Queen Elizabeth II dead at 96 after 70 years on the throne

Britain_Queen_21251 FILE - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II waits in the Drawing Room before receiving Liz Truss for an audience at Balmoral, in Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, where Truss was invited to become Prime Minister and form a new government. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II is under medical supervision as doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” The announcement comes a day after the 96-year-old monarch canceled a meeting of her Privy Council and was told to rest.
Britain_Queen_79478 FILE - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II looks on during a visit to officially open the new building at Thames Hospice, Maidenhead, England July 15, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II is under medical supervision as doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” The announcement comes a day after the 96-year-old monarch canceled a meeting of her Privy Council and was told to rest.
Britain_Queen_89358 Barriers are moved into place at the entrance to Balmoral in Scotland, where the Queen is under medical supervision, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II has been placed under medical supervision because doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” Members of the royal family traveled to Scotland to be with the 96-year-old monarch. The announcement comes a day after the queen canceled a virtual meeting of her Privy Council when doctors advised her to rest following a full day of events on Tuesday, when she formally asked Liz Truss to become prime minister.
Britain_Queen_33746 Barriers are moved into place at the entrance to Balmoral in Scotland, where the Queen is under medical supervision, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II has been placed under medical supervision because doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” Members of the royal family traveled to Scotland to be with the 96-year-old monarch. The announcement comes a day after the queen canceled a virtual meeting of her Privy Council when doctors advised her to rest following a full day of events on Tuesday, when she formally asked Liz Truss to become prime minister.
Britain_Queen_59955 Media gather at the entrance to Balmoral in Scotland, where the Queen is under medical supervision, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II has been placed under medical supervision because doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” Members of the royal family traveled to Scotland to be with the 96-year-old monarch. The announcement comes a day after the queen canceled a virtual meeting of her Privy Council when doctors advised her to rest following a full day of events on Tuesday, when she formally asked Liz Truss to become prime minister.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_60072 FILE - In this April 1966 file photo Britain's Queen Elizabeth II is seen during the State Opening of Parliament, London, England. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_75543 FILE - In this June 20, 1959 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip are pictured in Schefferville, as they listen to an explanation on the workings of an iron ore mine on another stop in their royal tour of Canada. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_59218 People gather outside Buckingham Palace in London, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II has been placed under medical supervision because doctors are "concerned for Her Majesty's health." Members of the royal family traveled to Scotland to be with the 96-year-old monarch.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_34213 People gather in front of Buckingham Palace in London, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II has been placed under medical supervision because doctors are "concerned for Her Majesty's health." Members of the royal family traveled to Scotland to be with the 96-year-old monarch.
Britain_Queen_63535 A florist van at the gates of Balmoral in Scotland, where Britain's Queen is under medical supervision, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II has been placed under medical supervision because doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” Members of the royal family traveled to Scotland to be with the 96-year-old monarch. The announcement comes a day after the queen canceled a virtual meeting of her Privy Council when doctors advised her to rest following a full day of events on Tuesday, when she formally asked Liz Truss to become prime minister.
Britain_Queen_06595 An armed police officer stands at the gates to Balmoral in Scotland, where Britain's Queen is under medical supervision, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II has been placed under medical supervision because doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” Members of the royal family traveled to Scotland to be with the 96-year-old monarch. The announcement comes a day after the queen canceled a virtual meeting of her Privy Council when doctors advised her to rest following a full day of events on Tuesday, when she formally asked Liz Truss to become prime minister.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_28990 FILE - In this file photo dated June 5, 1961, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, centre, walks with US President John F. Kennedy, right, and his wife Jacqueline Kennedy, as they enter an ante-room in Buckingham Palace, London, before a dinner given by the Queen in honour of the visiting President and his wife. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_56566 FILE This June 15, 1960 file photo shows Queen Elizabeth II, riding out from Buckingham Palace, London to take the salute at the ceremony of Trooping the Colour, followed by Prince Philip and with him is the Duke of Gloucester, the Queen's uncle. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
APTOPIX_Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_08304
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_10701 FILE - In this Nov. 20, 1972 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, centre left and Prince Philip, centre, are seated with their children, from left, Prince Charles, Prince Edward, Prince Andrew and Princess Anne, at Buckingham Palace, in London, on the occasion of the royal couple's silver wedding anniversary. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_72372 FILE - In this Tuesday, June 26, 2018 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth, Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex pose for a group photo at the Queen's Young Leaders Awards Ceremony at Buckingham Palace in London. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_69519 FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 7, 2002 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II sheds a tear during the Field of Remembrance Service at Westminster Abbey, London.Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_98681 FILE - In this May 8, 1945 file photo Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill, center, joins the Royal family, from left, Princess Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth, King George VI, and Princess Margaret, on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, London, England, on VE-Day. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a symbol of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died on Thursday, Sept, 8, 2022. She was 96.
APTOPIX_Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_20422 FILE - In this June. 2, 1953 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh wave to supporters from the balcony at Buckingham Palace, following her coronation at Westminster Abbey, London. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_82992 FILE - In this Aug. 17, 1943 file photo, Britain's Princess Elizabeth poses for a photo in a Girl Guides uniform, in Windsor Great Park, in Windsor, England. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_62407 FILE - In this Nov. 20, 1947 file photo, Britain's Princess Elizabeth and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh wave to the crowds on their wedding day, from the balcony of Buckingham Palace in London. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_35860 FILE - In this April 9, 2020 file photo an image of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and quotes from her historic television broadcast commenting on the coronavirus pandemic are displayed on a big screen behind the Eros statue and a London underground train station entrance sign at Piccadilly Circus in London. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_13361 FILE - Queen Elizabeth II waves to the crowd during the Platinum Jubilee Pageant at the Buckingham Palace in London, Sunday, June 5, 2022, on the last of four days of celebrations to mark the Platinum Jubilee. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_Timeline_18312 FILE - A high angled view of Britain's Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, leaving Westminster Abbey, after their marriage, in London. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_Timeline_42699 FILE - Britain's Princess Elizabeth, a Junior Commander in the Auxiliary Territorial Service, receives a clock presented to her by her old associates at the camp where she received her early training, during a ceremony at the No. 1 M.T. Training Center, in Camberley, England, Aug. 3, 1945. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
Britain_Queen_Elizabeth_II_93988 FILE - Britain's Prince Charles, Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Louis, Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, Princess Charlotte, from left, stand on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, London, Thursday June 2, 2022, on the first of four days of celebrations to mark the Platinum Jubilee. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a rock of stability across much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.
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LONDON (AP) — Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-reigning monarch and a symbol of stability in a turbulent era that saw the decline of the British empire and disarray in her own family, died Thursday after 70 years on the throne. She was 96.

The palace announced she died at Balmoral Castle, her summer residence in Scotland, where members of the royal family had rushed to her side after her health took a turn for the worse.

A link to the almost-vanished generation that fought World War II, she was the only monarch most Britons have ever known.

Her 73-year-old son Prince Charles automatically became king and will be known as King Charles III, it was announced. British monarchs in the past have selected new names upon taking the throne. Charles’ second wife, Camilla, will be known as the Queen Consort.

A funeral was to be held after 10 days of official mourning.

The BBC played the national anthem, “God Save the Queen,” over a portrait of Elizabeth in full regalia as her death was announced, and the flag over Buckingham Palace was lowered to half-staff as the second Elizabethan age came to a close.

The impact of her loss will be huge and unpredictable, both for the nation and for the monarchy, an institution she helped stabilize and modernize across decades of enormous social change and family scandals, but whose relevance in the 21st century has often been called into question.

The public’s abiding affection for the queen has helped sustain support for the monarchy during the scandals. Charles is nowhere near as popular.

In a statement, Charles called his mother’s death “a moment of the greatest sadness for me and all members of my family,” adding: “I know her loss will be deeply felt throughout the country, the Realms and the Commonwealth, and by countless people around the world.”

The changing of the guard comes at a fraught moment for Britain, which has a brand-new prime minister and is grappling with an energy crisis, double-digit inflation, the war in Ukraine and the fallout from Brexit.

Prime Minister Liz Truss, appointed by the queen just 48 hours earlier, pronounced the country “devastated” and called Elizabeth “the rock on which modern Britain was built.”

British subjects outside Buckingham Palace wept when officials carried a notice confirming the queen’s death to the wrought-iron gates of the queen’s London home. Hundreds soon gathered in the rain, and mourners laid dozens of colorful bouquets at the gates.

“As a young person, this is a really huge moment,” said Romy McCarthy, 20. “It marks the end of an era, particularly as a woman. We had a woman who was in power as someone to look up to.”

World leaders extended condolences and paid tribute to the queen.

In Canada, where the British monarch is the country’s head of state, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s eyes were red with emotion as he saluted her “wisdom, compassion and warmth.” In India, once the “jewel in the crown” of the British empire, Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted: “She personified dignity and decency in public life. Pained by her demise.”

U.S. President Joe Biden called her a “stateswoman of unmatched dignity and constancy who deepened the bedrock alliance between the United Kingdom and the United States.”

Since Feb. 6, 1952, Elizabeth reigned over a Britain that rebuilt from a destructive and financially exhausting war and lost its empire; joined the European Union and then left it; and made the painful transition into the 21st century.

She endured through 15 prime ministers, from Winston Churchill to Truss, becoming an institution and an icon — a reassuring presence even for those who ignored or loathed the monarchy.

She became less visible in her final years as age and frailty curtailed many public appearances. But she remained firmly in control of the monarchy and at the center of national life as Britain celebrated her Platinum Jubilee with days of parties and pageants in June.

That same month she became the second longest-reigning monarch in history, behind 17th-century French King Louis XIV, who took the throne at age 4. On Tuesday, she presided at a ceremony at Balmoral Castle to accept the resignation of Boris Johnson as prime minister and appoint Truss as his successor.

When Elizabeth was 21, almost five years before she became queen, she promised the people of Britain and the Commonwealth that “my whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service.”

It was a promise she kept across more than seven decades.

Despite Britain’s complex and often fraught ties with its former colonies, Elizabeth was widely respected and remained head of state of more than a dozen countries, from Canada to Tuvalu. She headed the 54-nation Commonwealth, built around Britain and its former colonies.

Married for more than 73 years to Prince Philip, who died in 2021 at age 99, Elizabeth was matriarch to a royal family whose troubles were a subject of global fascination — amplified by fictionalized accounts such as the TV series “The Crown.” She is survived by four children, eight grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

Through countless public events, she probably met more people than anyone in history. Her image, which adorned stamps, coins and banknotes, was among the most reproduced in the world.

But her inner life and opinions remained mostly an enigma. Of her personality, the public saw relatively little. A horse owner, she rarely seemed happier than during the Royal Ascot racing week. She never tired of the companionship of her beloved Welsh corgi dogs.

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor was born in London on April 21, 1926, the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York. She was not born to be queen — her father’s elder brother, Prince Edward, was destined for the crown, to be followed by any children he had.

But in 1936, when she was 10, Edward VIII abdicated to marry twice-divorced American Wallis Simpson, and Elizabeth’s father became King George VI.

Princess Margaret recalled asking her sister whether this meant that Elizabeth would one day be queen. “Yes, I suppose it does,” Margaret quoted Elizabeth as saying. “She didn’t mention it again.”

Elizabeth was barely in her teens when Britain went to war with Germany in 1939. While the king and queen stayed at Buckingham Palace during the Blitz and toured the bombed-out neighborhoods of London, Elizabeth and Margaret spent most of the war at Windsor Castle, west of the capital. Even there, 300 bombs fell in an adjacent park, and the princesses spent many nights in an underground shelter.

She made her first public broadcast in 1940 when she was 14, sending a wartime message to children evacuated to the countryside or overseas.

“We children at home are full of cheerfulness and courage,” she said with a blend of stoicism and hope that would echo throughout her reign. “We are trying to do all we can to help out gallant soldiers, sailors and airmen. And we are trying, too, to bear our own share of the danger and sadness of war. We know, every one of us, that in the end all will be well.”

In 1945, after months of campaigning for her parents’ permission to do something for the war effort, the heir to the throne became Second Subaltern Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor in the Auxiliary Territorial Service. She enthusiastically learned to drive and service heavy vehicles.

On the night the war ended in Europe, May 8, 1945, she and Margaret managed to mingle, unrecognized, with celebrating crowds in London — “swept along on a tide of happiness and relief,” as she told the BBC decades later, describing it as “one of the most memorable nights of my life.”

At Westminster Abbey in November 1947 she married Royal Navy officer Philip Mountbatten, a prince of Greece and Denmark whom she had first met in 1939 when she was 13 and he 18. Postwar Britain was experiencing austerity and rationing, and so street decorations were limited and no public holiday was declared. But the bride was allowed 100 extra ration coupons for her trousseau.

The couple lived for a time in Malta, where Philip was stationed, and Elizabeth enjoyed an almost-normal life as a navy wife. The first of their four children, Prince Charles, was born in 1948. He was followed by Princess Anne in 1950, Prince Andrew in 1960, and Prince Edward in 1964.

In 1952, George VI died at 56 after years of ill health. Elizabeth, on a visit to Kenya, was told that she was now queen.

Her private secretary, Martin Charteris, later recalled finding the new monarch at her desk, “sitting erect, no tears, color up a little, fully accepting her destiny.”

“In a way, I didn’t have an apprenticeship,” Elizabeth reflected in a BBC documentary in 1992 that opened a rare view into her emotions. “My father died much too young, and so it was all a very sudden kind of taking on, and making the best job you can.”

Her coronation took place more than a year later, a grand spectacle at Westminster Abbey viewed by millions through the still-new medium of television.

Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s first reaction to the king’s death was to complain that the new queen was “only a child,” but he was won over within days and eventually became an ardent admirer.

In Britain’s constitutional monarchy, the queen is head of state but has little direct power; in her official actions she does what the government orders. However, she was not without influence. The queen, officially the head of the Church of England, once reportedly commented that there was nothing she could do legally to block the appointment of a bishop, “but I can always say that I should like more information. That is an indication that the prime minister will not miss.”

The extent of the monarch’s political influence occasionally sparked speculation — but not much criticism while Elizabeth was alive. The views of Charles, who has expressed strong opinions on everything from architecture to the environment, might prove more contentious.

She was obliged to meet weekly with the prime minister, and they generally found her well-informed, inquisitive and up to date. The one possible exception was Margaret Thatcher, with whom her relations were said to be cool, if not frosty, though neither woman ever commented.

The queen’s views in those private meetings became a subject of intense speculation and fertile ground for dramatists like Peter Morgan, author of the play “The Audience” and the hit TV series “The Crown.” Those semi-fictionalized accounts were the product of an era of declining deference and rising celebrity, when the royal family’s troubles became public property.

And there were plenty of troubles within the family, an institution known as “The Firm.” In Elizabeth’s first years on the throne, Princess Margaret provoked a national controversy through her romance with a divorced man.

In what the queen called the “annus horribilis” of 1992, her daughter, Princess Anne, was divorced, Prince Charles and Princess Diana separated, and so did her son Prince Andrew and his wife, Sarah. That was also the year Windsor Castle, a residence she far preferred to Buckingham Palace, was seriously damaged by fire.

The public split of Charles and Diana — “There were three of us in that marriage,” Diana said of her husband’s relationship with Camilla Parker Bowles — was followed by the shock of Diana’s death in a Paris car crash in 1997. For once, the queen appeared out of step with her people.

Amid unprecedented public mourning, Elizabeth’s failure to make a public show of grief appeared to many to be unfeeling. After several days, she finally made a televised address to the nation.

The dent in her popularity was brief. She was by now a sort of national grandmother, with a stern gaze and a twinkling smile.

Despite being one of the world’s wealthiest people, Elizabeth had a reputation for frugality and common sense. She turned off lights in empty rooms, and didn’t flinch from strangling pheasants.

A newspaper reporter who went undercover to work as a palace footman reinforced that down-to-earth image, capturing pictures of the royal Tupperware on the breakfast table and a rubber duck in the bath.

Her sangfroid was not dented when a young man aimed a pistol at her and fired six blanks as she rode by on a horse in 1981, nor when she discovered a disturbed intruder sitting on her bed in Buckingham Palace in 1982.

The image of the queen as an exemplar of ordinary British decency was satirized by the magazine Private Eye, which called her Brenda, apparently because it sounded working-class. Anti-monarchists dubbed her “Mrs. Windsor.” But the republican cause gained limited traction while the queen was alive.

On her Golden Jubilee in 2002, she said the country could “look back with measured pride on the history of the last 50 years.”

“It has been a pretty remarkable 50 years by any standards,” she said in a speech. “There have been ups and downs, but anyone who can remember what things were like after those six long years of war appreciates what immense changes have been achieved since then.”

A reassuring presence at home, she was also an emblem of Britain abroad — a form of soft power, consistently respected whatever the vagaries of the country’s political leaders on the world stage. It felt only fitting that she attended the opening of the 2012 London Olympics alongside another icon, James Bond. Through some movie magic, she appeared to parachute into the Olympic Stadium.

In 2015, she overtook her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria’s reign of 63 years, seven months and two days to become the longest-serving monarch in British history. She kept working into her 10th decade, though Prince Charles and his elder son, Prince William, increasingly took over the visits, ribbon-cuttings and investitures that form the bulk of royal duties.

The loss of Philip in 2021 was a heavy blow, as she poignantly sat alone at his funeral in the chapel at Windsor Castle because of coronavirus restrictions.

And the family troubles continued. Her son Prince Andrew was entangled in the sordid tale of sex offender businessman Jeffrey Epstein, an American businessman who had been a friend. Andrew denied accusations that he had sex with one of the women who said she was trafficked by Epstein.

The queen’s grandson Prince Harry walked away from Britain and his royal duties after marrying American TV actress Meghan Markle, who is biracial, in 2018. He alleged in an interview that some in the family -– but pointedly not the queen -– had been less than welcoming to his wife.

She enjoyed robust health well into her 90s, although she used a cane in an appearance after Philip’s death. Months ago, she told guests at a reception “as you can see, I can’t move.” The palace, tight-lipped about details, said the queen was experiencing “episodic mobility issues.”

She held virtual meetings with diplomats and politicians from Windsor Castle, but public appearances grew rarer.

Meanwhile, she took steps to prepare for the transition to come. In February, the queen announced that she wanted Camilla to be known as “Queen Consort” when “in the fullness of time” her son became king. It removed a question mark over the role of the woman some blamed for the breakup of Charles’ marriage to Princess Diana in the 1990s.

May brought another symbolic moment, when she asked Charles to stand in for her and read the Queen’s Speech at the State Opening of Parliament, one of the monarch’s most central constitutional duties.

Seven decades after World War II, Elizabeth was again at the center of the national mood amid the uncertainty and loss of COVID 19 — a disease she came through herself in February.

In April 2020 — with the country in lockdown and Prime Minister Boris Johnson hospitalized with the virus — she made a rare video address, urging people to stick together.

She summoned the spirit of World War II, that vital time in her life, and the nation’s, by echoing Vera Lynn’s wartime anthem “We’ll Meet Again.”

“We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return. We will be with our friends again. We will be with our families again. We will meet again,” she said.

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The late Associated Press writers Gregory Katz and Robert Barr contributed material to this report.

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Follow AP coverage of Queen Elizabeth II at https://apnews.com/hub/queen-elizabeth-ii

Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

Princess Elizabeth is seen in the Duchess’s box at the “Dick Whittington” pantomime at the Lyceum Theater, Feb. 6, 1935. Princess Elizabeth and her little sister Princess Margaret Rose went with their mother Elizabeth, the Duchess of York, to the pantomime. (AP Photo)

60,000 school children were among the spectators in Rushmore arena who welcomed the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret Rose, daughters of the King and Queen, when they arrived to join the spectators in watching the daylight rehearsal of the Aldershot tattoo. The Queen who had intended to attend could not do so owing to a slight cold. Princess Elizabeth standing to attention at the rehearsal, on June 7, 1938, in Aldershot, Hampshire, England, during the playing of the national anthem. (AP Photo)

Princess Elizabeth the eldest daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth celebrated her 13th birthday on April 21. The Princess was allowed to plan her own day, as it was her birthday, and after opening her presents in the morning, she went riding in Windsor Great Park with the King and Princess Margaret, her younger sister. She is a giving a tea party, to which the King and Queen and Queen Mary have been invited at Windsor Castle, where the court is at present. The Princess’s birthday presents included a diamond bracelet from the King and clothes, among which were silk stockings from the Queen. Princess Elizabeth after her ride in Windsor Great Park, in England, on April 21, 1939. (AP Photo)

Wearing a fur coat, and sailor type hat, Princess Elizabeth, accompanied by the Queen, unseen, visited an army training Establishment, somewhere in Southern England, on Dec. 18, 1944. (AP Photo)

Princess Elizabeth, heir presumptive to the British throne, as she attended a rally of Land Army girls in England on June 30, 1945. The Princess is the daughter of King George and Queen Elizabeth. (AP Photo)

FILE – This file photo dated July 10, 1947 shows the official photograph of Britain’s Princess Elizabeth and her fiance, Lieut. Philip Mountbatten in London. Buckingham Palace says Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II, has died aged 99. (AP Photo/File)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip wave from the balcony of London’s Buckingham Palace following their wedding at Westminster Abbey on November 20, 1947. (AP Photo/PA)

Prince Charles, front left, eight-month-old son of Princess Elizabeth of England, left, and the Duke of Edinburgh, is posed for the camera by his mother while his father looks on, July 18, 1949, Ascot, England. Photo was made on the Windlesham Moor, their summer residence. (AP Photo)

FILE – In this Aug. 1951 file photo, Princess Elizabeth stands with her husband the Duke of Edinburgh and their children Prince Charles and Princess Anne at the couple’s London residence at Clarence House. Buckingham Palace says Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II, has died aged 99. (AP Photo/Eddie Worth, file)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II steps from her plane, for the first time as sovereign, at London Airport, on Feb. 7, 1952, after cutting short her official trip to Kenya on the death of her father King George VI. (AP Photo)

The Queen Mother (right) and Princess Margaret, both veiled, arrive at Buckingham Palace, London, by car in afternoon on Feb. 11, 1952. They stopped at the palace enroute from King’s Cross station to Westminster Hall where they were to meet the coffin of the late king. (AP Photo)

FILE – In this June 18, 1952 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh travel in an open carriage at Ascot Racecourse, Ascot, England, on the second day of the Royal Ascot meeting. Buckingham Palace officials say Prince Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II, has died, it was announced on Friday, April 9, 2021. He was 99. Philip spent a month in hospital earlier this year before being released on March 16 to return to Windsor Castle. Philip, also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, married Elizabeth in 1947 and was the longest-serving consort in British history. (AP Photo/Eddie Worth, File)

The Archbishop of Canterbury, foreground, reads the Benediction to Britain’s Queen Elizabeth during the coronation ceremony in this June 2, 1953 photo. (AP Photo)

FILE – This is a June. 2, 1953 file photo of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, as they wave to supporters from the balcony at Buckingham Palace, following her coronation at Westminster Abbey. London. (AP Photo/Leslie Priest, File)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II waves to the crowd whilst travelling to a theatre in London, May 3, 1957. (AP Photo)

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip acknowledge applause with waves after a brief talk by the Queen at a press reception at the Statler Hotel in Washington on Oct. 17, 1957. (AP Photo/William J. Smith)

The automobile bearing Queen Elizabeth II turns into Pennsylvania Avenue from 12th Street on the way to the White House as crowd’s line Washington streets to see the royal monarch on Oct. 17, 1957. (AP Photo)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II stands on the grounds of Balmoral Castle, in Royal Deeside, Scotland, with U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Aug. 29, 1959. From left to right are: Prince Philip (partially hidden); Princess Anne; President Eisenhower; Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles. The two men on the right are unidentified. (AP Photo)

Prince Philip, Jacqueline Kennedy, and Queen Elizabeth II listen to President John Kennedy at Buckingham Palace in London on June 5, 1961. The Kennedys were the guests of the Queen and Prince at dinner. (AP Photo)

President Richard Nixon of the United States, right, chats with Queen Elizabeth II, watched by the President’s wife Pat, left, and British Prime Minister Edward Heath, on the terrace at Chequers, the British Premiers official country residence on Oct. 3, 1970, before lunching. The American President was in England on a flying visit as part of his European tour. (AP Photo/Henry Burroughs)

FILE – In this 1970 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, left, reacts with U.S. President Richard Nixon, at Chequers, in Buckinghamshire, England. (AP Photo, File)

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip walk down the ramp of their aircraft at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., near Washington, on Wednesday, July 7, 1976. Police were chasing a suspected robber near the gate of base as the Queen left by limousine. (AP Photo)

President Gerald Ford dances with Queen Elizabeth II at the White House, July 7, 1976, following a State Dinner in the queen’s honor. The dance after dinner was held in the State Dining Room. (AP Photo/John Duricka)

This White House file photograph, provided courtesy of the Gerald R. Ford Library, shows President Ford, right, and Queen Elizabeth dancing during the state dinner in honor of the Queen and Prince Philip at the White House, July 17, 1976 in Washington. (AP Photo/White House, Courtesy Gerald R. Ford Library, Ricardo Thomas)

President Jimmy Carter and Queen Elizabeth II of England with others on his trip to Newcastle in England, May 1977. (AP Photo)

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh travel in a carriage during celebrations for the Silver Jubilee in London on June 7, 1977. (AP Photo)

FILE – In this Oct. 17, 1980 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, smiles at her husband Prince Philip, during an audience with Pope John Paul II in his private study at the Vatican, Italy. (AP Photo/Arturo Mari, File)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II speaks to Pope John Paul II during a visit to the Vatican, on Oct. 17, 1980. (AP Photo)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, third from the right, is joined by other members of the Royal Family, on the balcony at Buckingham Palace, London, after attending the annual Trooping of the Colour, June 13, 1981. Also in attendence is Princess Margaret, third from left, Princess Diana, fourth from left, Prince Charles, fifth from right, Prince Philip, fourth from right, at rear, and Prince Andrew, right. (AP Photo/Bob Dear)

Prince Charles and his bride Diana, Princess of Wales, wave from the balcony of Buckingham Palace after their marriage July 29, 1981, at St. Paul’s Catheral. (AP Photo)

President Ronald Reagan and Queen Elizabeth II raise their glasses in a toast during a state dinner, March 3, 1983, at the M. H. de Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. (AP Photo/Ed Reinke)

Mother Teresa of Calcutta, receives the Insignia of the Honorary Order of Merit from Queen Elizabeth II at the Rashtrapati Shavar in New Delhi, Nov. 24, 1983. (AP Photo)

FILE – In a June 10, 1984 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, second left, stands with, West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, left, U.S. President Ronald Reagan, second right, and Britain’s Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher at London’s Buckingham Palace, prior to a dinner for summit leaders. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this Aug. 4, 1987 file photo, Britain’s Diana, Princess of Wales, left, and Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II smile to well-wishers outside Clarence House in London. (AP Photo/Martin Cleaver, File)

President and Mrs. Bush pose with Queen Elizabeth, Thursday, June 1, 1989 in London at Buckingham palace where the queen hosted a lunch for the first family. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

Queen Elizabeth II and President George H.W. Bush, along with Commander of Troops Col. Barrie Zais, left, review the troops after the Queen’s arrival at the White House on Tuesday, May 14, 1991 in Washington. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma)

Queen Elizabeth II is applauded by Vice President Dan Quayle and House Speaker Thomas Foley before her address to the U.S. Congress on Thursday, May 16, 1991 in Washington. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

President Bill Clinton listens as Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II speaks, during a dinner at the Guildhall in Portsmouth Saturday June, 4, 1994, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the D-Day landings in Normandy. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

FILE – In this June 2, 2003 file photo, three generations of the British Royal family: Queen Elizabeth II; her eldest son, Charles the Prince of Wales, left; and his eldest son, Prince William, pose for a photograph at Clarence House in London. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, Pool, File)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, center, and Prince Philip, left, meet Nelson Mandela, during a reception at Buckingham Palace in London, Monday, Oct. 20, 2003, to mark the centenary of the Rhodes Trust, started by the 19th century entrepreneur, Cecil John Rhodes, which provides scholarships for students around the world to study at Oxford University.  (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

U.S. President George W. Bush, left, and first lady Laura Bush, second right, stand with Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh for an official photo in the Music Room before the start of the State Banquet at Buckingham Palace in London Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2003. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

FILE – In this Wednesday, April 12, 2006 file photo, Queen Elizabeth II smiles, as she inspects the Sovereign’s Parade at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, England. (Dylan Martinez, Pool Photo via AP, File)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II attends a garden party for members of the public at Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh, to mark the occasion of her 80th birthday. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday July 5, 2006. (Danny Lawson/Rota/PA)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II arrives for the world premiere of the new James Bond film “Casino Royale” at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2006. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

First lady Laura Bush, left, Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II and President Bush wave from the balcony at the White House during the official state arrival ceremony in Washington Monday, May 7, 2007. Prince Philip is second from left. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

FILE – In this Monday, May 7, 2007 file photo, U.S President Bush and Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II arrive on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. The Queen and her husband, Prince Philip, were on an official visit to the United States. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II looks at a gift of replica of the St Pancras train station clock as she visits the station to officially open the new St Pancras International Station in London, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2007. Eurostar train services to Paris and Brussels will officially begin operating from the terminal next week. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II laughs as she shelters under an umbrella after attending the annual Christmas day morning service at Sandringham Church, Norfolk, England, Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2007. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, front, and Prince Phillip, back, are seen in a carriage as they travel from the Houses of Parliament in central London, Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2008, after the State Opening of Parliament. (AP Photo/Akira Suemori)

FILE – In this Friday Oct. 9, 2009 file photo Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip leave London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral, following a Commemoration service to mark the end of combat operations in Iraq. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, File)

In this image made available in London Wednesday Dec. 23, 2009, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II poses prior to the recording of her annual Christmas Day broadcast to the Commonwealth, in the White Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace in London, Thursday Dec. 20, 2009. (AP Photo/John Stillwell, pool)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II inspects soldiers of the Grenadier Guards before presenting their new colours, in the garden of Buckingham Palace in London, Tuesday May 11, 2010, London. (AP Photo/Anthony Devlin, pool)

Britain’s Prince Philip, right, listens as Queen Elizabeth II delivers the Queen’s speech to the House of Lords, during the State Opening of Parliament in Westminster, central London, Tuesday, May 25, 2010. (AP Photo/Leon Neal, Pool)

Britain’s Prince Harry, left, Britain’s Prince William and, front row from left, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall , Britain’s Prince Charles , Britain’s Prince Philip and Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II attend the wedding service at Westminster Abbey at the Royal Wedding in London Friday, April 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

His Royal Highness Prince William and Catherine Middleton bow to Her Royal Highness the Queen at the end of their wedding ceremony in Westminster Abbey in central London April 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Clara Molden, Pool)

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, U.S. President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama and Prince Philip in Buckingham Palace, London, ahead of a state banquet on Tuesday May 24, 2011. President Barack Obama immersed himself in the grandeur of Britain’s royal family Tuesday, as Queen Elizabeth II welcomed him to Buckingham Palace for the first day of a state visit. (AP Photo/Chris Jackson, Pool)

President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip tour the Portrait Gallery at Buckingham Palace in London, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

FILE – In this Saturday, June 13, 2015 file photo, Britain’s Prince William holds his son Prince George, with Queen Elizabeth II, right, Kate, Duchess of Cambridge and the Prince of Wales during the Trooping The Colour parade at Buckingham Palace, in London. Britain’s Queen Elizabeth celebrates her 91st birthday on Friday, April 21, 2017

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth looks on during the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, front, at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in Windsor, near London, England, Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Jonathan Brady/pool photo via AP)

FILE – In this Tuesday, June 26, 2018 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth, Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex pose for a group photo at the Queen’s Young Leaders Awards Ceremony at Buckingham Palace in London. (John Stillwell/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE – In this Saturday, June 9, 2018 file photo, members of Britain’s royal family, from left, Britain’s Princess Anne, Princess Beatrice, Prince Andrew, Camilla Duchess of Cambridge, Queen Elizabeth, Prince Charles, Meghan Duchess of Sussex, Prince Harry, Kate Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William attend the annual Trooping the Colour Ceremony in London. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)

FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II visits the new headquarters of the Royal Philatelic society in London. Britain is marking Queen Elizabeth II's 94th birthday, Tuesday, April 21, 2020, with silence, as the nation in lockdown amid the COVID-19 pandemic forgoes the usual gun salutes and ringing of bells. With thousands dead, the monarch decided that the celebratory display of military firepower would not be “appropriate.’’ Nor will there be a celebratory peal of bells from Westminster Abbey, as the church where the queen was married and crowned is currently closed. (Tolga Akmen/Pool via AP, File)
FILE – In this Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II visits the new headquarters of the Royal Philatelic society in London. (Tolga Akmen/Pool via AP, File)

FILE – In this Wednesday July 24, 2019 file photo Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II welcomes newly elected leader of the Conservative party Boris Johnson during an audience at Buckingham Palace, London, where she invited him to become Prime Minister and form a new government. (Victoria Jones/Pool via AP, File)

FILE – In this June 1, 2020 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip pose for a photo in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle, in Windsor, England, ahead of his 99th birthday on Wednesday, June 10. Buckingham Palace officials say Prince Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II, has died, it was announced on Friday, April 9, 2021. He was 99. Philip spent a month in hospital earlier this year before being released on March 16 to return to Windsor Castle. Philip, also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, married Elizabeth in 1947 and was the longest-serving consort in British history. (Steve Parsons/Pool via AP)

FILE – In this Friday, July 17, 2020 file photo, Captain Sir Thomas Moore receives his knighthood from Britain’s Queen Elizabeth, during a ceremony at Windsor Castle in Windsor, England. (Chris Jackson/Pool Photo via AP, File)

The Queen’s Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, left, places a bouquet of flowers at the grave of the Unknown Warrior on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II, during a ceremony to mark the centenary of the burial of the Unknown Warrior, in Westminster Abbey, London, Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020. (Aaron Chown/Pool Photo via AP)

FILE - In this Saturday April 17, 2021 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II follows the coffin in a car as it makes it's way past the Round Tower during the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip inside Windsor Castle in Windsor, England. Now that the Royal Family has said farewell to Prince Philip, attention will turn to Queen Elizabeth II’s 95th birthday on Wednesday, April 21 and, in coming months, the celebrations marking her 70 years on the throne. This combination of events is reminding the United Kingdom that the reign of the queen, the only monarch most of her subjects have ever known, is finite. (Leon Neal/Pool via AP, file)
FILE – In this Saturday April 17, 2021 file photo, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II follows the coffin in a car as it makes it’s way past the Round Tower during the funeral of Britain’s Prince Philip inside Windsor Castle in Windsor, England. Now that the Royal Family has said farewell to Prince Philip, attention will turn to Queen Elizabeth II’s 95th birthday on Wednesday, April 21 and, in coming months, the celebrations marking her 70 years on the throne. This combination of events is reminding the United Kingdom that the reign of the queen, the only monarch most of her subjects have ever known, is finite. (Leon Neal/Pool via AP, file)

FILE - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II waits in the Drawing Room before receiving Liz Truss for an audience at Balmoral, in Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, where Truss was invited to become Prime Minister and form a new government. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II is under medical supervision as doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” The announcement comes a day after the 96-year-old monarch canceled a meeting of her Privy Council and was told to rest.(Jane Barlow/Pool Photo via AP, File)
FILE – Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II waits in the Drawing Room before receiving Liz Truss for an audience at Balmoral, in Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, where Truss was invited to become Prime Minister and form a new government. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II is under medical supervision as doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” The announcement comes a day after the 96-year-old monarch canceled a meeting of her Privy Council and was told to rest.(Jane Barlow/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, left, welcomes Liz Truss during an audience at Balmoral, Scotland, where she invited the newly elected leader of the Conservative party to become Prime Minister and form a new government, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. (Jane Barlow/Pool Photo via AP)
Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, left, welcomes Liz Truss during an audience at Balmoral, Scotland, where she invited the newly elected leader of the Conservative party to become Prime Minister and form a new government, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. (Jane Barlow/Pool Photo via AP)

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FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II visits the new headquarters of the Royal Philatelic society in London. Britain is marking Queen Elizabeth II's 94th birthday, Tuesday, April 21, 2020, with silence, as the nation in lockdown amid the COVID-19 pandemic forgoes the usual gun salutes and ringing of bells. With thousands dead, the monarch decided that the celebratory display of military firepower would not be “appropriate.’’ Nor will there be a celebratory peal of bells from Westminster Abbey, as the church where the queen was married and crowned is currently closed. (Tolga Akmen/Pool via AP, File)
FILE - In this Saturday April 17, 2021 file photo, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II follows the coffin in a car as it makes it's way past the Round Tower during the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip inside Windsor Castle in Windsor, England. Now that the Royal Family has said farewell to Prince Philip, attention will turn to Queen Elizabeth II’s 95th birthday on Wednesday, April 21 and, in coming months, the celebrations marking her 70 years on the throne. This combination of events is reminding the United Kingdom that the reign of the queen, the only monarch most of her subjects have ever known, is finite. (Leon Neal/Pool via AP, file)
FILE - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II waits in the Drawing Room before receiving Liz Truss for an audience at Balmoral, in Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, where Truss was invited to become Prime Minister and form a new government. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth II is under medical supervision as doctors are “concerned for Her Majesty’s health.” The announcement comes a day after the 96-year-old monarch canceled a meeting of her Privy Council and was told to rest.(Jane Barlow/Pool Photo via AP, File)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, left, welcomes Liz Truss during an audience at Balmoral, Scotland, where she invited the newly elected leader of the Conservative party to become Prime Minister and form a new government, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. (Jane Barlow/Pool Photo via AP)

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