Mississippi capital: Water everywhere, not a drop to drink

Water_Woes_Mississippi_66477 Rajwinder Singh, a gas station/convenience store owner, pats into place the 15 cases of drinking water he purchased from a Kroger grocery store into his vehicle, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in Jackson, Miss. Parts of Jackson were without running water Tuesday because recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. The state Health Department put Mississippi's capital city under a boil-water notice in late July.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_63268 Rajwinder Singh carries a case of drinking water to his vehicle, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, after purchasing 15 cases from a Kroger grocery store for his convenience store in Jackson, Miss. Parts of Jackson were without running water Tuesday because recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. The city already been under a boil-water notice for a month because the Health Department found cloudy water that could cause digestive problems.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_47708 A Kroger customer places a case of drinking water into her vehicle, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in Jackson, Miss. Parts of Jackson were without running water Tuesday because recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. The state Health Department put Mississippi's capital city under a boil-water notice in late July.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_60961 Rajwinder Singh, a gas station/convenience store owner, prepares to load one of the 15 cases of drinking water he purchased from a Kroger grocery store into his vehicle, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in Jackson, Miss. Parts of Jackson were without running water Tuesday because recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_86902 Recruits for the Jackson, Miss., Fire Department place cases of bottled water in a resident's car, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_58601 Area residents line up at the city's downtown fire station to receive bottled water, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of Jackson, Miss., response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes-Mississippi_37675 Jackson, Miss., Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba addresses the city's partnership with the state to help address the water crisis in the Capital city during a news conference in Jackson Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. On Monday, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves announced state assistance to help with Jackson's water issues.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_18421 Derek Emerson, co-owner of Walker's Drive-In, speaks about the challenges he and many restaurants and small businesses face daily in Jackson, Miss., due to longstanding water system problems, including cloudiness and low pressure, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. Emerson rented a 500 gallon tank as a backup which will provide the restaurant with water for cleaning dishes and bathroom use only. Recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_70672 Customers at Walker's Drive In, are provided bottled drinking water and imported ice, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in Jackson, Miss. The restaurant is one of many businesses that face the city's longstanding water system problems, including cloudiness and low pressure. Recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants and the state Health Department has had Mississippi's capital city under a boil-water notice since late July.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_43856 Pallets loaded with cases of water are unloaded at a Kroger grocery store in north Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. The grocery chain and other stores are facing the challenges of the city's longstanding water system problems, by making more drinking water available for its customers. Recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants and the state Health Department has had Mississippi's capital city under a boil-water notice since late July.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_63071 Many customers at this Kroger grocery store in north Jackson, Miss., carry out a couple of cases of drinking water, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. The grocery chain and other stores are facing the challenges of the city's longstanding water system problems, by making more drinking water available for its customers. Recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants and the state Health Department has had Mississippi's capital city under a boil-water notice since late July.
Water_Woes-Mississippi_53281 Jackson, Miss., Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba addresses the city's partnership with the state to help address the water crisis in the Capital city during a news conference in Jackson Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. On Monday, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves announced state assistance to help with Jackson's water issues.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_13280 Derek Emerson, co-owner of Walker's Drive-In, speaks about the challenges he and many restaurants and small businesses face daily in Jackson, Miss., due to longstanding water system problems, including cloudiness and low pressure, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. Recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants and the state Health Department has had Mississippi's capital city under a boil-water notice in late July.
Water_Woes-Mississippi_31554 Jackson, Miss., Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba addresses the city's partnership with the state to help address the water crisis in the Capital city during a news conference in Jackson Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. On Monday, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves announced state assistance to help with Jackson's water issues.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_17098 Walker's Drive-In, a popular mid-city eatery in Jackson, Miss., has loaded up with bottles of drinking water and pre-made tea, in an effort to handle their customers orders, during the latest challenges due to longstanding water system problems in Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022. Recent flooding worsened problems in one of two water-treatment plants and the state Health Department has had Mississippi's capital city under a boil-water notice since late July.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_82437 Firefighters and recruits for the Jackson, Miss., Fire Department carry cases of bottled water to residents vehicles, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_52320 A Jackson, Miss., Fire Department firefighter puts cases of bottled water in a resident's SUV, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_89823 A recruit for the Jackson, Miss., Fire Department carries a case of bottled water to a resident's car, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_63958 Recruits for the Jackson, Miss., Fire Department place cases of bottled water in a resident's car, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_30688 A recruit for the Jackson, Miss., Fire Department puts cases of bottled water in a resident's truck, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
Water_Woes_Mississippi_32493 A recruit for the Jackson, Miss., Fire Department puts cases of bottled water in a resident's truck, Aug. 18, 2022, as part of the city's response to longstanding water system problems. On Monday, Aug. 29, 2022, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said he's declaring a state of emergency after excessive rainfall worsened problems in one of Jackson’s already troubled water-treatment plants.
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JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi’s capital city is grappling with multiple water problems — there’s been too much on the ground after heavy rainfall in the past week, and not enough safe water coming through the pipes for people to use.

Parts of Jackson were without running water Tuesday because flooding exacerbated longstanding problems in one of two water-treatment plants. The city of 150,000 had already been under a boil-water notice for a month because the Health Department found cloudy water that could cause digestive problems. Long lines have formed each day for limited supplies of bottled water at distribution sites.

Restaurant owner Derek Emerson told The Associated Press on Tuesday that water problems “are making it impossible for us to do business in Jackson, Mississippi.” Emerson and his wife, Jennifer, own the upscale Walker’s Drive-In, and he said they have been spending $300 a day for ice and bottled water in the past month.

“I love doing business in Jackson, and I like the people of Jackson,” Emerson said. “I just — I hate dealing with the problems.”

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves declared a state of emergency for Jackson’s water system on Tuesday. The state will try to help resolve problems by hiring contractors to work at the treatment plant, which was operating at diminished capacity with backup pumps after the main pumps failed “some time ago,” Reeves said.

And President Joe Biden approved an emergency declaration request for the state of Mississippi, directing his administration to surge federal assistance to the region, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre tweeted late Tuesday.

Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba said Jackson’s water system is troubled by short staffing and “decades of deferred maintenance.” He said the influx of water from torrential rain changed the chemical composition needed for treatment, which slowed the process of pushing water out to customers.

Lumumba is Democrat and was not invited to the Republican governor’s Monday night news conference. Although the two politicians are often at odds, Lumumba said Tuesday that he’s having productive discussions with the Health Department and the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and he’s grateful for the state’s help.

Like many cities, Jackson faces water system problems it can’t afford to fix. Its tax base has eroded the past few decades as the population decreased — the result of mostly white flight to suburbs that began after public schools integrated in 1970. The city’s population is now more than 80% Black, with about 25% of its residents living in poverty.

Low water pressure left some people unable to take showers or flush toilets and officials said the low pressure caused concern for firefighting. Those who did have water flowing from the tap were told to boil it to kill bacteria that could make them sick.

Jackson schools held classes online Tuesday and Wednesday, and some restaurants closed. Jackson State University brought in temporary restrooms for students, and Jackson State football coach Deion Sanders said the water crisis left his players without air conditioning or ice at their practice facility. In a video that one of his sons posted to social media, Sanders — also known as Coach Prime — said he wanted to move players into a hotel so they could shower.

“We’re going to find somewhere to practice, find somewhere that can accommodate every durn thing that we need and desire to be who we desire to be, and that’s dominate,” Sanders said. “The devil is a lie. He ain’t going to get us today, baby.”

The problems at the water treatment plant came after the city appeared to largely avoid widespread flooding from a Pearl River swollen by days of heavy rain. One home was flooded Monday but the mayor said the water did not rise as high as expected. Earlier projections showed about 100 to 150 buildings in the Jackson area faced possible flooding.

The National Weather Service said the Pearl River crested Monday short of the major flood stage level of 36 feet (10.97 meters). Parts of Jackson flooded in 2020 after the river topped that level.

Jackson has two water-treatment plants, and the larger one is near a reservoir that provides most of the city’s water supply. The reservoir also has a role in flood control.

The mayor said Monday that low water pressure could last a few days, but by Tuesday he said some customers were regaining service.

“We have seen steady improvements in the system,” Lumumba said.

Jackson has longstanding problems with its water system. A cold snap in 2021 left a significant number of people without running water after pipes froze. Similar problems happened again early this year, on a smaller scale.

Lumumba said last week that fixing Jackson’s water system could cost $200 million, but Tuesday he said the cost could run to “quite possibly the billions of dollars.” Mississippi is receiving $75 million to address water problems as part of a bipartisan infrastructure bill.

Jackson resident Bernard Smith said he filled containers with water Monday night in case his home lost service. He bought bottled water Tuesday and said he hopes Jackson is on track to solve its water woes.

“Sometimes you’ve to go through the hardship to get back to the good ship,” Smith said.

Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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