Today in History: Dec. 15

Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. shown under construction Aug. 24, 1939. Tidal Basin is shown in the background. (AP Photo)
In 1938, groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial took place in Washington, D.C., with President Franklin D. Roosevelt taking part in the ceremony. The memorial is shown under construction Aug. 24, 1939. Tidal Basin is seen in the background. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Portrait of Glenn Miller, the famous band leader, March 10, 1940. (AP Photo)
In 1944, a single-engine plane carrying bandleader Glenn Miller, a major in the U.S. Army Air Forces, disappeared over the English Channel while en route to Paris. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
A euro logo is seen in front of the headquarters of the European Central bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, Germany, Sept. 14, 2000. Just months before 300 million Europeans trade in their worn and torn national currencies for shiny new euro coins and crisp new bills, worries are mounting over how smoothly the historic money swap will go. (AP Photo/Frank Rumpenhorst)
In 1995, European Union leaders meeting in Madrid, Spain, chose “euro” as the name of the new single European currency. (AP Photo/Frank Rumpenhorst) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/FRANK RUMPENHORST)
FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2001 file photo, workers and heavy machinery continue the cleanup and recovery effort in front of the remaining facade of 1 World Trade Center at ground zero in New York.The remains of a man killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11 have been identified for the first time nearly 16 years after the terror attacks, the New York City medical examiners' office announced Monday Aug.7, 2017. Medical examiners use DNA testing and other means to try to match bone fragments to the 2,753 people killed by the hijackers who crashed airplanes into the trade center's twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001. Remains of 1,641 victims have been identified so far.(AP Photo/Stephen Chernin, File)
In 2001, with a crash and a large dust cloud, a 50-foot tall section of steel _ the last standing piece of the World Trade Center’s facade _ was brought down in New York. FILE – In this Nov. 7, 2001 file photo, workers and heavy machinery continue the cleanup and recovery effort in front of the remaining facade of 1 World Trade Center at ground zero in New York.The remains of a man killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11 have been identified for the first time nearly 16 years after the terror attacks, the New York City medical examiners’ office announced Monday Aug.7, 2017. Medical examiners use DNA testing and other means to try to match bone fragments to the 2,753 people killed by the hijackers who crashed airplanes into the trade center’s twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001. Remains of 1,641 victims have been identified so far.(AP Photo/Stephen Chernin, File) (AP/STEPHEN CHERNIN)
Nelson Mandela
In 2013, Nelson Mandela was laid to rest in his childhood hometown, ending a 10-day mourning period for South Africa’s first black president. FILE – In this file photo dated Wednesday, March 28, 2007, Former South African President Nelson Mandela is photographed at the Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg. The United Nations is seeking to harness the soaring symbolism of Nelson Mandela’s struggle and national reconciliation, as it unveils of a statue of Mandela, born 100 years ago, at the U.N. building in New York on Monday Sept. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File) (AP/Jerome Delay)
This is a copy of the cover of the U.S. Constitution.
On Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution, went into effect following ratification by Virginia. (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/giftlegacy)
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Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. shown under construction Aug. 24, 1939. Tidal Basin is shown in the background. (AP Photo)
Portrait of Glenn Miller, the famous band leader, March 10, 1940. (AP Photo)
A euro logo is seen in front of the headquarters of the European Central bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, Germany, Sept. 14, 2000. Just months before 300 million Europeans trade in their worn and torn national currencies for shiny new euro coins and crisp new bills, worries are mounting over how smoothly the historic money swap will go. (AP Photo/Frank Rumpenhorst)
FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2001 file photo, workers and heavy machinery continue the cleanup and recovery effort in front of the remaining facade of 1 World Trade Center at ground zero in New York.The remains of a man killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11 have been identified for the first time nearly 16 years after the terror attacks, the New York City medical examiners' office announced Monday Aug.7, 2017. Medical examiners use DNA testing and other means to try to match bone fragments to the 2,753 people killed by the hijackers who crashed airplanes into the trade center's twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001. Remains of 1,641 victims have been identified so far.(AP Photo/Stephen Chernin, File)
Nelson Mandela
This is a copy of the cover of the U.S. Constitution.

Today is Saturday, Dec. 15, the 349th day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution, went into effect following ratification by Virginia.

On this date:

In 1890, Sioux Indian Chief Sitting Bull and 11 other tribe members were killed in Grand River, South Dakota, during a confrontation with Indian police.

In 1938, groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial took place in Washington, D.C. with President Franklin D. Roosevelt taking part in the ceremony.

In 1944, a single-engine plane carrying bandleader Glenn Miller, a major in the U.S. Army Air Forces, disappeared over the English Channel while en route to Paris.

In 1960, Teflon-coated skillets first went on sale, at Macy’s flagship store in New York City.

In 1961, former Nazi official Adolf Eichmann was sentenced to death by an Israeli court for crimes against humanity. (Eichmann was hanged 5 1/2 months later.)

In 1965, two U.S. manned spacecraft, Gemini 6A and Gemini 7, maneuvered toward each other while in orbit, at one point coming as close as one foot.

In 1967, the Silver Bridge between Gallipolis (gal-ih-puh-LEES’), Ohio, and Point Pleasant, West Virginia, collapsed into the Ohio River, killing 46 people.

In 1978, President Jimmy Carter announced he would grant diplomatic recognition to Communist China on New Year’s Day and sever official relations with Taiwan.

In 1989, a popular uprising began in Romania that resulted in the downfall of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu (chow-SHES’-koo).

In 1995, European Union leaders meeting in Madrid, Spain, chose “euro” as the name of the new single European currency.

In 2000, the long-troubled Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was closed for good.

In 2001, with a crash and a large dust cloud, a 50-foot tall section of steel _ the last standing piece of the World Trade Center’s facade _ was brought down in New York.

Ten years ago: President-elect Barack Obama said a review by his own lawyer showed he’d had no direct contact with Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich (blah-GOY’-uh-vich) about the appointment of a Senate replacement, and that transition aides “did nothing inappropriate.” Illinois lawmakers took the first steps toward removing Blagojevich, a Democrat, from office.

Five years ago: Nelson Mandela was laid to rest in his childhood hometown, ending a 10-day mourning period for South Africa’s first black president. Michelle Bachelet easily won Chile’s presidential runoff. Academy Award-winning actress Joan Fontaine, 96, died in Carmel, California. Harold Camping, 92, a California preacher who’d used his radio ministry and thousands of billboards to broadcast the end of the world and then gave up when his date-specific doomsdays did not come to pass, died in Oakland, California.

One year ago: Republicans revealed the details of their huge national tax rewrite; the 35 percent tax rate on corporations would fall to 21 percent, and the measure would repeal the requirement under President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act that all Americans have health insurance or face a penalty. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said the middle class would “get skewered” under the GOP tax measure, while the wealthy and corporations would “make out like bandits.” A huge wildfire in coastal mountains northwest of Los Angeles continued to surge west, endangering thousands of homes; the fire was the fourth-largest in the state’s history.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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