Today in History: Aug. 14

President Franklin Roosevelt signs the Social Security Bill in Washington on August 14, 1935.  The bill will provide old age pensions and unemployment insurance.  From left are: Chairman Doughton of the House Ways and Means Committree; Sen. Wagner, D-N.Y, co-author of the bill, Secretary Perkins, Chairman Harrison of the Senate Finance Committe, Rep. Lewis, D-Md., co-author of the measure. (AP Photo)
In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law. In this photo, President Franklin Roosevelt signs the Social Security Bill in Washington. The bill will provide old age pensions and unemployment insurance. From left are: Chairman Doughton of the House Ways and Means Committree; Sen. Wagner, D-N.Y, co-author of the bill, Secretary Perkins, Chairman Harrison of the Senate Finance Committe, Rep. Lewis, D-Md., co-author of the measure. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 14, 1945 picture, U.S. President Harry S. Truman stands at his desk during a news conference in the White House in Washington announcing the Japanese surrender, officially signaling the war's end.  World War II veterans, their families and officials marked the 65th anniversary of the end of that war on board the same ship where Japan formally surrendered in 1945.  (AP Photo/File)
In 1945, President Harry S. Truman announced that Imperial Japan had surrendered unconditionally, ending World War II. In this Tuesday, Aug. 14, 1945 file photo, U.S. President Harry S. Truman stands at his desk during a news conference in the White House in Washington announcing the Japanese surrender, officially signaling the war’s end. (AP Photo/File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
In 1969, British troops went to Northern Ireland to intervene in sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics. (AP Photo).
In 1969, British troops went to Northern Ireland to intervene in sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics. (AP Photo). (ASSOCIATED PRESS/STR)
On this date in 1973, U.S. bombing of Cambodia came to a halt. Here, Cambodian villagers walk around bomb crater in road near embattled Takeo 42 miles southwest of Phnom Penh in Cambodia  May 17, 1973.  (AP Photo/Chhor Yuthy)
In 1973, U.S. bombing of Cambodia came to a halt. Here, Cambodian villagers walk around bomb crater in road near embattled Takeo 42 miles southwest of Phnom Penh in Cambodia May 17, 1973. (AP Photo/Chhor Yuthy) (AP/Chhor Yuthy)
Middow Ibram Daayoue, 40, sits in an Irish Concern feeding center dedicated to adults, Tuesday, Dec. 16, 1992 in Baidoa. The adult sector of Somalia’s population in struggling quietly to survive as most of the attention is focused on Somalia’s starving young. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In 1992, the White House announced that the Pentagon would begin emergency airlifts of food to Somalia to alleviate mass deaths by starvation. Middow Ibram Daayoue, 40, sits in an Irish Concern feeding center dedicated to adults, Tuesday, Dec. 16, 1992 in Baidoa. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Jerome Delay)
In 1997, an unrepentant Timothy McVeigh was formally sentenced to death for the Oklahoma City bombing.(AP Photo/David Longstreath, File)
In 1997, an unrepentant Timothy McVeigh was formally sentenced to death for the Oklahoma City bombing. (AP Photo/David Longstreath, File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/DAVID LONGSTREATH)
FILE - This Nov. 10, 1965, file photo, shows a combo wirephoto that was transmitted by The Associated Press to show the Manhattan skyline, photographed from the Queens borough of New York, in darkness on Nov. 9, 1965, top, during the great blackout and again shortly after the power came back on at 3:35 a.m., the next morning. The nation had never seen a power failure of such scope before, and in New York, the nation's communications capital, news organizations including The AP were stymied in finding out what happened and in getting the word out to the public. It was soon established that problems with the electrical grid caused the blackout, the first large-scale realization of infrastructure worries that would resurface in major blackouts in 1977 and again in 2003. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File)
In 2003, a huge blackout hit the northeastern United States and part of Canada; 50 million people lost power. FILE – This Nov. 10, 1965, file photo, shows a combo wirephoto that was transmitted by The Associated Press to show the Manhattan skyline, photographed from the Queens borough of New York, in darkness on Nov. 9, 1965, top, during the great blackout and again shortly after the power came back on at 3:35 a.m., the next morning. The nation had never seen a power failure of such scope before, and in New York, the nation’s communications capital, news organizations including The AP were stymied in finding out what happened and in getting the word out to the public. It was soon established that problems with the electrical grid caused the blackout, the first large-scale realization of infrastructure worries that would resurface in major blackouts in 1977 and again in 2003. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File) (AP)
(1/7)
President Franklin Roosevelt signs the Social Security Bill in Washington on August 14, 1935.  The bill will provide old age pensions and unemployment insurance.  From left are: Chairman Doughton of the House Ways and Means Committree; Sen. Wagner, D-N.Y, co-author of the bill, Secretary Perkins, Chairman Harrison of the Senate Finance Committe, Rep. Lewis, D-Md., co-author of the measure. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 14, 1945 picture, U.S. President Harry S. Truman stands at his desk during a news conference in the White House in Washington announcing the Japanese surrender, officially signaling the war's end.  World War II veterans, their families and officials marked the 65th anniversary of the end of that war on board the same ship where Japan formally surrendered in 1945.  (AP Photo/File)
In 1969, British troops went to Northern Ireland to intervene in sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics. (AP Photo).
On this date in 1973, U.S. bombing of Cambodia came to a halt. Here, Cambodian villagers walk around bomb crater in road near embattled Takeo 42 miles southwest of Phnom Penh in Cambodia  May 17, 1973.  (AP Photo/Chhor Yuthy)
Middow Ibram Daayoue, 40, sits in an Irish Concern feeding center dedicated to adults, Tuesday, Dec. 16, 1992 in Baidoa. The adult sector of Somalia’s population in struggling quietly to survive as most of the attention is focused on Somalia’s starving young. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In 1997, an unrepentant Timothy McVeigh was formally sentenced to death for the Oklahoma City bombing.(AP Photo/David Longstreath, File)
FILE - This Nov. 10, 1965, file photo, shows a combo wirephoto that was transmitted by The Associated Press to show the Manhattan skyline, photographed from the Queens borough of New York, in darkness on Nov. 9, 1965, top, during the great blackout and again shortly after the power came back on at 3:35 a.m., the next morning. The nation had never seen a power failure of such scope before, and in New York, the nation's communications capital, news organizations including The AP were stymied in finding out what happened and in getting the word out to the public. It was soon established that problems with the electrical grid caused the blackout, the first large-scale realization of infrastructure worries that would resurface in major blackouts in 1977 and again in 2003. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File)

Today is Wednesday, Aug. 14, the 226th day of 2019. There are 139 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On August 14, 1945, President Harry S. Truman announced that Imperial Japan had surrendered unconditionally, ending World War II.

On this date:

In 1900, international forces, including U.S. Marines, entered Beijing to put down the Boxer Rebellion, which was aimed at purging China of foreign influence.

In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law.

In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill issued the Atlantic Charter, a statement of principles that renounced aggression.

In 1948, the Summer Olympics in London ended; they were the first Olympic games held since 1936.

In 1969, British troops went to Northern Ireland to intervene in sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics.

In 1973, U.S. bombing of Cambodia came to a halt.

In 1980, actress-model Dorothy Stratten, 20, was shot to death by her estranged husband and manager, Paul Snider, who then killed himself.

In 1992, the White House announced that the Pentagon would begin emergency airlifts of food to Somalia to alleviate mass deaths by starvation.

In 1997, an unrepentant Timothy McVeigh was formally sentenced to death for the Oklahoma City bombing.

In 2003, a huge blackout hit the northeastern United States and part of Canada; 50 million people lost power.

In 2008, President George W. Bush signed consumer-safety legislation that banned lead from children’s toys, imposing the toughest standard in the world.

In 2017, under pressure from right and left, President Donald Trump condemned white supremacist groups by name, declaring them to be “repugnant to everything that we hold dear as Americans.” The CEO of Merck, the nation’s third-largest pharmaceutical company, resigned from a federal advisory council, citing Trump’s failure to explicitly condemn white nationalists who marched in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Kenneth Frazier was one of the few African Americans to head a Fortune 500 company. The CEOs of Intel and Under Armour also resigned from the American Manufacturing Council later in the day.)

Ten years ago: Kicking off a four-state push for his health care overhaul plan, President Barack Obama denounced what he suggested was news media overemphasis on scenes of angry protesters at town-hall meetings, telling his own gathering in Belgrade, Montana, that “TV loves a ruckus.” Charles Manson follower Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, 60, convicted of trying to assassinate President Gerald Ford in 1975, was released from a Texas prison hospital after more than three decades behind bars.

Five years ago: Nouri al-Malaki, Iraq’s prime minister for eight years, relinquished the post to his nominated successor, ending a political deadlock. Pope Francis called for renewed efforts to forge peace on the war-divided Korean Peninsula as he opened a five-day visit to South Korea. Rob Manfred was elected baseball’s 10th commissioner, winning a three-man race to succeed Bud Selig. San Francisco said goodbye to Candlestick Park — the stadium where the city’s beloved Giants and 49ers celebrated some of their greatest triumphs — with an evening concert by former Beatle Paul McCartney.

One year ago: A highway bridge collapsed in the Italian city of Genoa during a storm, sending vehicles plunging nearly 150 feet and leaving 43 people dead. Vermont Democrats chose the nation’s first transgender gubernatorial nominee, Christine Hallquist. (Hallquist would get 40% of the vote in November against Republican Phil Scott, who won with 55%.) A state grand jury report concluded that some 300 Roman Catholic priests in Pennsylvania had molested more than 1,000 children since the 1940s and that church officials had covered up complaints. Puerto Rico officials announced that power was restored to the entire island for the first time since Hurricane Maria nearly 11 months earlier. Los Angeles transit officials said the city’s subway system would become the first in the country to install body scanners to screen passengers for weapons and explosives.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up