Today in History: Oct. 6

American actor and singer Al Jolson with his wife Ruby after their arrival at Cherbourg Harbour, France, on Aug. 29, 1928. (AP Photo)
In 1927, the era of talking pictures arrived with the opening of “The Jazz Singer” starring Al Jolson, a movie featuring both silent and sound-synchronized sequences. Here, Jolson is pictured with his wife Ruby after their arrival at Cherbourg Harbour, France, on Aug. 29, 1928. (AP Photo) (AP)
Adolf Hitler, front, salutes parading troops of the German Wehrmacht in Warsaw, Poland, on Oct. 5, 1939 after the German invasion. Behind Hitler are seen, from left to right: Army Commander in Chief, Colonel General Walther von Brauchitsch, new commandant of Warsaw, Lieutenant General Friedrich von Cochenhausen, Colonel General Gerd von Rundstedt, Colonel General Wilhelm Keitel. (AP Photo)
In 1939, in a speech to the Reichstag, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler spoke of his plans to reorder the ethnic layout of Europe – a plan which would entail settling the “Jewish problem.” (AP Photo, Oct. 5, 1939) (AP/Anonymous)
President Gerald Ford, right, emphasized a point during his second debate with Jimmy Carter, left, at Palace of  Fine Arts Theater, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1976, San Francisco, Calif. (AP Photo)
In 1976, in his second presidential debate with Democrat Jimmy Carter, President Gerald R. Ford asserted there was “no Soviet domination of eastern Europe.” Ford later conceded that was not the case. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
Pope John Paul II stands on the balcony of the White House with  President Jimmy Carter and first lady Rosalynn Carter in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 6, 1979.  (AP Photo)
In 1979, Pope John Paul II, on a week-long U.S. tour, became the first pontiff to visit the White House, where he was received by President Jimmy Carter. Here, Pope John Paul II stands on the balcony of the White House with President Carter and first lady Rosalynn Carter in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 6, 1979. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Actress Bette Davis is shown in Los Angeles, Ca., on June 21, 1983. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
In 1989, actress Bette Davis died in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, at age 81. Here, Davis is shown in Los Angeles on June 21, 1983. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)   (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
Anwar Sadat
In 1981, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat was shot to death by extremists while reviewing a military parade. FILE – In this Oct. 6, 1981 file photo, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat smiles at the start of the military parade in Cairo. Later, during the parade, Sadat was killed with eleven others when gunmen opened fire on the reviewing stand with automation weapons. Twenty-eight others were wounded including Vice President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Bill Foley, File) (AP/Bill Foley)
The Dallas Stars and Vegas Golden Knights line up for a moment of silence for shooting victims in Las Vegas before an NHL hockey game in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
In 2017, the NHL’s Vegas Golden Knights, the first major pro sports franchise in Las Vegas, played their first regular-season game in Dallas five days after the shooting that left 58 people dead in Las Vegas; the team would go on to reach the Stanley Cup finals in its first season. The Dallas Stars and Vegas Golden Knights line up for a moment of silence for shooting victims in Las Vegas before an NHL hockey game in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/LM Otero) (AP/LM Otero)
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American actor and singer Al Jolson with his wife Ruby after their arrival at Cherbourg Harbour, France, on Aug. 29, 1928. (AP Photo)
Adolf Hitler, front, salutes parading troops of the German Wehrmacht in Warsaw, Poland, on Oct. 5, 1939 after the German invasion. Behind Hitler are seen, from left to right: Army Commander in Chief, Colonel General Walther von Brauchitsch, new commandant of Warsaw, Lieutenant General Friedrich von Cochenhausen, Colonel General Gerd von Rundstedt, Colonel General Wilhelm Keitel. (AP Photo)
President Gerald Ford, right, emphasized a point during his second debate with Jimmy Carter, left, at Palace of  Fine Arts Theater, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1976, San Francisco, Calif. (AP Photo)
Pope John Paul II stands on the balcony of the White House with  President Jimmy Carter and first lady Rosalynn Carter in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 6, 1979.  (AP Photo)
Actress Bette Davis is shown in Los Angeles, Ca., on June 21, 1983. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
Anwar Sadat
The Dallas Stars and Vegas Golden Knights line up for a moment of silence for shooting victims in Las Vegas before an NHL hockey game in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Today is Sunday, Oct. 6, the 279th day of 2019. There are 86 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 6, 1939, in a speech to the Reichstag, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler spoke of his plans to reorder the ethnic layout of Europe _ a plan which would entail settling the “Jewish problem.”

On this date:

In 1536, English theologian and scholar William Tyndale, who was the first to translate the Bible into Early Modern English, was executed for heresy.

In 1892, British poet laureate Alfred, Lord Tennyson died in Surrey, England, at age 83.

In 1927, the era of talking pictures arrived with the opening of “The Jazz Singer” starring Al Jolson, a feature containing both silent and sound-synchronized sequences.

In 1949, President Harry S. Truman signed the Mutual Defense Assistance Act, providing $1.3 billion in military aid to NATO countries.

In 1958, the nuclear submarine USS Seawolf surfaced after spending 60 days submerged.

In 1973, war erupted in the Middle East as Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack on Israel during the Yom Kippur holiday. (Israel, initially caught off guard, managed to push back the Arab forces before a cease-fire finally took hold in the nearly three-week conflict.)

In 1976, President Gerald R. Ford, in his second presidential debate with Democrat Jimmy Carter, asserted that there was “no Soviet domination of eastern Europe.” (Ford later conceded such was not the case.)

In 1979, Pope John Paul II, on a week-long U.S. tour, became the first pontiff to visit the White House, where he was received by President Jimmy Carter.

In 1981, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat was shot to death by extremists while reviewing a military parade.

In 1989, actress Bette Davis died in Neuilly-sur-Seine (nu-yee-sur-sehn), France, at age 81.

In 2003, American Paul Lauterbur and Briton Peter Mansfield won the Nobel Prize for medicine for discoveries that led to magnetic resonance imaging.

In 2004, the top U.S. arms inspector in Iraq, Charles Duelfer (DEHL’-fur), reported finding no evidence Saddam Hussein’s regime had produced weapons of mass destruction after 1991.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama said al-Qaida had “lost operational capacity” in Afghanistan after a series of military setbacks and vowed to continue the battle to cripple the terror organization. George Papandreou was sworn in as Greece’s new Socialist prime minister. Americans Charles K. Kao, Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith won the Nobel Prize in physics.

Five years ago: The Supreme Court unexpectedly cleared the way for a dramatic expansion of gay marriage in the United States as it rejected appeals from five states seeking to preserve their bans, effectively making such marriages legal in 30 states. Husband-and-wife scientists Edvard Moser and May-Britt Moser of Norway and New York-born researcher John O’Keefe were named recipients of the Nobel Prize in medicine for discovering the brain’s GPS-like system. USA Swimming suspended Michael Phelps for six months as a result of the Olympic champion’s second DUI arrest.

One year ago: In the narrowest Senate confirmation of a Supreme Court justice in nearly a century and a half, Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed by a 50-48 vote; he was sworn in hours later. A supersized limousine ran a stop sign and hit a parked SUV in Schoharie, N.Y., killing all 18 people in the vehicle and two bystanders. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker made his national debut in Iowa as a Democratic presidential prospect, telling a party fundraiser that Democrats who were disappointed by Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation should turn their despair into action.

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