Today in History: Dec. 7

In this image provided by the U.S. Navy, sailors stand among wrecked airplanes at Ford Island Naval Air Station as they watch the explosion of the USS Shaw in the background, during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)
In 1941, the Imperial Japanese navy launched a surprise attack on the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii as part of a plan to pre-empt any American military response to Japan’s planned conquest of Southeast Asian territories; the raid, which claimed some 2,400 American lives, prompted the United States to declare war against Japan the next day. In this image provided by the U.S. Navy, sailors stand among wrecked airplanes at Ford Island Naval Air Station as they watch the explosion of the USS Shaw in the background, during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy) (AP)
Rescue workers carry an unidentified victim from the still-blazing Winecoff Hotel in Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 7, 1946.  Officials estimate that over a hundred may be dead.  (AP Photo)
In 1946, fire broke out at the Winecoff Hotel in Atlanta; the blaze killed 119 people, including hotel founder W. Frank Winecoff. Here, rescue workers carry an unidentified victim from the still-blazing Winecoff Hotel.  (AP Photo) (AP/Anonymous)
Officials sift through wreckage found at the site of Pacific Southwest Airlines flight 1771, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1987, Cayucos, Calif. The jetliner crashed Monday, afternoon killing all 43 people aboard. Upper right is where the jetliner hit disintegrating into thousands of small pieces. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon)
In 1987, 43 people were killed after a gunman aboard a Pacific Southwest Airlines jetliner in California apparently opened fire on a fellow passenger, the pilots and himself, causing the plane to crash. Here, officials sift through wreckage found at the site on Dec. 8, 1987, Cayucos, Calif. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Lennox McLendon)
Secretary of State George Shultz welcomes Soviet Secretary General of the Communist Party Mikhail Gorbachev at Andrews Air Force Base on Monday, December 1987. Gorbachev is in the United States for talks with President Reagan on peace. (AP Photo/Boris Yurchenko)
In 1987, Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev set foot on American soil for the first time, arriving for a Washington summit with President Ronald Reagan. Here, Secretary of State George Shultz welcomes Gorbachev at Andrews Air Force Base. (AP Photo/Boris Yurchenko) (AP/Boris Yurchenko)
Afghan President Hamid Karzai, center, stands next to Chief Justice Fazl Hadi Shinwari, right, as he takes the oath of office during a ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Kabul Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2004. Karzai was sworn in Tuesday as Afghanistan's first popularly elected president, calling for sustained help from the international community to bolster a young democracy that sill faces the twin threats of terrorism and drugs. (AP Photo/SHAH Marai, POOL)
In 2004, Hamid Karzai was sworn in as Afghanistan’s first popularly elected president. Here, Karzai, center, stands next to Chief Justice Fazl Hadi Shinwari, right, as he takes the oath of office during a ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Kabul Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2004. (AP Photo/SHAH Marai, POOL) (AP/SHAH MARAI)
Ferdinand Marcos, Imelda Marcos
In 1972, Imelda Marcos, wife of Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos, was stabbed and seriously wounded by an assailant who was shot dead by her bodyguards. FILE – In this Sept. 26, 1982 file photo, Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos and First Lady Imelda Marcos appear at a rally in the Los Angeles Sports Arena. A multimillion-dollar trove of seized Impressionist art believed to have been owned by the regime of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos has sat for five years in a climate-controlled New York warehouse, the subject of a bitter legal fight. At issue is whether the 50 works should go to thousands of victims of the now-dead dictator, to the current Filipino government or to the secretary to Imelda Marcos, who contends she was rightfully given some of the art as gifts. (AP Photo, File) (AP)
Rescue teams and survivors search for victims in the debris in Leninakan, Soviet Armenia, Dec. 12, 1988, after last week's devastating earthquake.  (AP Photo/Pool)
In 1988, a major earthquake in the Soviet Union devastated northern Armenia; official estimates put the death toll at 25,000. Rescue teams and survivors search for victims in the debris in Leninakan, Soviet Armenia, Dec. 12, 1988, after last week’s devastating earthquake. (AP Photo/Pool) (AP/Anonymous)
FILE- In this Dec. 13, 1993 file photo, Carolyn McCarthy, center, stands by the casket of her slain husband Dennis McCarthy at Holy Road Cemetery in Westbury, N.Y., Dec. 13, 1993. Mr. McCarthy was shot to death aboard a Long Island Railroad commuter train and their son, Kevin, was critically injured as well. In what was at the time one of the worst mass killings in history, a deranged gunman opened fire aboard a Long Island Rail Road train filled with commuters leaving New York City. Six people died and 19 were injured.  (AP Photo/Mike Albans, File)
In 1993, a gunman opened fire on a Long Island Rail Road commuter train, killing six people and wounding 19. (The shooter was later sentenced to a minimum of 200 years in prison.) FILE- In this Dec. 13, 1993 file photo, Carolyn McCarthy, center, stands by the casket of her slain husband Dennis McCarthy at Holy Road Cemetery in Westbury, N.Y., Dec. 13, 1993. Mr. McCarthy was shot to death aboard a Long Island Railroad commuter train and their son, Kevin, was critically injured as well. In what was at the time one of the worst mass killings in history, a deranged gunman opened fire aboard a Long Island Rail Road train filled with commuters leaving New York City. Six people died and 19 were injured. (AP Photo/Mike Albans, File)
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In this image provided by the U.S. Navy, sailors stand among wrecked airplanes at Ford Island Naval Air Station as they watch the explosion of the USS Shaw in the background, during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)
Rescue workers carry an unidentified victim from the still-blazing Winecoff Hotel in Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 7, 1946.  Officials estimate that over a hundred may be dead.  (AP Photo)
Officials sift through wreckage found at the site of Pacific Southwest Airlines flight 1771, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1987, Cayucos, Calif. The jetliner crashed Monday, afternoon killing all 43 people aboard. Upper right is where the jetliner hit disintegrating into thousands of small pieces. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon)
Secretary of State George Shultz welcomes Soviet Secretary General of the Communist Party Mikhail Gorbachev at Andrews Air Force Base on Monday, December 1987. Gorbachev is in the United States for talks with President Reagan on peace. (AP Photo/Boris Yurchenko)
Afghan President Hamid Karzai, center, stands next to Chief Justice Fazl Hadi Shinwari, right, as he takes the oath of office during a ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Kabul Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2004. Karzai was sworn in Tuesday as Afghanistan's first popularly elected president, calling for sustained help from the international community to bolster a young democracy that sill faces the twin threats of terrorism and drugs. (AP Photo/SHAH Marai, POOL)
Ferdinand Marcos, Imelda Marcos
Rescue teams and survivors search for victims in the debris in Leninakan, Soviet Armenia, Dec. 12, 1988, after last week's devastating earthquake.  (AP Photo/Pool)
FILE- In this Dec. 13, 1993 file photo, Carolyn McCarthy, center, stands by the casket of her slain husband Dennis McCarthy at Holy Road Cemetery in Westbury, N.Y., Dec. 13, 1993. Mr. McCarthy was shot to death aboard a Long Island Railroad commuter train and their son, Kevin, was critically injured as well. In what was at the time one of the worst mass killings in history, a deranged gunman opened fire aboard a Long Island Rail Road train filled with commuters leaving New York City. Six people died and 19 were injured.  (AP Photo/Mike Albans, File)

Today is Friday, Dec. 7, the 341st day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Dec. 7, 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii as part of its plan to conquer Southeast Asian territories; the raid, which claimed some 2,400 American lives, prompted the United States to declare war against Japan the next day.

On this date:

In 43 B.C., Roman statesman and scholar Marcus Tullius Cicero was slain at the order of the Second Triumvirate.

In 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

In 1842, the New York Philharmonic performed its first concert.

In 1911, China abolished the requirement that men wear their hair in a queue, or ponytail.

In 1917, during World War I, the United States declared war on Austria-Hungary.

In 1946, fire broke out at the Winecoff (WYN’-kahf) Hotel in Atlanta; the blaze killed 119 people, including hotel founder W. Frank Winecoff.

In 1972, America’s last moon mission to date was launched as Apollo 17 blasted off from Cape Canaveral. Imelda Marcos, wife of Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos, was stabbed and seriously wounded by an assailant who was shot dead by her bodyguards.

In 1987, 43 people were killed after a gunman aboard a Pacific Southwest Airlines jetliner in California apparently opened fire on a fellow passenger, the pilots and himself, causing the plane to crash. Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev set foot on American soil for the first time, arriving for a Washington summit with President Ronald Reagan.

In 1988, a major earthquake in the Soviet Union devastated northern Armenia; official estimates put the death toll at 25-thousand.

In 1993, a gunman opened fire on a Long Island Rail Road commuter train, killing six people and wounding 19. (The shooter was later sentenced to a minimum of 200 years in prison.)

In 2001, Taliban forces abandoned their last bastion in Afghanistan, fleeing the southern city of Kandahar.

In 2004, Hamid Karzai (HAH’-mihd KAHR’-zeye) was sworn in as Afghanistan’s first popularly elected president.

Ten years ago: President-elect Barack Obama introduced retired Gen. Eric Shinseki (shin-SEHK’-ee) as his choice to head the Veterans Affairs Department. Actress-singer Barbra Streisand, actor Morgan Freeman, country singer George Jones, dancer and choreographer Twyla Tharp and musicians Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey of The Who received Kennedy Center Honors.

Five years ago: North Korea freed an 85-year-old U.S. veteran of the Korean War after a weekslong detention, ending the saga of Merrill Newman’s attempt to visit the North as a tourist six decades after he oversaw a group of South Korean wartime guerrillas still loathed by Pyongyang.

One year ago: Democratic Sen. Al Franken said he would resign after a series of sexual harassment allegations; he took a parting shot at President Donald Trump, describing him as “a man who has bragged on tape about his history of sexual assault.” Republican Rep. Trent Franks of Arizona said he would resign, after revealing that he discussed surrogacy with two female staffers. A brush fire driven by gusty winds exploded north of San Diego, destroying mobile homes in a retirement community and killing race horses at a training facility. A white former South Carolina police officer, Michael Slager, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for the fatal shooting of an unarmed black motorist, Walter Scott, in North Charleston in 2015. Demonstrators in the Gaza Strip burned U.S. flags and pictures of President Trump, and Palestinian protesters clashed with Israeli forces in east Jerusalem and the West Bank, after Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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