DC animal welfare agency gets new name

LaFontaine made the announcement of the new name Monday at the Oglethorpe Street facility in Northwest D.C., home to what was the Washington Animal Rescue League. 

"We will be consolidating all of our operations into two campuses," she said. 

(WTOP/Kate Ryan)
CEO for the Humane Rescue Alliance Lisa LaFontaine made the announcement of the new name Monday at the Oglethorpe Street facility in Northwest D.C., home to what was the Washington Animal Rescue League. “We will be consolidating all of our operations into two campuses,” she said. (WTOP/Kate Ryan) (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
The Alliance operates out of the Oglethorpe Street facility and the Washington Humane Society shelter at New York Avenue in Northeast. Eventually, the two campuses will include the Oglethorpe facility and a brand new shelter, LaFontaine said. 

"We will be building a new facility right across from the Navy Yard in the years to come," she said.
The alliance operates out of the Oglethorpe Street facility and the Washington Humane Society shelter at New York Avenue in Northeast. Eventually, the two campuses will include the Oglethorpe facility and a brand-new shelter, LaFontaine said. “We will be building a new facility right across from the Navy Yard in the years to come,” she said. (WTOP/Kate Ryan) (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
The Humane Rescue Alliance is thanking the community for its donations of towels, sheets and blankets that will serve as replacement bedding for animals who lost theirs in the weekend flood. (Courtesy Humane Rescue Alliance)
The merger of the two groups will result in a savings of $1 million — without cutting a single program. “As a matter of fact,” LaFontaine said, “we’re expanding our programs, but we’re able to save money just by eliminating duplication and redundancies.” Pictured, Skylar is a little impatient with all the fuss over Humane Rescue Alliance’s new name. She’d like to get back to snuggling, playing and preparing for getting adopted. (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
While officials and reporters gathered outside for the celebration of the new name for the organization, inside the shelter, a little girl and her father stopped outside of the enclosure known as "Kitty City." Nina Santos said she wasn't sure which kitten she might be taking home, but she has the collar all picked out -- she saw just the right one at her local WalMart. And she's got the name picked out: "Kitty Purry." Her dad explained they'd recently lost their 6-year-old cat, and Nina's a cat lover. 

"They're furry and cuddly!" she explained. 

(WTOP/Kate Ryan)
While officials and reporters gathered outside for the celebration of the new name for the organization, inside the shelter, a little girl and her father stopped outside of the enclosure known as “Kitty City.” Nina Santos said she wasn’t sure which kitten she might be taking home, but she has the collar all picked out — she saw just the right one at her local Wal-Mart. And she’s got the name picked out: “Kitty Purry.” Her dad explained they’d recently lost their 6-year-old cat, and Nina’s a cat lover. “They’re furry and cuddly!” she explained. (WTOP/Kate Ryan) (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Humane Rescue Alliance
D.C.’s animal welfare agency has a new name. You’ll call the Humane Rescue Alliance to adopt dogs like Kevin, who is waiting for Monday’s ceremony to end. (WTOP/Kate Ryan) (WTOP/Kate Ryan)
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LaFontaine made the announcement of the new name Monday at the Oglethorpe Street facility in Northwest D.C., home to what was the Washington Animal Rescue League. 

"We will be consolidating all of our operations into two campuses," she said. 

(WTOP/Kate Ryan)
The Alliance operates out of the Oglethorpe Street facility and the Washington Humane Society shelter at New York Avenue in Northeast. Eventually, the two campuses will include the Oglethorpe facility and a brand new shelter, LaFontaine said. 

"We will be building a new facility right across from the Navy Yard in the years to come," she said.
The Humane Rescue Alliance is thanking the community for its donations of towels, sheets and blankets that will serve as replacement bedding for animals who lost theirs in the weekend flood. (Courtesy Humane Rescue Alliance)
While officials and reporters gathered outside for the celebration of the new name for the organization, inside the shelter, a little girl and her father stopped outside of the enclosure known as "Kitty City." Nina Santos said she wasn't sure which kitten she might be taking home, but she has the collar all picked out -- she saw just the right one at her local WalMart. And she's got the name picked out: "Kitty Purry." Her dad explained they'd recently lost their 6-year-old cat, and Nina's a cat lover. 

"They're furry and cuddly!" she explained. 

(WTOP/Kate Ryan)
Humane Rescue Alliance

WASHINGTON — Who do you call when you see a stray animal, or need help training your newly adopted pup?

In D.C., from now on, you’ll call the Humane Rescue Alliance — the new name after the merger of two of Washington’s long time animal welfare agencies, the Washington Animal Rescue League and the Washington Humane Society.

CEO for the Humane Rescue Alliance Lisa LaFontaine said it’s unique because it’s the only urban animal welfare organization that houses animal control, animal protection, adoption and welfare functions in one place. LaFontaine said the two welfare groups merged in February and said each was a powerful force for helping animals.

“This year we came together to form a more powerful organization — stronger and better equipped to serve the animals and people of our community,” she said.

While the name may have changed, the mission of the Humane Rescue Alliance continues to be the same. There are enclosures to be cleaned, dogs to be exercised, cats to be fed. And all of them are looking for that special place in someone’s home: that of a lifelong companion.

Follow the newly named alliance on social media:

Twitter: @Humane_Rescue

Instagram: @HumaneRescue

Editor’s note: WARL-WHS partners with WTOP on the Pet of the Week segment.

Follow @WTOP on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

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