Gun control advocates march to NRA’s DC lobbying office (Photos)

Civil rights groups and labor unions are among those to march from Folger Park to the National Rifle Association lobbying offices on 1st Street near D Street Southeast on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Civil rights groups and labor unions are among those to march from Folger Park to the National Rifle Association lobbying offices on 1st Street near D Street Southeast on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

Gays Against Guns, a group formed following Orlando's Pulse nightclub attack, participate in a rally and march for gun control in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Gays Against Guns, a group formed following Orlando’s Pulse nightclub attack, participate in a rally and march for gun control in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

New York City resident John Grauwiler of New York City, a member of Gays Against Guns, says the group participated in a march in Washington, D.C. "to identify the chain of death that is the NRA, gun lobbyists, politicians held by the NRA and gun manufacturers.” (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Gays Against Guns member John Grauwiler says the group participated in a march in Washington, D.C. “to identify the chain of death that is the NRA, gun lobbyists, politicians held by the NRA and gun manufacturers.” (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

Sharon Devine is a member of the Gray Panthers who drove all night from Southfield, Michigan to attend a rally for gun control in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. "I'm so opposed to people being able to get high-powered weapons that are meant for war,” Devine says. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Sharon Devine is a member of the Gray Panthers who drove all night from Southfield, Michigan to attend a rally for gun control in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. “I’m so opposed to people being able to get high-powered weapons that are meant for war,” Devine says. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

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Civil rights groups and labor unions are among those to march from Folger Park to the National Rifle Association lobbying offices on 1st Street near D Street Southeast on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Gays Against Guns, a group formed following Orlando's Pulse nightclub attack, participate in a rally and march for gun control in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
New York City resident John Grauwiler of New York City, a member of Gays Against Guns, says the group participated in a march in Washington, D.C. "to identify the chain of death that is the NRA, gun lobbyists, politicians held by the NRA and gun manufacturers.” (WTOP/Dick Uliano)
Sharon Devine is a member of the Gray Panthers who drove all night from Southfield, Michigan to attend a rally for gun control in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. "I'm so opposed to people being able to get high-powered weapons that are meant for war,” Devine says. (WTOP/Dick Uliano)

WASHINGTON— Demonstrators from civil rights groups and labor unions were among those who marched on Capitol Hill on Saturday to protest the influence of the National Rifle Association and to call for gun control legislation.

The National Action Network joined hands with the American Federation of Teachers, American Federation of Teachers and other groups marching from Folger Park to NRA’s lobbying offices on 1st Street near D Street Southeast.

“I’m so opposed to people being able to get high-powered weapons that are meant for war,” said Sharon Devine, a member of the Gray Panthers who drove all night from Southfield, Michigan to attend the rally.

Demonstrators said they wanted Congress to approve legislation for universal background checks for gun buyers and to restrict the sale of high-capacity firearm magazines.

Gays Against Guns, a group formed following Orlando’s Pulse nightclub attack in June, said it was participating in the march “to identify the chain of death that is the NRA, gun lobbyists, politicians held by the NRA and gun manufacturers,” said John Grauwiler of New York City, a member of the group also known as GAG.

The demonstrators said they planned to keep pressure on Congress and to conduct more rallies, sit-ins and moments of civil disobedience in the months ahead.

Dick Uliano

Whether anchoring the news inside the Glass-Enclosed Nerve Center or reporting from the scene in Maryland, Virginia or the District, Dick Uliano is always looking for the stories that really impact people's lives.

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