
iStock/Thinkstock
A timber rattlesnake sits coiled on section of a trail in Mountaintown, Ga., Wednesday, May 23, 2007. Fortunately Maryland and Northern Virginia is home to only two types of poisonous snakes, the timber rattlesnake and the copperhead. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Mike L. Baird/Getty
Centipede in front of white background
A black widow spider walks on a mirror in a garage at a home in Great Falls, Mont., on Monday, Nov. 5, 2007. (AP Photo/Great Falls Tribune, Robin Loznak)

WTOP’s Megan Cloherty contributed to this report. 


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