High above Southwest DC, a 2nd eaglet is coming out of its shell

"ECC4" hatches in Liberty and Justice's nest above the Metropolitan Police Department Training Academy. (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps)
“ECC4” hatches in Liberty and Justice’s nest above the Metropolitan Police Department Training Academy. (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps) (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps)
On Saturday, an eaglet — tentatively named “ECC3” — was welcomed into the world by Liberty, Justice and webcam viewers. That egg was laid Feb. 7. The hatching one was laid Feb. 11. (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps) (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps)
"ECC4" hatches in Liberty and Justice's nest above the Metropolitan Police Department Training Academy. (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps)
“ECC4” hatches in Liberty and Justice’s nest above the Metropolitan Police Department Training Academy. (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps) (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps)
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"ECC4" hatches in Liberty and Justice's nest above the Metropolitan Police Department Training Academy. (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps)
"ECC4" hatches in Liberty and Justice's nest above the Metropolitan Police Department Training Academy. (Courtesy Earth Conservation Corps)

WASHINGTON — Liberty and Justice are proud mama and papa eagles (respectively) yet again with a second eaglet hatching in their Southwest D.C. roost.

A “pip” — which means the baby is pecking its way out of its shell —was detected early Sunday morning in their nest, located 110 feet above the Metropolitan Police Department Training Academy. It can take up to 48 hours to break through the shell. (You can follow the hatching live at www.eaglecam.org.)

The tiny tot will get the tentative name of “ECC4” once it comes out of its shell.

On Saturday, an eaglet — tentatively named “ECC3” — was welcomed into the world by Liberty, Justice and webcam viewers. That egg was laid Feb. 7. This one was laid Feb. 11.

Since 2004, the pair have had 1–2 eggs every year.

The Earth Conservation Corps is letting students help give the eaglets proper names. Teachers can contact the corps’ Tommy Lawrence for more information. The top 20 suggestions will be selected, then the public will vote on them.

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