Protesters marching from Charlottesville reach finish line in DC

Protesters marched for about three days in rain to reach D.C. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
A 10-day protest march from Charlottesville to D.C. reached the finish line when soggy-wet demonstrators arrived, in a driving rain, at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
While protesters walked various legs of the more-than-100-mile route from Charlottesville, a large crowd joined the group of marchers from Rosslyn to D.C. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

Several activist groups took part in the march, including the Working Families Party, Action Group Network and Color of Change. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Several activist groups took part in the march, including the Working Families Party, Action Group Network and Color of Change. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

A 10-day protest march from Charlottesville to D.C. reached the finish line when soggy-wet demonstrators arrived, in a driving rain, at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
A 10-day protest march from Charlottesville to D.C. reached the finish line when soggy-wet demonstrators arrived, in a driving rain, at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

While protesters walked various legs of the more-than-100-mile route from Charlottesville, a large crowd joined the small band of marchers for the final few miles from Rosslyn into D.C. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
While protesters walked various legs of the more-than-100-mile route from Charlottesville, a large crowd joined the small band of marchers for the final few miles from Rosslyn into D.C. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

While protesters walked various legs of the more-than-100-mile route from Charlottesville, a large crowd joined the small band of marchers for the final few miles from Rosslyn into D.C. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Among the marchers’ demands are the removal of President Donald Trump from office. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

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A 10-day protest march from Charlottesville to D.C. reached the finish line when soggy-wet demonstrators arrived, in a driving rain, at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Several activist groups took part in the march, including the Working Families Party, Action Group Network and Color of Change. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
A 10-day protest march from Charlottesville to D.C. reached the finish line when soggy-wet demonstrators arrived, in a driving rain, at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
While protesters walked various legs of the more-than-100-mile route from Charlottesville, a large crowd joined the small band of marchers for the final few miles from Rosslyn into D.C. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
While protesters walked various legs of the more-than-100-mile route from Charlottesville, a large crowd joined the small band of marchers for the final few miles from Rosslyn into D.C. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

WASHINGTON — A 10-day protest march from Charlottesville, Virginia, to D.C. reached the finish line Wednesday when soaked demonstrators arrived, in a driving rain, at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial.

Organizers said the march was in protest of a white nationalist rally that turned deadly in Charlottesville on Aug. 12.

While protesters walked various legs of the more-than-100-mile route from Charlottesville, a large crowd joined the small band of marchers for the final few miles from Rosslyn into the District.

The marchers’ spirits seemed high, despite the drenching rain.

“We’ve marched through rain. I think this is our third day of rain, on sidewalks, off sidewalks, on highways. Our message of confronting white supremacy is so much more important than this weather,” said Tracey Corder of Oakland, California.

Among the marchers’ demands is the removal of President Donald Trump from office.

Several activist groups took part in the march, including the Working Families Party, Action Group Network and Color of Change.

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