How to report blocked drains, flooding

Storm drains in the region are collecting debris, trash and fallen foliage as crews work to keep them clear to prevent flooding. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Storm drains in the region are collecting debris, trash and fallen foliage as crews work to keep them clear to prevent flooding. (WTOP/Kate Ryan) (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Crews are monitoring areas of the region prone to flooding, like Old Town Alexandria. (WTOP/Kristi King)
Crews are monitoring areas of the region prone to flooding, like Old Town Alexandria. (WTOP/Kristi King)
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Storm drains in the region are collecting debris, trash and fallen foliage as crews work to keep them clear to prevent flooding. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Crews are monitoring areas of the region prone to flooding, like Old Town Alexandria. (WTOP/Kristi King)

WASHINGTON — Transportation crews in D.C., Maryland and Virginia are monitoring flooding in rivers and neighborhoods. But they need residents’ help, and they’re asking that any flooding be reported.

The District’s emergency resources are on alert, and crews are monitoring the Potomac and Anacostia river levels, as well as specific neighborhoods prone to flooding.

“We’re looking at the Bloomingdale area, the Wharf, some parts of Georgetown as well,” said Christopher Rodriguez, director of the District’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

The department is also watching low-lying areas in Wards 8 and 2, he said.

“In their neighborhoods, if they do see debris piling up around storm drains and if they do see some roads that are flooded, call 311,” Rodriguez said.

Rodriguez urged drivers to be patient and turn around if they encounter water on the roadway, as numerous drivers have already found themselves stranded.

Clearing storm drains to prevent water from pooling on roadways is the main task of crews across the region, from Frederick, Maryland, to Alexandria, Virginia.

Virginia’s Department of Emergency Management is working to be aware of flooding conditions in Northern Virginia and is mitigating its effects as the rain falls.

“We’re vacuuming out the inlets that collect the water, making sure the pipes that transfer the water from the inlets into the drainage systems are clear and finally making sure that all the drainage ditches are free of debris,” Maryland State Highway spokesperson Charlie Gischlar said.

In Alexandria, the Public Works Services vacuum truck is making the rounds, cleaning inlets and checking catch basins in the storm drain system. The city expects the usual nuisance flooding that often comes with heavy rains.

In Maryland, crews are inspecting roadway drainage systems to ensure they are free of debris and vegetation growth. Residents there are asked to call 511 to report any flooding. That resource also allows motorists to learn about possibly flooded roadways and to report any changing driving situations.

WTOP’s Kristi King contributed to this report.


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