Who would you vote for? The social effort to put a woman on the $20 bill

A portrait of Sojourner Truth circa 1864. The caption reads "I sell the shadows to support the substance." (Library of Congress)
Sojourner Truth A portrait of Sojourner Truth circa 1864. The caption reads, “I sell the shadows to support the substance.” She was an activist and speaker who supported women’s rights and abolition of slavery. She was born a slave but escaped, and in 1864 she met President Abraham Lincoln at the White House. (Library of Congress) (Library of Congress)
This portrait of Harriet Tubman was taken between 1860 and 1875. The caption notes she was a nurse, spy and scout. (Library of Congress)
Harriet Tubman This portrait of Harriet Tubman was taken between 1860 and 1875. The caption notes she was a nurse, spy and scout. According to The Associated Press, she was born into slavery but escaped to Philadelphia in 1849, and provided valuable intelligence to Union forces during the Civil War. She was born in Dorcester County, Maryland. (Library of Congress) (Library of Congress)
** FILE ** Clara Barton, who is well-known for her service on the battlefields during the Civil War and for her work establishing the American Red Cross, is seen in this undated black and white file photo. A virtual time capsule of Barton memorabilia was discovered by a government carpenter in 1997.  (AP Photo/National Archives)
Clara Barton Clara Barton, who is well-known for her service on the battlefields during the Civil War and for her work establishing the American Red Cross, is seen in this undated black-and-white file photo. (AP Photo/National Archives) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
Shown in an undated photo are head and shoulder shots of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Mrs. Stanton helped organized the world?s first women?s rights convention which met in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. She became first President of National Women?s Suffrage Association and held that office from 1869-1890. (AP Photo)
Elizabeth Cady Stanton Shown in this undated photo is Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Stanton helped organized the world’s first women’s rights convention, which met in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848. She became first president of the National Women’s Suffrage Association and held that office from 1869-1890. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Susan B. Anthony This portrait of Susan B. Anthony was taken sometime between 1890 and 1906. She and Elizabeth Cady Stanton worked together to fight for women’s suffrage. Together, they formed the American Equal Rights Association. (Library of Congress) (Library of Congress)
Alice Paul, Chairman of the Nation Women's Party, takes up needle & thread to put the last stitch in the suffrage banner which now has 36 stars representing the 36 states which ratified the suffrage amendment. circa 1932. (AP Photo)
Alice Paul Alice Paul, chair of the National Women’s Party, takes up needle and thread to put the last stitch in the suffrage banner, which now has 36 stars representing the 36 states which ratified the suffrage amendment. Photo circa 1932. (AP Photo) (AP)
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt joined her guests  as she entertained at a Garden Party on June 12, 1942  in Washington at the south lawn of the White House for the over 400 soldiers detailed to guard the executive mansion. They were watching an entertainer. (AP Photo)
Eleanor Roosevelt First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt joined her guests as she entertained at a Garden Party on June 12, 1942, in Washington at the south lawn of the White House for the more than 400 soldiers detailed to guard the executive mansion. They were watching an entertainer. During her time in the White House, she focused on the needs of children, laborers and minority groups. Later, she served as a delegate to the United Nations and championed human rights. (AP Photo) (AP/Anonymous)
Mrs. Rosa Parks and E.D. Nixon, left, former president of the Alabama NAACP, arrive at court in Montgomery March 19, 1956 for the trial in the racial bus boycott.  Mrs. Parks was fined $14 on Dec. 5 for failing to move to the segregated section of a city bus.  The boycott started on the day she was fined.  There were 91 other defendants. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)
Rosa Parks Rosa Parks, right, and E.D. Nixon, left, former president of the Alabama NAACP, arrive at court in Montgomery March 19, 1956, for the trial in the racial bus boycott. Mrs. Parks was fined $14 on Dec. 5, 1955, for failing to move to the segregated section of a city bus. The boycott started on the day she was fined. There were 91 other defendants. Her actions made her a symbol of the Civil Rights era. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick) (AP/GENE HERRICK)
Frances Perkins, who celebrated her 70th birthday last April, is about to step out of a Washington career that began in 1933. She has prepared her formal resignation as one of the three members of the Civil Service Commission. She served as Secretary of Labor from March 1933 to June 1945. At left, she is shown about the time when she returned from an International Labor Organization Conference at Geneva in 1952. (AP Photo)
Frances Perkins Frances Perkins served as Secretary of Labor from March 1933 to June 1945. She was the first woman to hold a Cabinet position. Here she is shown about the time when she returned from an International Labor Organization Conference at Geneva in 1952. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Holding her controversial book "Silent Spring," Rachel Carson stands in her library in Silver Springs, Md. on March 14, 1963.  She says she "wanted to bring to public attention"  her charges that pestacides are destroying wildlife and endangering the environment.  (AP Photo)
Rachel Carson Holding her controversial book “Silent Spring,” Rachel Carson stands in her library in Silver Spring, Maryland, on March 14, 1963. She says she “wanted to bring to public attention” to her charges that pesticides were destroying wildlife and endangering the environment. Her book led to the study of pesticides. (AP Photo) (AP/RHS)
FILE - This May 1961 file photo renowned birth control pioneer Margaret Sanger is seen in New York. Sanger began her crusade back in 1912 when she was working on the lower east side of New York and saw women resorting to back alley, illegal abortions. One too many of these women died in her arms and she said "Enough." Sanger, together with philanthropist Katharine McCormick, bankrolled the work of Gregory Pincus, the man Sanger convinced to develop the pill. America's favorite birth control method turns 50 on Sunday, May 9, 2010. (AP Photo/File)
Margaret Sanger In this May 1961 file photo, renowned birth control pioneer Margaret Sanger is seen in New York. Sanger began her crusade back in 1912 when she was working on the lower east side of New York and saw women resorting to back-alley, illegal abortions. One too many of these women died in her arms, and she said “Enough.” Sanger, together with philanthropist Katharine McCormick, bankrolled the work of Gregory Pincus, the man Sanger convinced to develop the Pill. America’s favorite birth control method turned 50 in 2010. (AP Photo/File) (AP/Anonymous)
Shirley Chisholm, Democratic Congresswoman seeking the nomination for president, makes a point during a speech in San Francisco on Tuesday, May 16, 1972.   Under close guard from the secret service, Mrs. Chisholm was addressing the Commonwealth Club luncheon where she asked "How many more assassinations..before we realize the need to control weapons."   (AP Photo/ Richard Drew)
Shirley Chisholm In this file photo, Shirley Chisholm, Democratic congresswoman seeking the nomination for president, makes a point during a speech in San Francisco on Tuesday, May 16, 1972. She was the first African-American woman elected to Congress. As a member of the House of Representatives, she represented Brooklyn, New York. (AP Photo/ Richard Drew) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Richard Drew)
Women's rights activist Betty Friedan addresses a conference on "Women: A Political Force" at the State Assembly chamber in Albany, N.Y. on Nov. 13, 1971. The two-day conference was called by the women's unit of the governor's office to stimulate and unite New York State women to increase the effectiveness of their political power. (AP Photo)
Betty Friedan Women’s rights activist Betty Friedan addresses a conference on “Women: A Political Force” at the State Assembly chamber in Albany, N.Y. on Nov. 13, 1971. The two-day conference was called by the women’s unit of the governor’s office to stimulate and unite New York State women to increase the effectiveness of their political power. Her manifesto “The Feminine Mystique” became a best-seller in the 1960s and laid the groundwork for the modern feminist movement. (AP Photo) (AP)
FILE - In this July 12, 1976, file photo, Rep. Barbara Jordan of Texas waves as she speaks to the Democratic National Convention in New York City. Clint Eastwood gave the Republicans some offbeat remarks to remember in 2012. Will the Democrats come up with any memorable lines? Some past Democratic convention speeches that live on include Jordan becoming the first black and first woman to deliver the party's keynote address: "My presence here is one additional bit of evidence that the American Dream need not be forever deferred," she said. (AP Photo/File)
Barbara Jordan In this July 12, 1976, file photo, Rep. Barbara Jordan, of Texas, waves as she speaks to the Democratic National Convention in New York City. Jordan was the first black and first woman to deliver the party’s keynote address: “My presence here is one additional bit of evidence that the American dream need not be forever deferred,” she said. According to the campaign Women on 20s, Jordan was the first black woman from the Deep South elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. (AP Photo/File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Uncredited)
FILE - In this Sept. 19, 1996 file photo, Wilma Mankiller, former Cherokee Nation chief, speaks during a news conference  in Tulsa, Okla. Mankiller, was one of the few women ever to lead a major American Indian tribe, died Tuesday April 6, 2010 after battling pancreatic cancer. She was 64. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)
Wilma Mankiller In this Sept. 19, 1996 file photo, Wilma Mankiller, former Cherokee Nation chief, speaks during a news conference in Tulsa, Okla. Mankiller was one of the few women ever to lead a major American Indian tribe. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/MICHAEL WYKE)
Rep. Patsy Mink, D-Hawaii takes part in a hearing of the House Education and the Workforce Committee hearing on the whether to issue subpoenas on the 1996 Teamsters elections. (AP Photo/Karin Cooper)
Patsy Mink Rep. Patsy Mink, D-Hawaii, takes part in a House Education and the Workforce Committee hearing on the whether to issue subpoenas on the 1996 Teamsters elections. She cowrote and sponsored the education law amendment better known today as Title IX, which ensures women and girls have equal opportunities in education. The law also opened up athletics to female students. (AP Photo/Karin Cooper) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/KARIN COOPER)
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A portrait of Sojourner Truth circa 1864. The caption reads "I sell the shadows to support the substance." (Library of Congress)
This portrait of Harriet Tubman was taken between 1860 and 1875. The caption notes she was a nurse, spy and scout. (Library of Congress)
** FILE ** Clara Barton, who is well-known for her service on the battlefields during the Civil War and for her work establishing the American Red Cross, is seen in this undated black and white file photo. A virtual time capsule of Barton memorabilia was discovered by a government carpenter in 1997.  (AP Photo/National Archives)
Shown in an undated photo are head and shoulder shots of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Mrs. Stanton helped organized the world?s first women?s rights convention which met in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. She became first President of National Women?s Suffrage Association and held that office from 1869-1890. (AP Photo)
Alice Paul, Chairman of the Nation Women's Party, takes up needle & thread to put the last stitch in the suffrage banner which now has 36 stars representing the 36 states which ratified the suffrage amendment. circa 1932. (AP Photo)
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt joined her guests  as she entertained at a Garden Party on June 12, 1942  in Washington at the south lawn of the White House for the over 400 soldiers detailed to guard the executive mansion. They were watching an entertainer. (AP Photo)
Mrs. Rosa Parks and E.D. Nixon, left, former president of the Alabama NAACP, arrive at court in Montgomery March 19, 1956 for the trial in the racial bus boycott.  Mrs. Parks was fined $14 on Dec. 5 for failing to move to the segregated section of a city bus.  The boycott started on the day she was fined.  There were 91 other defendants. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)
Frances Perkins, who celebrated her 70th birthday last April, is about to step out of a Washington career that began in 1933. She has prepared her formal resignation as one of the three members of the Civil Service Commission. She served as Secretary of Labor from March 1933 to June 1945. At left, she is shown about the time when she returned from an International Labor Organization Conference at Geneva in 1952. (AP Photo)
Holding her controversial book "Silent Spring," Rachel Carson stands in her library in Silver Springs, Md. on March 14, 1963.  She says she "wanted to bring to public attention"  her charges that pestacides are destroying wildlife and endangering the environment.  (AP Photo)
FILE - This May 1961 file photo renowned birth control pioneer Margaret Sanger is seen in New York. Sanger began her crusade back in 1912 when she was working on the lower east side of New York and saw women resorting to back alley, illegal abortions. One too many of these women died in her arms and she said "Enough." Sanger, together with philanthropist Katharine McCormick, bankrolled the work of Gregory Pincus, the man Sanger convinced to develop the pill. America's favorite birth control method turns 50 on Sunday, May 9, 2010. (AP Photo/File)
Shirley Chisholm, Democratic Congresswoman seeking the nomination for president, makes a point during a speech in San Francisco on Tuesday, May 16, 1972.   Under close guard from the secret service, Mrs. Chisholm was addressing the Commonwealth Club luncheon where she asked "How many more assassinations..before we realize the need to control weapons."   (AP Photo/ Richard Drew)
Women's rights activist Betty Friedan addresses a conference on "Women: A Political Force" at the State Assembly chamber in Albany, N.Y. on Nov. 13, 1971. The two-day conference was called by the women's unit of the governor's office to stimulate and unite New York State women to increase the effectiveness of their political power. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this July 12, 1976, file photo, Rep. Barbara Jordan of Texas waves as she speaks to the Democratic National Convention in New York City. Clint Eastwood gave the Republicans some offbeat remarks to remember in 2012. Will the Democrats come up with any memorable lines? Some past Democratic convention speeches that live on include Jordan becoming the first black and first woman to deliver the party's keynote address: "My presence here is one additional bit of evidence that the American Dream need not be forever deferred," she said. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Sept. 19, 1996 file photo, Wilma Mankiller, former Cherokee Nation chief, speaks during a news conference  in Tulsa, Okla. Mankiller, was one of the few women ever to lead a major American Indian tribe, died Tuesday April 6, 2010 after battling pancreatic cancer. She was 64. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke)
Rep. Patsy Mink, D-Hawaii takes part in a hearing of the House Education and the Workforce Committee hearing on the whether to issue subpoenas on the 1996 Teamsters elections. (AP Photo/Karin Cooper)

WASHINGTON – It started as a revelation and is now a full-blown movement on social media.

Women across the country, including actresses such as Susan Sarandon, are taking selfies with President Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill and sharing their photos on social media in support of an effort to put a woman’s face on the bill.

 

Susan Ades Stone, of Women on the 20s, says founder Barbara Ortiz Howard realized when rifling through her wallet at a coffee shop that there were no women on any U.S. paper money. What she didn’t initially realize was how simple the codes that govern the money are.

“It does not have to be a president or a founding father. It can be someone who has done something great and should be recognized,” Ades Stone says.

In fact, she says, the qualifications are merely that the person be deceased at least two years, have lived a life of great stature and be recognizable to the public.

“The treasury secretary has it within his power to make decisions on redesign,” Ades Stone says.

And while Ades Stone says the $20 note is up for redesign to keep up with counterfeiting technology and the U.S. Department of Treasury has allocated the money to pay for that, it’s a lengthy process.

“So we’re starting now, and we really believe that this is something the public should be involved in,” she says.

On the Women on the 20s website, you can vote for three of your favorite women leaders in American history, including Rosa Parks, Eleanor Roosevelt and Susan B. Anthony.

They’re hoping to get one of 16 candidates printed on the $20 bill by 2020, marking the centennial of the women’s suffrage movement.

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