Photos: Millions watch eclipse across US

WASHINGTON — For the first time in 99 years, a total solar eclipse crossed the United States on Monday.

An estimated audience of 200 million people watched the moon move in front of the sun, either in person, on TV or online.

If you missed this one, the next total solar eclipse won’t be until April 8, 2024 when it will move across North America from Mexico to Canada.

The next solar eclipse to go coast-to-coast won’t be until 2045.

If you’re waiting to see a total solar eclipse here in D.C., you’ll be waiting awhile. That won’t happen until Sept. 12, 2444.

Here are some photos of how people across the country and watching the eclipse.

The eclipse captured with an orange filter Dobsonian telescope. (Courtesy WTOP listener)
The eclipse captured with an orange filter Dobsonian telescope. (Courtesy WTOP listener)

A view of the eclipse from Silver Spring, Maryland. The eclipse was about 80 percent totality in the D.C. area. (Courtesy Robert Orrison)
A view of the eclipse from Silver Spring, Maryland. The eclipse was about 80 percent totality in the D.C. area. (Courtesy Robert Orrison)

View of the eclipse from Laurel, Maryland. (Courtesy Glenn Harris)
View of the eclipse from Laurel, Maryland. (Courtesy Glenn Harris)

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron watch the solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington.  (AP Andrew Harnik)
President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron watch the solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington. (AP Andrew Harnik)

Taken with a pinhole camera 13 minutes after maximum eclipse in Fairfax, Virginia. (Courtesy WTOP listener)
Taken with a pinhole camera 13 minutes after maximum eclipse in Fairfax, Virginia. (Courtesy WTOP listener)

The Wolin family watches the eclipse from Fort Belvoir. (Courtesy WTOP listener)
The Wolin family watches the eclipse from Fort Belvoir. (Courtesy WTOP listener)

Esther Owolabi looks up at the sky at the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Esther Owolabi looks up at the sky at the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)

People in D.C. take in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
People in D.C. take in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

A view of the eclipse from Laurel, Maryland. (Courtesy Glenn Harris)
A view of the eclipse from Laurel, Maryland. (Courtesy Glenn Harris)

White House staff members watch the eclipse in front of the West Wing of the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
White House staff members watch the eclipse in front of the West Wing of the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

A view of the eclipse from a cellphone through NASA glasses near Lake Anna, Virginia at around 2:40 p.m. (Courtesy Sandy Garner)
A view of the eclipse from a cellphone through NASA glasses near Lake Anna, Virginia at around 2:40 p.m. (Courtesy Sandy Garner)

Martha Harris and her family were in from New York City and made a point of taking in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Martha Harris and her family were in from New York City and made a point of taking in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

The partial eclipse as seen in Alexandria, Virginia. (Courtesy Doretha Forston Gilliam)
The partial eclipse as seen in Alexandria, Virginia. (Courtesy Doretha Forston Gilliam)

A grandmother and her three grandsons look up at the solar eclipse. (Courtesy Shannon Finney Photography)
A grandmother and her three grandsons look up at the solar eclipse. (Courtesy Shannon Finney Photography)

The sun bursts through the clouds after the eclipse in Bethesda, Maryland. (Courtesy Mareth Babcock)
The sun bursts through the clouds after the eclipse in Bethesda, Maryland. (Courtesy Mareth Babcock)

A family gazes skyward during the eclipse. (Courtesy Kyle Cooper)
A family gazes skyward during the eclipse. (Courtesy Kyle Cooper)

The eclipse as seen through pin holes in tree leaves in Fredericksburg, Virginia. (Courtesy Sharron Rowe)
The eclipse as seen through pin holes in tree leaves in Fredericksburg, Virginia. (Courtesy Sharron Rowe)

Shiva and Subash John take another look at the the solar eclipse, while their son Joshua looks at what is going on on social media. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Shiva and Subash John take another look at the the solar eclipse, while their son Joshua looks at what is going on on social media. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

View of the eclipse from the D.C. area. (Courtesy Abdul Khan)
View of the eclipse from the D.C. area. (Courtesy Abdul Khan)

Stellar Chen, who has a name that was singularly appropriate for today's event, takes in the solar eclipse in D.C. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Stellar Chen, who has a name that was singularly appropriate for today’s event, takes in the solar eclipse in D.C. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

After the eclipse, a hint of a rainbow. (Credit David Bullock, Courtesy Kyle Cooper)
After the eclipse, a hint of a rainbow. (Credit David Bullock, Courtesy Kyle Cooper)

Garthy and Jerry Allen, James and Janie McDaniel and Jasmine and Gregory Carroll stepped outside to take a look at the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Garthy and Jerry Allen, James and Janie McDaniel and Jasmine and Gregory Carroll stepped outside to take a look at the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  The moon eclipses the sun above the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
The moon eclipses the sun above the campus of Southern Illinois University on Aug. 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Joshua, Subash and Emily John of McLean, Virginia, take in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Joshua, Subash and Emily John of McLean, Virginia, take in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

Close obscure the moon as it covers a part of the sun during a partial eclipse in Richmond, Va., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Close obscure the moon as it covers a part of the sun during a partial eclipse in Richmond, Va., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Joya Smith, Roshni Nedgungadi and Terrance Woodbury shared a spot on a grassy hill alongside the National Mall to watch the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Joya Smith, Roshni Nedgungadi and Terrance Woodbury shared a spot on a grassy hill alongside the National Mall to watch the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21  (EDITORS NOTE: Multiple exposures were combined to produce this image.) In this NASA handout composite image,  the progression of a partial solar eclipse August 21, 2017 over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.   (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
In this NASA handout composite image, the progression of a partial solar eclipse August 21, 2017 over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)

Martha Harris and her family, in from New York City, check out the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Martha Harris and her family, in from New York City, check out the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)

ISLE OF PALMS, SC - AUGUST 21:   Solar eclipse watchers were ecstatic as the clouds broke minutes before totality during the total solar eclipse from the one of last vantage points where totality will be visible on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, S.C.. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. The total solar eclipse on June 8, 1918, crossed the States from Washington to Florida.  (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
Solar eclipse watchers were ecstatic as the clouds broke minutes before totality during the total solar eclipse from the one of last vantage points where totality was visible on Aug. 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, S.C.. It’s been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. The total solar eclipse on June 8, 1918, crossed the States from Washington to Florida. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

One cool looking pup enjoying the eclipse! If your pet didn't wear safety glasses, don't worry. Since pets are unlikely to look directly at the sun, they are at minimal risk of eye damage. (Courtesy Kyle Cooper)
One cool looking pup enjoying the eclipse! If your pet didn’t wear safety glasses, don’t worry. Since pets are unlikely to look directly at the sun, they are at minimal risk of eye damage. (Courtesy Kyle Cooper)

A plane descends overhead during the eclipse at 2:43 p.m. from Gravelly Point in Arlington County, Virginia. (Courtesy Brandon Millman)
A plane descends overhead during the eclipse at 2:43 p.m. from Gravelly Point in Arlington County, Virginia. (Courtesy Brandon Millman)

Sara and Hadeer waited 20 minutes for their glasses at the Air and Space Museum so they could safely watch the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Sara and Hadeer waited 20 minutes for their glasses at the Air and Space Museum so they could safely watch the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)

Photo of the eclipse from Alexandria, Virginia. (Courtesy Lisa Curtin)
Photo of the eclipse from Alexandria, Virginia. (Courtesy Lisa Curtin)

Rachel Nania, Living Editor at WTOP, takes a quick break from work to look up at the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)
Rachel Nania, Living Editor at WTOP, takes a quick break from work to look up at the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)

A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area, the eclipse was about 80 percent of totality in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area, the eclipse was about 80 percent of totality in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)

Michael O'Connell, Senior Digital Editor at Federal News Radio, gets a glimpse of the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)
Michael O’Connell, Senior Digital Editor at Federal News Radio, gets a glimpse of the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)

A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)

Sarah Beth Hensley, Senior Digital Editor at WTOP, stepped out of the glass enclosed nerve center to take a peek at the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)
Sarah Beth Hensley, Senior Digital Editor at WTOP, stepped out of the glass enclosed nerve center to take a peek at the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)

If you want to see a total eclipse in D.C., you'll have to wait awhile. The next one won't be for more than 400 years. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
If you want to see a total eclipse in D.C., you’ll have to wait awhile. The next one won’t be for more than 400 years. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)

People outside of the National Cathedral ahead of the eclipse. (WTOP/Abigail Constantino)
People outside the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., view the eclipse. (WTOP/Abigail Constantino)

Cloud cover blocked the view of the eclipse for some, but did make it easier to take photos. (Courtesy Rangbhar Pradeep)
Cloud cover blocked the view of the eclipse for some, but did make it easier to take photos. (Courtesy Rangbhar Pradeep)

A view of the eclipse through a box in Fredericksburg, Virginia. (Courtesy Ken Miller)
A view of the eclipse through a box in Fredericksburg, Virginia. (Courtesy Ken Miller)

People look up to the sky for a glimpse of the eclipse, they won't get another chance to see something like this for another seven years. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
People look up to the sky for a glimpse of the eclipse, they won’t get another chance to see something like this for another seven years. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)

A projected image of the eclipse just after totality from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)
A projected image of the eclipse just after totality from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)

People in Dupont Circle gaze skyward ahead of the eclipse. (Courtesy Matt Ritter)
People in Dupont Circle gaze skyward ahead of the eclipse. (Courtesy Matt Ritter)

The sun peeks through the clouds after the eclipse in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
The sun peeks through the clouds after the eclipse in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

Technically, pets don't need to wear safety glasses since it's unlikely they'll look directly at the sun. That said, better safe than sorry and it IS a cute look. (WTOP/Mike Jakaitis)
Technically, pets don’t need to wear safety glasses since it’s unlikely they’ll look directly at the sun. That said, better safe than sorry and it IS a cute look. (WTOP/Mike Jakaitis)

Members of WTOP stepped out for a quick look at the eclipse outside. (WTOP/Suann Lee)
Members of WTOP stepped out for a quick look at the eclipse outside. (WTOP/Suann Lee)

The moon almost totally eclipses the sun during a near total solar eclipse as seen from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
The moon almost totally eclipses the sun during a near total solar eclipse as seen from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

The moon covers the sun during a total eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Redmond, Ore. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
The moon covers the sun during a total eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Redmond, Ore. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

It's not just humans who are looking forward to the eclipse! WTOP's Mike Murillo found this pair of celebrities looking up to the skies outside of Lincoln Center in New York City. (WTOP/Mike Murillo)
It’s not just humans who are looking forward to the eclipse! WTOP’s Mike Murillo found this pair of celebrities looking up to the skies outside of Lincoln Center in New York City. (WTOP/Mike Murillo)

Some cloud cover around the sun a few minutes before totality. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)
Some cloud cover around the sun a few minutes before totality. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)

Ezra Packham, of Jacksonville, Fla., looks through his solar glasses in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. Ezra and his family said the wanted to come to the Isle of Palms because they wanted to be on the beach and the city of Isle of Palms was giving away solar glasses. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Ezra Packham, of Jacksonville, Fla., looks through his solar glasses in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. Ezra and his family said the wanted to come to the Isle of Palms because they wanted to be on the beach and the city of Isle of Palms was giving away solar glasses. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

A projected image of the eclipse from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)
A projected image of the eclipse from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)

Volunteers at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum passed out more than 20,000 pairs of eclipse glasses. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Volunteers at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum passed out more than 20,000 pairs of eclipse glasses. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)

ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21:  In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse  August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.   (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)

ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21:  In this NASA handout, the Sun is seen as it rises behind Jack Mountain head of the solar eclipse, August 21, 2017, Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse will sweep across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.  (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
In this NASA handout, the Sun is seen as it rises behind Jack Mountain head of the solar eclipse, Aug. 21, 2017, Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)

A woman watches the eclipse through a safety visor at the Air and Space Museum. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
A woman watches the eclipse through a safety visor at the Air and Space Museum. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)

ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21:  In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.   (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington.  (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)

Kids kick back and relax while watching the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)
Kids kick back and relax while watching the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)

Two people at the Air and Space Museum in D.C. wear their protective glasses ahead of the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Two people at the Air and Space Museum in D.C. wear their protective glasses ahead of the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)

A family sets up a tent at their campsite at sunrise for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
A family sets up a tent at their campsite at sunrise for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Visitors at the Air and Space Museum look up at the sky to get a glimpse of the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Visitors at the Air and Space Museum look up at the sky to get a glimpse of the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)

From Southern Illinois University, which is in the path of totality, crowds gather for Monday's total eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
From Southern Illinois University, which is in the path of totality, crowds gather for Monday’s total eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

NASA with a first, 6k real time imagery of the sun from their onsite solar lab in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
NASA with a first, 6k real time imagery of the sun from their on-site solar lab in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

Media sets up in preparation for the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 in Carbondale, Illinois. Carbondale is only a few miles north from the point of greatest duration of the elicpse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Media sets up in preparation for the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 in Carbondale, Illinois. Carbondale is only a few miles north from the point of greatest duration of the elicpse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

NASA with a first, 6k real time imagery of the sun from their onsite solar lab here in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
NASA with a first, 6k real time imagery of the sun from their on-site solar lab here in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

A view of the sun from NASA's onsite solar lab in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
A view of the sun from NASA’s on-site solar lab in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

Catalina Gaitan, from Portland, Ore., tries to shoot a photo of the rising sun through her eclipse glasses at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Catalina Gaitan, from Portland, Ore., tries to shoot a photo of the rising sun through her eclipse glasses at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Schweta Kulkarni, from left, Rhea Kulkarni and Saanvi Kulkarni, from Seattle, try out their eclipse glasses on the sun at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., early Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Schweta Kulkarni, from left, Rhea Kulkarni and Saanvi Kulkarni, from Seattle, try out their eclipse glasses on the sun at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., early Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Katie Vega and her dog Toby wait for the solar eclipse in Weiser, Idaho, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Katie and her husband Vincent traveled from Sacramento. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)
Katie Vega and her dog Toby wait for the solar eclipse in Weiser, Idaho, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Katie and her husband Vincent traveled from Sacramento. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)

People wait in line to buy viewing glasses for the eclipse at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles early Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
People wait in line to buy viewing glasses for the eclipse at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles early Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

CASPER, WY - AUGUST 21:  Brian Marriott of Boston, Massachusetts looks in a storage container on top of his car before watching the solar eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming.  Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Brian Marriott of Boston, Massachusetts looks in a storage container on top of his car before watching the solar eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on Aug. 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the “path of totality” in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  People wait for the gates to open at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University to watch the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
People wait for the gates to open at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University to watch the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  A person dressed as a Star Wars Stormtrooper poses as people arrive at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University to watch the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
A person dressed as a Star Wars Stormtrooper poses as people arrive at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University to watch the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

NASA takes the stage at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
NASA takes the stage at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

Kids in Carbondale, Illinois await the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Kids in Carbondale, Illinois await the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

The temperature was in the 90s in Carbondale, Illinois, but that didn't keep people away from viewing the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
The temperature was in the 90s in Carbondale, Illinois, but that didn’t keep people away from viewing the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

Kids at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois for the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Kids at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois for the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

Before the eclipse in Brevard, North Carolina, a projected image of the sun from a telescope onto white cardboard. The dark spots are sun spots. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)
Before the eclipse in Brevard, North Carolina, a projected image of the sun from a telescope onto white cardboard. The dark spots are sun spots. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)

Portland Taiko drummer Karen Tingey performs in front of a live video shot of the sun to introduce the solar eclipse from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Portland Taiko drummer Karen Tingey performs in front of a live video shot of the sun to introduce the solar eclipse from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

ISLE OF PALMS, SC - AUGUST 21:  Solar eclipse watchers on the beach hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
Solar eclipse watchers on the beach hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on Aug. 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It’s been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the “path of totality” in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

A crowd wears protective glasses as they watch the beginning of the solar eclipse from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
A crowd wears protective glasses as they watch the beginning of the solar eclipse from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Kids in Carbondale, Illinois look up to the sky ahead of the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Kids in Carbondale, Illinois look up to the sky ahead of the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

People await the eclipse in Carbondale, Illinois. Carbondale is in the path of totality and will see the longest duration of the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
People await the eclipse in Carbondale, Illinois. Carbondale is in the path of totality and will see the longest duration of the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)

The moon begins to cover the sun in Jefferson City, Missouri. (WTOP/Kristi King)
The moon begins to cover the sun in Jefferson City, Missouri. (WTOP/Kristi King)

CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  C. D. Olsen adjust one of his vintage style cameras which he plans to use during the total solar eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
C. D. Olsen adjust one of his vintage style cameras which he plans to use during the total solar eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University on Aug. 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Val Carney, from Asheville, N.C., writes in the sand in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. The city of Isle of Palms hosted a beach party "Get Eclipsed on IOP". (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Val Carney, from Asheville, N.C., writes in the sand in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. The city of Isle of Palms hosted a beach party “Get Eclipsed on IOP”. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

The line to get in stretched around the block and people waited for more than an hour to get free glasses at the Air and Space Museum in D.C.

People waited in line for more than an hour to watch the eclipse from the Air and Space Museum. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
People waited in line for more than an hour to watch the eclipse from the Air and Space Museum. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)

D.C. is not in the path of totality for this eclipse. There won't be a total solar eclipse in D.C. for more than 400 years. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)
D.C. is not in the path of totality for this eclipse. There won’t be a total solar eclipse in D.C. for more than 400 years. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)

A view of the eclipse from a projected image of the sun from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)
A view of the eclipse from a projected image of the sun from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)

The view from Bowie, courtesy of Njama Jones

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The eclipse captured with an orange filter Dobsonian telescope. (Courtesy WTOP listener)
A view of the eclipse from Silver Spring, Maryland. The eclipse was about 80 percent totality in the D.C. area. (Courtesy Robert Orrison)
View of the eclipse from Laurel, Maryland. (Courtesy Glenn Harris)
President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron watch the solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington.  (AP Andrew Harnik)
Taken with a pinhole camera 13 minutes after maximum eclipse in Fairfax, Virginia. (Courtesy WTOP listener)
The Wolin family watches the eclipse from Fort Belvoir. (Courtesy WTOP listener)
Esther Owolabi looks up at the sky at the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
People in D.C. take in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
A view of the eclipse from Laurel, Maryland. (Courtesy Glenn Harris)
White House staff members watch the eclipse in front of the West Wing of the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
A view of the eclipse from a cellphone through NASA glasses near Lake Anna, Virginia at around 2:40 p.m. (Courtesy Sandy Garner)
Martha Harris and her family were in from New York City and made a point of taking in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
The partial eclipse as seen in Alexandria, Virginia. (Courtesy Doretha Forston Gilliam)
A grandmother and her three grandsons look up at the solar eclipse. (Courtesy Shannon Finney Photography)
The sun bursts through the clouds after the eclipse in Bethesda, Maryland. (Courtesy Mareth Babcock)
A family gazes skyward during the eclipse. (Courtesy Kyle Cooper)
The eclipse as seen through pin holes in tree leaves in Fredericksburg, Virginia. (Courtesy Sharron Rowe)
Shiva and Subash John take another look at the the solar eclipse, while their son Joshua looks at what is going on on social media. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
View of the eclipse from the D.C. area. (Courtesy Abdul Khan)
Stellar Chen, who has a name that was singularly appropriate for today's event, takes in the solar eclipse in D.C. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
After the eclipse, a hint of a rainbow. (Credit David Bullock, Courtesy Kyle Cooper)
Garthy and Jerry Allen, James and Janie McDaniel and Jasmine and Gregory Carroll stepped outside to take a look at the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  The moon eclipses the sun above the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Joshua, Subash and Emily John of McLean, Virginia, take in the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Close obscure the moon as it covers a part of the sun during a partial eclipse in Richmond, Va., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Joya Smith, Roshni Nedgungadi and Terrance Woodbury shared a spot on a grassy hill alongside the National Mall to watch the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21  (EDITORS NOTE: Multiple exposures were combined to produce this image.) In this NASA handout composite image,  the progression of a partial solar eclipse August 21, 2017 over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.   (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
Martha Harris and her family, in from New York City, check out the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
ISLE OF PALMS, SC - AUGUST 21:   Solar eclipse watchers were ecstatic as the clouds broke minutes before totality during the total solar eclipse from the one of last vantage points where totality will be visible on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, S.C.. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. The total solar eclipse on June 8, 1918, crossed the States from Washington to Florida.  (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
One cool looking pup enjoying the eclipse! If your pet didn't wear safety glasses, don't worry. Since pets are unlikely to look directly at the sun, they are at minimal risk of eye damage. (Courtesy Kyle Cooper)
A plane descends overhead during the eclipse at 2:43 p.m. from Gravelly Point in Arlington County, Virginia. (Courtesy Brandon Millman)
Sara and Hadeer waited 20 minutes for their glasses at the Air and Space Museum so they could safely watch the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Photo of the eclipse from Alexandria, Virginia. (Courtesy Lisa Curtin)
Rachel Nania, Living Editor at WTOP, takes a quick break from work to look up at the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)
A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area, the eclipse was about 80 percent of totality in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
Michael O'Connell, Senior Digital Editor at Federal News Radio, gets a glimpse of the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)
A view of the eclipse in the D.C. area. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
Sarah Beth Hensley, Senior Digital Editor at WTOP, stepped out of the glass enclosed nerve center to take a peek at the eclipse. (WTOP/Sarah Beth Hensley)
If you want to see a total eclipse in D.C., you'll have to wait awhile. The next one won't be for more than 400 years. (WTOP/Jamie Forzato)
People outside of the National Cathedral ahead of the eclipse. (WTOP/Abigail Constantino)
Cloud cover blocked the view of the eclipse for some, but did make it easier to take photos. (Courtesy Rangbhar Pradeep)
A view of the eclipse through a box in Fredericksburg, Virginia. (Courtesy Ken Miller)
People look up to the sky for a glimpse of the eclipse, they won't get another chance to see something like this for another seven years. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
A projected image of the eclipse just after totality from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)
People in Dupont Circle gaze skyward ahead of the eclipse. (Courtesy Matt Ritter)
The sun peeks through the clouds after the eclipse in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Technically, pets don't need to wear safety glasses since it's unlikely they'll look directly at the sun. That said, better safe than sorry and it IS a cute look. (WTOP/Mike Jakaitis)
Members of WTOP stepped out for a quick look at the eclipse outside. (WTOP/Suann Lee)
The moon almost totally eclipses the sun during a near total solar eclipse as seen from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
The moon covers the sun during a total eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Redmond, Ore. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
It's not just humans who are looking forward to the eclipse! WTOP's Mike Murillo found this pair of celebrities looking up to the skies outside of Lincoln Center in New York City. (WTOP/Mike Murillo)
Some cloud cover around the sun a few minutes before totality. (WTOP/Dave Dildine)
Ezra Packham, of Jacksonville, Fla., looks through his solar glasses in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. Ezra and his family said the wanted to come to the Isle of Palms because they wanted to be on the beach and the city of Isle of Palms was giving away solar glasses. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
A projected image of the eclipse from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)
Volunteers at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum passed out more than 20,000 pairs of eclipse glasses. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21:  In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse  August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.   (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21:  In this NASA handout, the Sun is seen as it rises behind Jack Mountain head of the solar eclipse, August 21, 2017, Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse will sweep across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.  (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
A woman watches the eclipse through a safety visor at the Air and Space Museum. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21:  In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.   (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
Kids kick back and relax while watching the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)
Two people at the Air and Space Museum in D.C. wear their protective glasses ahead of the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
A family sets up a tent at their campsite at sunrise for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Visitors at the Air and Space Museum look up at the sky to get a glimpse of the eclipse. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
From Southern Illinois University, which is in the path of totality, crowds gather for Monday's total eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
NASA with a first, 6k real time imagery of the sun from their onsite solar lab in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Media sets up in preparation for the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 in Carbondale, Illinois. Carbondale is only a few miles north from the point of greatest duration of the elicpse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
NASA with a first, 6k real time imagery of the sun from their onsite solar lab here in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
A view of the sun from NASA's onsite solar lab in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Catalina Gaitan, from Portland, Ore., tries to shoot a photo of the rising sun through her eclipse glasses at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Schweta Kulkarni, from left, Rhea Kulkarni and Saanvi Kulkarni, from Seattle, try out their eclipse glasses on the sun at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., early Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Katie Vega and her dog Toby wait for the solar eclipse in Weiser, Idaho, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Katie and her husband Vincent traveled from Sacramento. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)
People wait in line to buy viewing glasses for the eclipse at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles early Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
CASPER, WY - AUGUST 21:  Brian Marriott of Boston, Massachusetts looks in a storage container on top of his car before watching the solar eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming.  Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  People wait for the gates to open at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University to watch the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  A person dressed as a Star Wars Stormtrooper poses as people arrive at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University to watch the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
NASA takes the stage at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Kids in Carbondale, Illinois await the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
The temperature was in the 90s in Carbondale, Illinois, but that didn't keep people away from viewing the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Kids at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois for the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
Before the eclipse in Brevard, North Carolina, a projected image of the sun from a telescope onto white cardboard. The dark spots are sun spots. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)
Portland Taiko drummer Karen Tingey performs in front of a live video shot of the sun to introduce the solar eclipse from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
ISLE OF PALMS, SC - AUGUST 21:  Solar eclipse watchers on the beach hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
A crowd wears protective glasses as they watch the beginning of the solar eclipse from Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Kids in Carbondale, Illinois look up to the sky ahead of the solar eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
People await the eclipse in Carbondale, Illinois. Carbondale is in the path of totality and will see the longest duration of the eclipse. (WTOP/Steve Dresner)
The moon begins to cover the sun in Jefferson City, Missouri. (WTOP/Kristi King)
CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21:  C. D. Olsen adjust one of his vintage style cameras which he plans to use during the total solar eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Val Carney, from Asheville, N.C., writes in the sand in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. The city of Isle of Palms hosted a beach party "Get Eclipsed on IOP". (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
People waited in line for more than an hour to watch the eclipse from the Air and Space Museum. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
D.C. is not in the path of totality for this eclipse. There won't be a total solar eclipse in D.C. for more than 400 years. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)
A view of the eclipse from a projected image of the sun from a telescope onto white cardboard in Brevard, North Carolina. (Courtesy Mike Stinneford)

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