Today in History: Oct. 9

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In 1776, a group of Spanish missionaries settled in present-day San Francisco. (iStock/Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
Hoover Dam, Lake Mead
In 1936, the first generator at Boulder (later Hoover) Dam began transmitting electricity to Los Angeles. FILE – In this April 16, 2013 file photo, the high water mark for Lake Mead is seen on Hoover Dam and its spillway near Boulder City, Nev. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File) (AP)
Pope Pius XII poses in the Vatican on Feb. 19, 1947.  (AP Photo/Noel)
In 1958, Pope Pius XII died at age 82, ending a 19-year papacy. He is seen here posting in the Vatican on Feb. 19, 1947.  He was succeeded by Pope John XXIII.  (AP Photo/Noel) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/NOEL)
Cuba's Ernesto "Che" Guevara makes an appearance on "Face the Nation" at CBS-TV studios in New York City, Dec. 13, 1964.(AP Photo)
In 1967, Marxist revolutionary guerrilla leader Che Guevara, 39, was summarily executed by the Bolivian army a day after his capture. Cuba’s Ernesto “Che” Guevara makes an appearance on “Face the Nation” at CBS-TV studios in New York City, Dec. 13, 1964.(AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Ludwik Kuczer, 87, one of the Jews saved by German industrialist Oskar Schindler, wipes a tear during a ceremony at a monument in the former Nazi camp in Plaszow, district of  Krakow, southern Poland, Sunday, March 16, 2008, to mark the 65th anniversary of the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto. In just two days in March 1943, German soldiers emptied the ghetto of its estimated 16,000 Jewish residents, shipping them to forced labor and death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)
In 1974, businessman Oskar Schindler, credited with saving about 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust, died in Frankfurt, West Germany (at his request, he was buried in Jerusalem). Ludwik Kuczer, then 87, one of the Jews saved by German industrialist Oskar Schindler, wipes a tear during a ceremony at a monument in the former Nazi camp in Plaszow, district of Krakow, southern Poland, Sunday, March 16, 2008, to mark the 65th anniversary of the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto. In just two days in March 1943, German soldiers emptied the ghetto of its estimated 16,000 Jewish residents, shipping them to forced labor and death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz) (AP/ALIK KEPLICZ)
This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling "cultures of the now infamous 'Ames' strain of Bacillus anthracis" at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn't take a position on the FBI's conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins' co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo)
In 2001, letters postmarked in Trenton, N.J., were sent to Sens. Tom Daschle and Patrick Leahy; the letters later tested positive for anthrax. This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling “cultures of the now infamous ‘Ames’ strain of Bacillus anthracis” at his lab according to the text of the message. (AP Photo) (AP)
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2009, file photo, President and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Barack Obama poses with his medal and diploma alongside Nobel committee chairman Thorbjorn Jagland at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony at City Hall in Oslo, Norway. (AP Photo/John McConnico, File)
In 2009, President Barack Obama was named the recipient of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize for what the Norwegian Nobel Committee called “his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples.” (AP Photo/John McConnico, File) (AP/John McConnico)
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Hoover Dam, Lake Mead
Pope Pius XII poses in the Vatican on Feb. 19, 1947.  (AP Photo/Noel)
Cuba's Ernesto "Che" Guevara makes an appearance on "Face the Nation" at CBS-TV studios in New York City, Dec. 13, 1964.(AP Photo)
Ludwik Kuczer, 87, one of the Jews saved by German industrialist Oskar Schindler, wipes a tear during a ceremony at a monument in the former Nazi camp in Plaszow, district of  Krakow, southern Poland, Sunday, March 16, 2008, to mark the 65th anniversary of the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto. In just two days in March 1943, German soldiers emptied the ghetto of its estimated 16,000 Jewish residents, shipping them to forced labor and death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)
This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling "cultures of the now infamous 'Ames' strain of Bacillus anthracis" at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn't take a position on the FBI's conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins' co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2009, file photo, President and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Barack Obama poses with his medal and diploma alongside Nobel committee chairman Thorbjorn Jagland at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony at City Hall in Oslo, Norway. (AP Photo/John McConnico, File)

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 9, the 282nd day of 2019. There are 83 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 9, 1967, Marxist revolutionary guerrilla leader Che Guevara, 39, was summarily executed by the Bolivian army a day after his capture.

On this date:

In 1776, a group of Spanish missionaries settled in present-day San Francisco.

In 1910, a coal dust explosion at the Starkville Mine in Colorado left 56 miners dead.

In 1914, the Belgian city of Antwerp fell to German forces during World War I.

In 1930, Laura Ingalls became the first woman to fly across the United States as she completed a nine-stop journey from Roosevelt Field, N.Y., to Glendale, Calif.

In 1936, the first generator at Boulder (later Hoover) Dam began transmitting electricity to Los Angeles.

In 1940, rock-and-roll legend John Lennon was born in Liverpool, England. (On this date in 1975, his son, Sean, was born in New York.)

In 1958, Pope Pius XII died at age 82, ending a 19-year papacy. (He was succeeded by Pope John XXIII.)

In 1974, businessman Oskar Schindler, credited with saving about 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust, died in Frankfurt, West Germany (at his request, he was buried in Jerusalem).

In 1985, the hijackers of the Achille Lauro (ah-KEE’-leh LOW’-roh) cruise liner surrendered two days after seizing the vessel in the Mediterranean. (Passenger Leon Klinghoffer was killed by the hijackers during the standoff.)

In 2001, in the first daylight raids since the start of U.S.-led attacks on Afghanistan, jets bombed the Taliban stronghold of Kandahar. Letters postmarked in Trenton, N.J., were sent to Sens. Tom Daschle and Patrick Leahy; the letters later tested positive for anthrax.

In 2006, North Korea faced a barrage of condemnation and calls for retaliation after it announced that it had set off a small atomic weapon underground; President Bush said, “The international community will respond.” Google Inc. announced it was snapping up YouTube Inc. for $1.65 billion in a stock deal.

In 2012, former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison following his conviction on 45 counts of sexual abuse of boys.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama won the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize for what the Norwegian Nobel Committee called “his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples.”

Five years ago: Six U.S. military planes arrived in the Ebola hot zone with more Marines as West African leaders pleaded for the world’s help in dealing with what Sierra Leone President Ernest Bai Koroma described as “a tragedy unforeseen in modern times.” French novelist Patrick Modiano was named the recipient of the Nobel Prize in literature. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Carolyn Kizer, 89, died in Sonoma, California.

One year ago: President Donald Trump and U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley announced that Haley would be leaving the administration at the end of the year; no reason was given for her departure. Brett Kavanaugh took the bench for the first time as a Supreme Court justice in a jovial atmosphere that was at odds with the rancor that surrounded his confirmation. After starting the week with a rare political post on social media. Taylor Swift captured four honors at the American Music Awards to become the most decorated woman in the show’s history. Police at the Orlando, Florida airport removed a passenger who refused to get off a flight to Cleveland after she was found carrying a squirrel she had described as an emotional support animal.

Copyright © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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