AP PHOTOS: Total lunar eclipse in North America, East Asia

The second and final total lunar eclipse of the year graced the skies in some parts of the world Tuesday. The next one isn’t until 2025.

WHERE IT WAS SEEN: Where skies were clear, the eclipse was visible throughout North America in the predawn hours, with prime viewing in the West, and across parts of East Asia, Australia and the rest of the Pacific after sunset.

HOW LONG IT LASTED: The total phase of the eclipse lasted about 1 1/2 hours. The whole show took about six hours from start to finish.

WHY IT HAPPENS: A total eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth and moon line up perfectly, casting Earth’s shadow on the moon. The reddish-orange color is the result of sunlight scattering off Earth’s atmosphere.

NEXT ONE: The next total lunar eclipse is in March 2025 but there will be be plenty of partial eclipses in the meantime.

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Asia News | National News | World News

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