Stormy and steamy end to workweek in DC area

The hot streak of weather for the D.C. region continued on Friday with dangerous heat levels, capped off with some storms that were severe in some parts of the area.

The National Weather Service issued severe thunderstorm warnings as scattered strong to severe thunderstorms formed and drifted into the WTOP listening area just as the rush hour got going.

A severe thunderstorm watch for the listening area ended at 8 p.m.

The heat advisory for Friday was in effect until 7 p.m. for most of the region. The heat index ranged from 105 to 110 degrees during its peak in the afternoon into the early evening hours.

The cold front will bring more showers and storms with potential heavy rain on Saturday into Saturday night, but because of the clouds and the numerous showers, it will stay out of the 90s, so the heat wave will be over.

Northwesterly winds will start to dry us out on Sunday, bringing in not only more seasonable temperatures, but also much more comfortable levels of humidity.



Friday’s hot weather capped off a week of high temperatures and humidity. While Thursday was the second day in a row heat indexes topped out between 105 and 110 along the Interstate 95 corridor, it is still not the new record.

The last time Reagan National Airport reached 100 was Aug. 15, 2016; D.C.’s average high temperature for this time of year is around 90. Dulles International Airport set a new daily record high of 99 on Thursday, breaking its old record of 97 for Aug. 11 in 2010.


Forecast:

Friday night: Showers and thunderstorms. Lows in the 70s.

Saturday: Partly sunny and hot with lowering humidity. Rain and thunder likely with the threat of strong to severe storms. Highs in the upper 80s.

Sunday: Partly to mostly cloudy, cooler and less humid. Highs in the low to mid-80s.

Monday: Partly sunny, with a chance for some showers mainly south of Washington. Highs in the upper 70s to lower 80s.


Current conditions:


Outages:

WTOP’s Abigail Constantino contributed to this report. 

Jose Umana

José Umaña is a digital editor for WTOP. He’s been working as a journalist for almost a decade, covering local news, education and sports. His work has appeared in The Prince George’s Sentinel, The Montgomery Sentinel, Orlando Sentinel, PressBox and The Diamondback.

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Micaela Montelara plays as Korey Bissonnette runs with his son Max Bissonnette in the fountain at Georgetown Waterfront Park during a heatwave on August 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. – July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on August 13, 2021. The combined land- and ocean-surface temperature around the world, according to NOAA, was 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit (0.93°C) above the 20th century average of 60.4F (15.7°C) since record-keeping started 142 years ago. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

A woman walks with an umbrella at the U.S. Capitol building where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a third day in a row on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East have been generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A man walks with an umbrella at the U.S. Capitol building where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a third day in a row on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East have been generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Korey Bissonnette plays with his son Max Bissonnette in the fountain at Georgetown Waterfront Park during a heatwave on August 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. – July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on August 13, 2021. The combined land- and ocean-surface temperature around the world, according to NOAA, was 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit (0.93°C) above the 20th century average of 60.4F (15.7°C) since record-keeping started 142 years ago. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

People rest in the sunlight on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol building where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a third day in a row on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East have been generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Micaela Montelara plays in the fountain at Georgetown Waterfront Park during a heatwave on August 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. – July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released, by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on August 13, 2021. The combined land- and ocean-surface temperature around the world, according to NOAA, was 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit (0.93°C) above the 20th century average of 60.4F (15.7°C) since record-keeping started 142 years ago. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

People exercise on the National Mall as temperatures are expected to reach near 100 degrees Fahrenheit on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The DC metropolitan region is under a heat advisory as a third day of extreme heat and humidity hits the nation’s capital. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

People watch the sunrise from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial as temperatures are expected to reach near 100 degrees Fahrenheit on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The DC metropolitan region is under a heat advisory as a third day of extreme heat and humidity hits the nation’s capital. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A person cools off in the fountain at the World War II Memorial as temperatures are expected to reach near 100 degrees Fahrenheit on August 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The DC metropolitan region is under a heat advisory as a third day of extreme heat and humidity hits the nation’s capital. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

Kids cool down in a waterfall at Yards Park in Washington, D.C., Aug. 12, 2021, as an extreme heat wave hits the region. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP)

Kids cool down in the water at Yards Park in Washington, D.C., Aug. 12, 2021, as an extreme heat wave hits the region. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP)

A person rides their bike through a fountain as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. A recently released climate report from the United Nations predicts that the world will continue to warm with devastating heat waves, floods and fires becoming more frequent. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A woman puts her feet in the water at the National World War II Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., Aug. 12, 2021, as a heat wave continues in the area, with the National Weather Service issuing a heat advisory for extreme temperatures and high humidity. (Photo by Olivier DOULIERY / AFP)

People walk along the National Mall as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. A recently released climate report from the United Nations predicts that the world will continue to warm with devastating heat waves, floods and fires becoming more frequent. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A child cools off in a fountain as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. A recently released climate report from the United Nations predicts that the world will continue to warm with devastating heat waves, floods and fires becoming more frequent. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A person sunbaths on the National Mall as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

A man escapes the heat while sitting in the shadow cast by the Washington Monument on the National Mall where temperatures neared 100 degrees across the region for a second day in a row on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Heat domes in Pacific Northwest and the East are generating a wide expanse of abnormally high temperatures that have put 150 million Americans under alert. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

With the U.S. Capitol in the background, tourists walk in the shadow cast by the Washington Monument on the National Mall where temperatures neared 100-degrees across the region for a second day in a row on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

People cool off in the shade on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

People walk toward the Washington Monument on the National Mall where temperatures neared 100 degrees across the region for a second day in a row on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A person relaxes in the shade of a tree on the the National Mall as temperatures reached 97 degrees on Aug. 12, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

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