Today in History: Dec. 6

The capstone of the Washington Monument is set by workmen, 1884.  (AP Photo)
In 1884, Army engineers completed construction of the Washington Monument by setting an aluminum capstone atop the obelisk. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Close-up of different sized piles of rocks
In 1907, the worst mining disaster in U.S. history occurred as 362 men and boys died in a coal mine explosion in Monongah, West Virginia. (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/moodboard RF/moodboard)
Florida Gov. Millard Caldwell welcomes U.S. President. Harry S. Truman to Everglades City,  Fla. Dec 6,  1947 for the formal dedication of the Everglades National Park.(AP Photo)
In 1947, Everglades National Park in Florida was dedicated by President Harry S. Truman. Florida Gov. Millard Caldwell welcomes U.S. President. Harry S. Truman to Everglades City, Fla. Dec 6, 1947 for the formal dedication of the Everglades National Park. (AP Photo) (AP/Anonymous)
A sign on a bridge leading to the US Embassy compound ahead the official opening in Jerusalem, Sunday, May 13, 2018. Monday's opening of the U.S. Embassy in contested Jerusalem, cheered by Israelis as a historic validation, is seen by Palestinians as an in-your-face affirmation of pro-Israel bias by President Donald Trump and a new blow to frail statehood dreams. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In 2017, President Donald Trump declared Jerusalem to be Israel’s capital, defying warnings from the Palestinians and others around the world that he would be destroying hopes for Mideast peace. A sign on a bridge leading to the US Embassy compound ahead the official opening in Jerusalem, Sunday, May 13, 2018. Monday’s opening of the U.S. Embassy in contested Jerusalem, cheered by Israelis as a historic validation, is seen by Palestinians as an in-your-face affirmation of pro-Israel bias by President Donald Trump and a new blow to frail statehood dreams. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit) (AP/Ariel Schalit)
**FOR USE AS DESIRED WITH YEAR END - FILE** In this undated file photo, Martha "Sonny" Von Bulow is shown. After surviving 28 years in a persistent vegetative state, Von Bulow died in a New York City nursing home, Saturday, Dec. 6, 2008. She was 76. (AP Photo)
In 2008, heiress Martha “Sunny” von Bulow, who’d spent the last 28 years of her life in a coma, died in New York City at age 76. **FOR USE AS DESIRED WITH YEAR END – FILE** In this undated file photo, Martha “Sonny” Von Bulow is shown. After surviving 28 years in a persistent vegetative state, Von Bulow died in a New York City nursing home, Saturday, Dec. 6, 2008. She was 76. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Anonymous)
Hugo Chavez
In 1998, in Venezuela, former Lt. Col. Hugo Chavez, who had staged a bloody coup attempt against the government six years earlier, was elected president. FILE – In this Sept. 20, 2006 file photo, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez holds a Spanish language version of Hegemony or Survival: America’s Quest for Global Dominance by Noam Chomsky while addressing the 61st session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters. The late Venezuelan leader drew gasps at the U.N. in 2006 when he said of U.S. President George W. Bush, “Yesterday, the devil came here,” adding that the podium “still smells of sulfur.” The U.S. was at the time heavily embroiled in the Iraq War, which Chavez had vehemently opposed. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File) (AP/Julie Jacobson)
Vice President Gerald Ford gets a wave from his wife Betty early Friday as he left their home in Alexandria on Dec. 7, 1973.  It will be his first full day in his new position following formal swearing in ceremonies on Thursday evening in the House of Representatives chamber. (AP Photo)
In 1973, House minority leader Gerald R. Ford was sworn in as vice president, succeeding Spiro T. Agnew. Vice President Gerald Ford gets a wave from his wife Betty early Friday as he left their home in Alexandria on Dec. 7, 1973. It will be his first full day in his new position following formal swearing in ceremonies on Thursday evening in the House of Representatives chamber. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Bob Daugherty)
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The capstone of the Washington Monument is set by workmen, 1884.  (AP Photo)
Close-up of different sized piles of rocks
Florida Gov. Millard Caldwell welcomes U.S. President. Harry S. Truman to Everglades City,  Fla. Dec 6,  1947 for the formal dedication of the Everglades National Park.(AP Photo)
A sign on a bridge leading to the US Embassy compound ahead the official opening in Jerusalem, Sunday, May 13, 2018. Monday's opening of the U.S. Embassy in contested Jerusalem, cheered by Israelis as a historic validation, is seen by Palestinians as an in-your-face affirmation of pro-Israel bias by President Donald Trump and a new blow to frail statehood dreams. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
**FOR USE AS DESIRED WITH YEAR END - FILE** In this undated file photo, Martha "Sonny" Von Bulow is shown. After surviving 28 years in a persistent vegetative state, Von Bulow died in a New York City nursing home, Saturday, Dec. 6, 2008. She was 76. (AP Photo)
Hugo Chavez
Vice President Gerald Ford gets a wave from his wife Betty early Friday as he left their home in Alexandria on Dec. 7, 1973.  It will be his first full day in his new position following formal swearing in ceremonies on Thursday evening in the House of Representatives chamber. (AP Photo)

Today is Thursday, Dec. 6, the 340th day of 2018.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On Dec. 6, 1907, the worst mining disaster in U.S. history occurred as 362 men and boys died in a coal mine explosion in Monongah, West Virginia.

On this date:

In 1790, Congress moved to Philadelphia from New York.

In 1865, the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, abolishing slavery, was ratified as Georgia became the 27th state to endorse it.

In 1884, Army engineers completed construction of the Washington Monument by setting an aluminum capstone atop the obelisk.

In 1917, some 2,000 people were killed when an explosives-laden French cargo ship, the Mont Blanc, collided with the Norwegian vessel Imo at the harbor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, setting off a blast that devastated the Canadian city. Finland declared its independence from Russia.

In 1923, a presidential address was broadcast on radio for the first time as President Coolidge spoke to a joint session of Congress.

In 1947, Everglades National Park in Florida was dedicated by President Harry S. Truman.

In 1957, America’s first attempt at putting a satellite into orbit failed as Vanguard TV3 rose about four feet off a Cape Canaveral launch pad before crashing down and exploding.

In 1973, House minority leader Gerald R. Ford was sworn in as vice president, succeeding Spiro T. Agnew.

In 1982, 11 soldiers and six civilians were killed when an Irish National Liberation Army bomb exploded at a pub in Ballykelly, Northern Ireland.

In 1989, 14 women were shot to death at the University of Montreal’s school of engineering by a man who then took his own life.

In 1998, in Venezuela, former Lt. Col. Hugo Chavez (OO’-goh CHAH’-vez), who had staged a bloody coup attempt against the government six years earlier, was elected president.

In 2001, The House of Representatives, by a one-vote margin, gave President George W. Bush more power to negotiate global trade deals. President Bush dedicated the national Christmas tree to those who had died on Sept. 11 and to service members who had died in the line of duty.

Ten years ago: President-elect Barack Obama said in a Saturday radio and Internet address that he’d asked his economic team for a recovery plan that would save or create more than 2 million jobs. Indicted Democratic U.S. Rep. William Jefferson was ousted from his New Orleans area district in a special election won by Republican attorney Anh “Joseph” Cao, who became the first Vietnamese-American in Congress. Heiress Martha “Sunny” von Bulow, who’d spent the last 28 years of her life in a coma, died in New York City at age 76.

Five years ago: A day after Nelson Mandela’s death at 95, South Africans of all colors erupted in song, dance and tears in emotional celebrations of the life of the man who had bridged the country’s black-white divide and helped avert a race war. The Fender Stratocaster that Bob Dylan played at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival was sold at Christie’s for nearly $1 million _ the highest price ever paid for a guitar at auction.

One year ago: President Donald Trump declared Jerusalem to be Israel’s capital, defying warnings from the Palestinians and others around the world that he would be destroying hopes for Mideast peace. Time magazine named as its Person of the Year the “Silence Breakers” – those who had shared their stories about sexual assault and harassment. A wildfire erupted in the exclusive Bel-Air section of Los Angeles, the latest neighborhood of Southern California to find itself under siege from an outbreak of wind-driven blazes. Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that he would seek re-election, putting him on track to become Russia’s longest-serving ruler since Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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