Interfaith worshippers pray for Sri Lanka bombing victims

Dozens of the faithful gathered outside the Ashburn Mosque in Sterling, Virginia, to pray and offer hope following the devastating, coordinated attacks in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Dozens of the faithful gathered outside the Ashburn Mosque in Sterling, Virginia, to pray and offer hope following the devastating, coordinated attacks in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Members of Christian, Muslim, Jews, Sikh and Hindu faiths attended the gathering Monday evening. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Members of Christian, Muslim, Jews, Sikh and Hindu faiths attended the gathering Monday evening. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
By Monday night, the death toll in the coordinated Sri Lanka attacks had risen to over 300. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
By Monday night, the death toll in the coordinated Sri Lanka attacks had risen to over 300. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Rabbi Amy Sapowith addresses the crowd. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Rabbi Amy Sapowith addresses the crowd. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
A sign at the event reads "Love Not Hate." (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
A sign at the event reads “Love Not Hate.” (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
"Our thoughts, our prayers are with the Sri Lanka community, the Christian community and all faiths in Sri Lanka," said Rizwan Jaka, chair of the board of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
“Our thoughts, our prayers are with the Sri Lanka community, the Christian community and all faiths in Sri Lanka,” said Rizwan Jaka, chair of the board of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Worshippers walked between Ashburn Mosque, Beth Chaverim Reform Congregation Synagogue. Mourners quietly walked from the mosque to the synagogue and Christian Fellowship Church. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
"I hope that the churches there will feel that we were with them in spirit and in prayer," said Pastor Mike Trivett of Christian Fellowship Church. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
“I hope that the churches there will feel that we were with them in spirit and in prayer,” said Pastor Mike Trivett of Christian Fellowship Church. (WTOP/Dick Uliano) (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
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Dozens of the faithful gathered outside the Ashburn Mosque in Sterling, Virginia, to pray and offer hope following the devastating, coordinated attacks in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Members of Christian, Muslim, Jews, Sikh and Hindu faiths attended the gathering Monday evening. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
By Monday night, the death toll in the coordinated Sri Lanka attacks had risen to over 300. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Rabbi Amy Sapowith addresses the crowd. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
A sign at the event reads "Love Not Hate." (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
"Our thoughts, our prayers are with the Sri Lanka community, the Christian community and all faiths in Sri Lanka," said Rizwan Jaka, chair of the board of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
"I hope that the churches there will feel that we were with them in spirit and in prayer," said Pastor Mike Trivett of Christian Fellowship Church. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

Muslims, Christians, Jews and members of other faiths gathered Monday evening for a sunset memorial service to remember the victims and survivors of the Easter Sunday terrorist attack in Sri Lanka.

“Our thoughts, our prayers are with the Sri Lanka community, the Christian community and all faiths in Sri Lanka,” said Rizwan Jaka, chair of the board of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society.

Dozens of the faithful gathered outside the Ashburn Mosque of the Adams Center, one of the largest Muslim communities in the D.C. area. One by one, they prayed and offered hope following the devastating, coordinated attacks.

“When there are horrific tragedies we come together in solidarity as one inch of healing, working together inch by inch for healing,” Jaka said. 

Steps away from the mosque is the Beth Chaverim Reform Congregation Synagogue, mourners quietly walked from the mosque to the synagogue with flameless tea lights in hand. They then crossed the street to continue prayers outside the Christian Fellowship Church.

“We’ll continue to grow stronger in our community. We’ll continue to have strangers become neighbors and neighbors become friends,” said Rabbi Amy Sapowith, of Beth Chaverim Reform Congregation Synagogue.

Representatives of the Hindu and Sikh faiths also offered prayers.

“I hope that the churches there will feel that we were with them in spirit and in prayer,” said Pastor Mike Trivett, director of outreach at Christian Fellowship Church.

WTOP’s Dick Uliano reported from Ashburn, Virginia.

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