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Today in History: Aug. 7

A look at things that have happened on Aug. 7.

Today is Tuesday, Aug. 7, the 219th day of 2018. There are 146 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On August 7, 1964, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin resolution, giving President Lyndon B. Johnson broad powers in dealing with reported North Vietnamese attacks on U.S. forces.

On this date:

In 1782, Gen. George Washington created the Order of the Purple Heart, a decoration to recognize merit in enlisted men and noncommissioned officers.

In 1789, the U.S. Department of War was established by Congress.

In 1882, the famous feud between the Hatfields of West Virginia and the McCoys of Kentucky erupted into full-scale violence.

In 1942, U.S. and other allied forces landed at Guadalcanal, marking the start of the first major allied offensive in the Pacific during World War II. (Japanese forces abandoned the island the following February.)

In 1959, the United States launched the Explorer 6 satellite, which sent back images of Earth.

In 1989, a plane carrying U.S. Rep. Mickey Leland, D-Texas, and 14 others disappeared over Ethiopia. (The wreckage of the plane was found six days later; there were no survivors.)

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush ordered U.S. troops and warplanes to Saudi Arabia to guard the oil-rich desert kingdom against a possible invasion by Iraq.

In 1998, terrorist bombs at U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania killed 224 people, including 12 Americans.

In 2000, Vice President and Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore selected Connecticut Sen. Joseph Lieberman as his running mate; Lieberman became the first Jew on a major party’s presidential ticket.

In 2007, San Francisco’s Barry Bonds hit home run No. 756 to break Hank Aaron’s storied record with one out in the fifth inning of a game against the Washington Nationals, who won, 8-6.

In 2010, Elena Kagan was sworn in as the 112th justice and fourth woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush, speaking in Bangkok, Thailand, praised the spread of freedom in Asia while sharply criticizing oppression and human rights abuses in China, Myanmar and North Korea; the president then traveled to Beijing to attend the opening of the Olympic games.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama’s five-year effort to reboot U.S.-Russian relations crashed as the White House abruptly canceled his planned face-to-face summit with Russia’s Vladimir Putin. The Major League Baseball Players Association formally appealed Alex Rodriguez’s drug probe suspension, sending the case to an independent arbitrator. (The suspension was withheld.)

One year ago: Chicago filed a lawsuit challenging the Trump administration’s policy of withholding public safety grants from sanctuary cities, which chose to limit cooperation with government enforcement of immigration laws. (A federal appeals court later ruled that the federal government cannot set new conditions to awarding those grants.) Medical examiners said the remains of a man who’d been killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11 had been identified, nearly 16 years after the attacks. An indictment against Damaso Lopez Nunez, a leader of Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel, was unsealed by federal prosecutors in Virginia on the same day his son pleaded not guilty to drug charges in federal court in San Diego. (Lopez, who had been in custody in Mexico, was later extradited to the United States, where he was considered a potential key witness against Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.)

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