Today in History: Aug. 15

FILE - In this April 16, 2005 file photo, tables and chairs line the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican in preparation for the conclave. The Vatican Museums, famed for Michelangelo’s ceiling in the Sistine Chapel and masterpieces by Raffaello, are offering an early-bird special, and have posted on their website a new guided itinerary that starts at 6 a.m. and finishes with a light breakfast of croissants, juice and coffee. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File)
In 1483, the Sistine Chapel was consecrated by Pope Sixtus IV. FILE – In this April 16, 2005 file photo, tables and chairs line the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican in preparation for the conclave. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File) (AP/Pier Paolo Cito)
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows before the main altar decorated with huge bank of chrysanthemums as he offers prayers for the war dead during a memorial service at Nippon Budokan martial arts hall in Tokyo, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. Japan marked Saturday the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
In 1945, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito announced in a recorded radio address that his country had accepted terms of surrender for ending World War II. In this photo, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows before the main altar decorated with huge bank of chrysanthemums as he offers prayers for the war dead during a memorial service at Nippon Budokan martial arts hall in Tokyo, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
A shopkeeper displays Indian flags at the entrance of his shop in Jammu, India, Saturday, Aug.13, 2016. Shops across the country are laden with flags and other festive paraphernalia as India prepares to celebrate its Independence Day on Aug. 15. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
In 1947, India became independent after some 200 years of British rule. In this photo, a shopkeeper displays Indian flags at the entrance of his shop in Jammu, India, Saturday, Aug.13, 2016. Shops across the country are laden with flags and other festive paraphernalia as India prepares to celebrate its Independence Day on Aug. 15. (AP Photo/Channi Anand) (AP/Channi Anand)
Peter Leibing, German press photographer in Hamburg, Germany, poses on April 15, 1962 with a copy of his dramatic shot of a communist East German army soldier clearing barbed wire at the Berlin sector border. Leibing made this picture when assigned to Berlin during dramatic August 1961 days, when the Reds set up the wall. The picture won him several prizes among them first prize of America's NPPA (National Press Photographers Association) as was announced on April 14, 1962. (AP Photo/Helmuth Lohmann)
In 1961, as workers began constructing a Berlin Wall made of concrete, East German soldier Conrad Schumann leapt to freedom over a tangle of barbed wire in a scene captured in a famous photograph. Peter Leibing, German press photographer in Hamburg, Germany, poses on April 15, 1962 with a copy of his dramatic shot of a communist East German army soldier clearing barbed wire at the Berlin sector border. Leibing made this picture when assigned to Berlin during dramatic August 1961 days, when the Reds set up the wall. The picture won him several prizes among them first prize of America’s NPPA (National Press Photographers Association) as was announced on April 14, 1962. (AP Photo/Helmuth Lohmann) (AP/Helmuth Lohmann)
August 1969: A group of friends sitting by their car at the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair, one of them is giving a peace sign. (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images)
In 1969, the Woodstock Festival in Bethel, New York opened. During the sometimes rainy weekend, 32 acts performed outdoors before an audience of 400,000 young people. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
President Richard Nixon addresses a Joint Session of Congress, Sept. 9, 1971, to explain his new economic policy following his sudden freeze on prices, rents and wages of Aug. 15. Seated behind him on the dais are Vice President Spiro Agnew, acting as president of the Senate, and Speaker of the House Carl Albert. (AP Photo)
On August 15, 1971, President Richard Nixon announced a 90-day freeze on wages, prices and rents. President Richard Nixon addresses a Joint Session of Congress, Sept. 9, 1971, to explain his new economic policy following his sudden freeze on prices, rents and wages of Aug. 15. Seated behind him on the dais are Vice President Spiro Agnew, acting as president of the Senate, and Speaker of the House Carl Albert. (AP Photo) (AP)
RUC officers look at the debris Sunday, August 16, 1998, following yesterday's bomb in Omagh town centre. The bomb exploded Saturday afternoon killing 28 people and injuring a further 220. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant).
In 1998, 29 people were killed by a car bomb that tore apart the center of Omagh, Northern Ireland; a splinter group calling itself the Real IRA claimed responsibility. RUC officers look at the debris Sunday, August 16, 1998, following the previous day’s bomb in Omagh town centre. The bomb exploded Saturday afternoon killing 28 people and injuring a further 220. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant). (AP/ALASTAIR GRANT)
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FILE - In this April 16, 2005 file photo, tables and chairs line the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican in preparation for the conclave. The Vatican Museums, famed for Michelangelo’s ceiling in the Sistine Chapel and masterpieces by Raffaello, are offering an early-bird special, and have posted on their website a new guided itinerary that starts at 6 a.m. and finishes with a light breakfast of croissants, juice and coffee. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File)
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows before the main altar decorated with huge bank of chrysanthemums as he offers prayers for the war dead during a memorial service at Nippon Budokan martial arts hall in Tokyo, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. Japan marked Saturday the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
A shopkeeper displays Indian flags at the entrance of his shop in Jammu, India, Saturday, Aug.13, 2016. Shops across the country are laden with flags and other festive paraphernalia as India prepares to celebrate its Independence Day on Aug. 15. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
Peter Leibing, German press photographer in Hamburg, Germany, poses on April 15, 1962 with a copy of his dramatic shot of a communist East German army soldier clearing barbed wire at the Berlin sector border. Leibing made this picture when assigned to Berlin during dramatic August 1961 days, when the Reds set up the wall. The picture won him several prizes among them first prize of America's NPPA (National Press Photographers Association) as was announced on April 14, 1962. (AP Photo/Helmuth Lohmann)
August 1969: A group of friends sitting by their car at the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair, one of them is giving a peace sign. (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images)
President Richard Nixon addresses a Joint Session of Congress, Sept. 9, 1971, to explain his new economic policy following his sudden freeze on prices, rents and wages of Aug. 15. Seated behind him on the dais are Vice President Spiro Agnew, acting as president of the Senate, and Speaker of the House Carl Albert. (AP Photo)
RUC officers look at the debris Sunday, August 16, 1998, following yesterday's bomb in Omagh town centre. The bomb exploded Saturday afternoon killing 28 people and injuring a further 220. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant).

Today is Thursday, Aug. 15, the 227th day of 2019. There are 138 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On August 15, 1971, President Richard Nixon announced a 90-day freeze on wages, prices and rents.

On this date:

In 1483, the Sistine Chapel was consecrated by Pope Sixtus IV.

In 1888, T.E. Lawrence, the British soldier who gained fame as “Lawrence of Arabia,” was born in Tremadoc, Wales.

In 1935, humorist Will Rogers and aviator Wiley Post were killed when their airplane crashed near Point Barrow in the Alaska Territory.

In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces landed in southern France in Operation Dragoon.

In 1945, in a pre-recorded radio address, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito announced that his country had accepted terms of surrender for ending World War II.

In 1947, India became independent after some 200 years of British rule.

In 1961, as workers began constructing a Berlin Wall made of concrete, East German soldier Conrad Schumann leapt to freedom over a tangle of barbed wire in a scene captured in a famous photograph.

In 1965, the Beatles played to a crowd of more than 55,000 at New York’s Shea Stadium.

In 1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair opened in upstate New York.

In 1995, the Justice Department agreed to pay $3.1 million to white separatist Randy Weaver and his family to settle their claims over the killing of Weaver’s wife and son during a 1992 siege by federal agents at Ruby Ridge, Idaho.

In 1998, 29 people were killed by a car bomb that tore apart the center of Omagh, Northern Ireland; a splinter group calling itself the Real IRA claimed responsibility.

In 2017, President Donald Trump, who’d faced harsh criticism for initially blaming the deadly weekend violence in Charlottesville, Virginia on “many sides,” told reporters that there were “very fine people on both sides” of the confrontation and that groups protesting against the white supremacists were “also very violent.” (In between those statements, at the urging of aides, Trump had offered a more direct condemnation of white supremacists.)

Ten years ago: U.S. Sen. Jim Webb, D-Va., visiting Myanmar, was able to secure the release of John Yettaw, an American imprisoned for swimming to the home of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. A wedding tent fire in Kuwait claimed the lives of 55 women and children.

Five years ago: Texas Gov. Rick Perry was indicted by a grand jury for allegedly abusing the powers of his office by carrying out a threat to veto funding for state prosecutors investigating public corruption. (A coercion charge was tossed on appeal before Texas’ highest criminal court voided the abuse of power charge in February 2016.)

One year ago: President Donald Trump revoked the security clearance of ex-CIA Director John Brennan in an unprecedented act of retribution against a vocal critic; Trump later told The Wall Street Journal that Brennan was among those he held responsible for the Russia investigation. In a speech blasting Trump and his “Make America Great Again” slogan, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said America “was never that great,” and wouldn’t be great until all Americans share true equality. (Cuomo would later say that his words had been “inartful,” and that “America has always been great.”) A suicide bomber struck a private education center in a Shiite neighborhood of the Afghan capital, killing 34 young men and women; the Islamic State group claimed responsibility.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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