Today in History: Sept. 22

On this date in 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21, was hanged as a spy by the British in New York. Here, a statue of Hale is seen at the state Capitol in Hartford, Conn.  Hale was a Connecticut native and Yale University graduate. (AP Photo/Bob Child)
In 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21, was hanged as a spy by the British in New York. Here, a statue of Hale is seen at the state Capitol in Hartford, Conn. Hale was a Connecticut native and Yale University graduate. (AP Photo/Bob Child) (AP/BOB CHILD)
On this date in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of January 1, 1863. (AP Photo)
In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of January 1, 1863. (AP Photo) (AP)
On this date in 1927, Gene Tunney successfully defended his heavyweight boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous "long-count" fight in Chicago. (AP Photo)
In 1927, Gene Tunney successfully defended his heavyweight boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous “long-count” fight in Chicago. (AP Photo) (AP)
On Sept. 22, 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald R. Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed. Moore served 32 years in prison before being paroled on Dec. 31, 2007. (AP Photo/Jim Palmer)
In 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald R. Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed. Moore served 32 years in prison before being paroled on Dec. 31, 2007. (AP Photo/Jim Palmer) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/JIM PALMER)
On this date in 1985, rock and country music artists participated in "Farm Aid," a concert staged in Champaign, Illinois, to help the nation's farmers. Here, John Cougar Mellencamp performs.  (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
In 1985, rock and country music artists participated in “Farm Aid,” a concert staged in Champaign, Illinois, to help the nation’s farmers. Here, John Cougar Mellencamp performs. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman) (AP/Seth Perlman)
FILE - This July 16, 1945 photo, shows the mushroom cloud of the first atomic explosion at Trinity Test Site, New Mexico. The National Cancer Institute says its long-anticipated study into the cancer risks of New Mexico residents living near the site of the world's first atomic bomb test likely will be published in 2019. Institute spokesman Michael Levin told The Associated Press that researchers are examining data on diet and radiation exposure and expect to finish the study by early next year. (AP Photo, File)
On Sept. 22, 1949, the Soviet Union exploded its first atomic bomb. FILE – This July 16, 1945 photo, shows the mushroom cloud of the first atomic explosion at Trinity Test Site, New Mexico. The National Cancer Institute says its long-anticipated study into the cancer risks of New Mexico residents living near the site of the world’s first atomic bomb test likely will be published in 2019. Institute spokesman Michael Levin told The Associated Press that researchers are examining data on diet and radiation exposure and expect to finish the study by early next year. (AP Photo, File) (AP)
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
In 1994, the situation comedy “Friends” debuted on NBC-TV.
Eli Harold, Colin Kaepernick, Eric Reid
In 2017, President Donald Trump said NFL owners should fire players who kneel during the national anthem. FILE – In this Oct. 2, 2016 file photo, from left, San Francisco 49ers outside linebacker Eli Harold, quarterback Colin Kaepernick and safety Eric Reid kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Dallas Cowboys in Santa Clara, Calif. An arbitrator is sending Kaepernick’s grievance with the NFL to trial, denying the league’s request to throw out the quarterback’s claims that owners conspired to keep him out of the league because of his protests of social injustice. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File) (AP/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
FILE - In this Sept. 23, 1959, file photo, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and Roswell Garst pose with corn cobs during an inspection tour of The Garst Farm in Coon Rapids, Iowa. Khrushchev became the first Soviet leader to visit the U.S. He traveled to Washington, New York, California and Iowa and held meetings with President Dwight Eisenhower. (AP Photo/File)
In 1959, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev arrived in Iowa for a two-day stopover, during which he visited a corn farm, held talks with former Illinois Gov. Adlai Stevenson, and ate his first hot dog. FILE – In this Sept. 23, 1959, file photo, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and Roswell Garst pose with corn cobs during an inspection tour of The Garst Farm in Coon Rapids, Iowa. Khrushchev became the first Soviet leader to visit the U.S. He traveled to Washington, New York, California and Iowa and held meetings with President Dwight Eisenhower. (AP Photo/File) (AP/Anonymous)
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On this date in 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21, was hanged as a spy by the British in New York. Here, a statue of Hale is seen at the state Capitol in Hartford, Conn.  Hale was a Connecticut native and Yale University graduate. (AP Photo/Bob Child)
On this date in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of January 1, 1863. (AP Photo)
On this date in 1927, Gene Tunney successfully defended his heavyweight boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous "long-count" fight in Chicago. (AP Photo)
On Sept. 22, 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald R. Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed. Moore served 32 years in prison before being paroled on Dec. 31, 2007. (AP Photo/Jim Palmer)
On this date in 1985, rock and country music artists participated in "Farm Aid," a concert staged in Champaign, Illinois, to help the nation's farmers. Here, John Cougar Mellencamp performs.  (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
FILE - This July 16, 1945 photo, shows the mushroom cloud of the first atomic explosion at Trinity Test Site, New Mexico. The National Cancer Institute says its long-anticipated study into the cancer risks of New Mexico residents living near the site of the world's first atomic bomb test likely will be published in 2019. Institute spokesman Michael Levin told The Associated Press that researchers are examining data on diet and radiation exposure and expect to finish the study by early next year. (AP Photo, File)
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
Eli Harold, Colin Kaepernick, Eric Reid
FILE - In this Sept. 23, 1959, file photo, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and Roswell Garst pose with corn cobs during an inspection tour of The Garst Farm in Coon Rapids, Iowa. Khrushchev became the first Soviet leader to visit the U.S. He traveled to Washington, New York, California and Iowa and held meetings with President Dwight Eisenhower. (AP Photo/File)

Today is Sunday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2019. There are 100 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Sept. 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of January 1, 1863.

On this date:

In 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21, was hanged as a spy by the British in New York.

In 1927, Gene Tunney successfully defended his heavyweight boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous “long-count” fight in Chicago.

In 1949, the Soviet Union exploded its first atomic bomb.

In 1950, Omar N. Bradley was promoted to the rank of five-star general, joining an elite group that included Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall and Henry H. “Hap” Arnold.

In 1961, the Interstate Commerce Commission issued rules prohibiting racial discrimination on interstate buses.

In 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald R. Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed.

In 1980, the Persian Gulf conflict between Iran and Iraq erupted into full-scale war.

In 1985, rock and country music artists participated in “FarmAid,” a concert staged in Champaign, Illinois, to help the nation’s farmers.

In 1989, the Irish Republican Army bombed the Royal Marines School of Music in Deal, Kent, England, killing 11 band members. Songwriter Irving Berlin died in New York City at age 101.

In 1993, 47 people were killed when an Amtrak passenger train fell off a bridge and crashed into Big Bayou Canot near Mobile, Alabama. (A tugboat pilot lost in fog pushed a barge into the railroad bridge, knocking the tracks 38 inches out of line just minutes before the train arrived.)

In 1994, the situation comedy “Friends” debuted on NBC-TV.

In 1995, an AWACS plane carrying U.S. and Canadian military personnel crashed on takeoff from Elmendorf Air Force Base near Anchorage, Alaska, killing all 24 people aboard.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama, visiting New York, brought together Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas for their first face-to-face meeting. Al-Qaida released a 106-minute-long video predicting President Obama’s downfall at the hands of the Muslim world.

Five years ago: The United States and five Arab nations launched airstrikes against the Islamic State group in Syria, sending waves of planes and Tomahawk cruise missiles against an array of targets.

One year ago: Negotiations between the Senate Judiciary Committee and Christine Blasey Ford on the conditions for her possible testimony continued, with committee chairman Chuck Grassley saying the panel would go ahead and vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh if no agreement could be worked out for Ford to testify about what she said was a sexual assault by Kavanaugh. Paul Simon ended what was billed as his final concert tour in a park in Queens, New York, telling the hometown crowd that their cheers “mean more than you can know.”

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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