Today in History: June 2

On this date in 1893, Frances Cleveland, wife of President Grover Cleveland, gave birth to a daughter, Esther, in the White House; it was the first (and, to date, only) time a president's child was born in the executive mansion. (AP Photo)

In 1886, President Grover Cleveland, 49, married Frances Folsom, 21, in the Blue Room of the White House. (To date, Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive mansion.) (AP Photo)

Lou Gehrig, New York Yankees first baseman who had played in 2,130 consecutive games, took to the bench May 2, 1939 at his own request and looked on forlornly as his teammates warmed up for their game with the Tigers in Detroit.  "I felt I wasn't helping the club by the way I was playing," Gehrig explained.  The Yankees thrashed the Tigers 22 to 2.  (AP Photo)
In 1941, baseball’s “Iron Horse,” Lou Gehrig, died in New York of a degenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; he was 37. (AP Photo)

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, gather with other members of the British royal family to greet supporters from the balcony at Buckingham Palace, following her coronation at Westminster Abbey. London, June. 2, 1953. (AP Photo/Priest)

In 1953, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II took place in London’s Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the death of her father, King George VI. (AP Photo/Priest)

City and federal investigators examined a car damaged on Wednesday, June 3, 1976 in Phoenix, Ariz., in a bomb explosion which critically injured Arizona Republican investigative reporter Don Bolles, 47. (AP Photo)

In 1976, Arizona Republic investigative reporter Don Bolles was mortally injured by a bomb planted underneath his car; he died 11 days later. (Prosecutors believed Bolles was targeted because he had written stories that upset a liquor wholesaler; three men were convicted of the killing.) (AP Photo)

An Air Canada DC-9 smolders at the end of a runway at Greater Cincinnati Airport in Cincinnati on June 2, 1983. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

In 1983, half of the 46 people aboard an Air Canada DC-9 were killed after fire broke out on board, forcing the jetliner to make an emergency landing at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

Senate Majority Leader Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas watches Sen. Charles McC. Mathias Jr. on television during a Senate floor debate, from his office on Capitol Hill, Washington, Monday, June 2, 1986. The Senate launched a six-week experiment of making its floor sessions available for live broadcast by television networks. (AP Photo/Lana Harris)

In 1986, for the first time, the public could watch the proceedings of the U.S. Senate on television as a six-week experiment began.

In this photo, Senate Majority Leader Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas watches a Senate floor debate from his office on Capitol Hill. (AP Photo/Lana Harris)

MCVEIGH

In 1997, Timothy McVeigh was convicted of murder and conspiracy in the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. (McVeigh was executed in June 2001.)

In this 1995 file photo, McVeigh is lead out of the Noble County Courthouse by state and federal law enforcement officials in Perry, Oklahoma. (AP Photo/John Gaps III)

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On this date in 1893, Frances Cleveland, wife of President Grover Cleveland, gave birth to a daughter, Esther, in the White House; it was the first (and, to date, only) time a president's child was born in the executive mansion. (AP Photo)
Lou Gehrig, New York Yankees first baseman who had played in 2,130 consecutive games, took to the bench May 2, 1939 at his own request and looked on forlornly as his teammates warmed up for their game with the Tigers in Detroit.  "I felt I wasn't helping the club by the way I was playing," Gehrig explained.  The Yankees thrashed the Tigers 22 to 2.  (AP Photo)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, gather with other members of the British royal family to greet supporters from the balcony at Buckingham Palace, following her coronation at Westminster Abbey. London, June. 2, 1953. (AP Photo/Priest)
City and federal investigators examined a car damaged on Wednesday, June 3, 1976 in Phoenix, Ariz., in a bomb explosion which critically injured Arizona Republican investigative reporter Don Bolles, 47. (AP Photo)
An Air Canada DC-9 smolders at the end of a runway at Greater Cincinnati Airport in Cincinnati on June 2, 1983. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Senate Majority Leader Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas watches Sen. Charles McC. Mathias Jr. on television during a Senate floor debate, from his office on Capitol Hill, Washington, Monday, June 2, 1986. The Senate launched a six-week experiment of making its floor sessions available for live broadcast by television networks. (AP Photo/Lana Harris)
MCVEIGH

Today is Sunday, June 2, the 153rd day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 2, 1979, Pope John Paul II arrived in his native Poland on the first visit by a pope to a Communist country.

On this date:

In 1886, President Grover Cleveland, 49, married Frances Folsom, 21, in the Blue Room of the White House. (To date, Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive mansion.)

In 1897, Mark Twain was quoted by the New York Journal as saying from London that “the report of my death was an exaggeration.” (Twain was responding to a report in the New York Herald that he was “grievously ill” and “possibly dying.”)

In 1924, Congress passed, and President Calvin Coolidge signed, a measure guaranteeing full American citizenship for all Native Americans born within U.S. territorial limits.

In 1941, baseball’s “Iron Horse,” Lou Gehrig, died in New York of a degenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; he was 37.

In 1953, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II took place in London’s Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the death of her father, King George VI.

In 1961, playwright and director George S. Kaufman, 71, died in New York.

In 1966, U.S. space probe Surveyor 1 landed on the moon and began transmitting detailed photographs of the lunar surface.

In 1976, Arizona Republic investigative reporter Don Bolles (bohlz) was mortally wounded by a bomb planted underneath his car; he died 11 days later. (Prosecutors believed Bolles was targeted because he had written stories that upset a liquor wholesaler; three men were convicted of the killing.)

In 1983, half of the 46 people aboard an Air Canada DC-9 were killed after fire broke out on board, forcing the jetliner to make an emergency landing at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

In 1986, for the first time, the public could watch the proceedings of the U.S. Senate on television as a six-week experiment began.

In 1997, Timothy McVeigh was convicted of murder and conspiracy in the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City that killed 168 people. (McVeigh was executed in June 2001.)

In 2004, the syndicated TV game show “Jeopardy!” began airing contestant Ken Jennings’ 74-game winning streak.

Ten years ago: Scott Roeder, an anti-abortion activist, was charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of late-term abortion provider Dr. George Tiller in Wichita, Kansas. (Roeder was later convicted and sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole for 50 years.) Chicago police officer Anthony Abbate (ah-BAHT’-ee) was convicted of committing aggravated battery against Karolina Obrycka (ob-RY’-kah), a bartender half his size, after she’d refused to serve him more drinks; Abbate received probation.

Five years ago: Spain’s King Juan Carlos, who’d led the transition from dictatorship to democracy but faced damaging scandals amid a financial meltdown, announced he would abdicate in favor of his more popular son Felipe.

One year ago: Bare-knuckle boxing matches took place in front of 2,000 rowdy fans at a hockey rink in Cheyenne, Wyoming; the event, promoted as the first legal, regulated and sanctioned bare-knuckle fight event in U.S. history, featured 10 bouts and was viewed by tens of thousands via pay-per-view.

Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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