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  • How to save your food in a power outage

    A power outage can be expensive depending on how much perishable food
    you have to lose.

  • Don’t buy that fresh Thanksgiving turkey just yet

    Many shoppers buy their Thanksgiving turkey frozen, but more and more people prefer a fresh one. If that includes you, be careful not to buy that bird too soon – one to two days before you plan on cooking it is the maximum, according to the USDA.

  • Dr. Pawz: Closing loophole with online pet sales

    After years of pressure from the public and animal-welfare groups, the USDA\’s inspector general looked into the laws regulating commercial dog breeding and agreed there was a gap between breeders who sell online and those who do not.

  • Money doesn’t grow on trees: Small farmers turn to organic alternatives

    Organic food products are traditionally more expensive for consumers than their conventional varieties. This difference in price is also felt by the farmers who grow and produce certified organic food. But a new program is helping small farmers grow certified natural food.

  • What is the future of food?

    It\’s something that\’s enjoyed for taste and it\’s something that\’s
    required to survive. It\’s found in the ground, on trees, on shelves, in homes and
    in retail settings throughout the world. It defines cultures, helps to run vehicles and even influences national security decisions. It\’s food, and its
    future is up for discussion.

  • Grocery costs rise 35 pct to 39 pct in decade

    Shoppers are paying between 35 percent to 39 percent more for
    groceries than they did a decade ago.

  • Beef, chicken prices to rise if gov’t furloughs meat inspectors

    Department of Agriculture inspectors could be
    furloughed for up to 15 days under
    sequestration. That would force meatpacking
    plants to intermittently shut down and would
    result in less meat in grocery stores. Prices
    would rise.

  • USDA bans deep fryers in employee cafeterias

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is cutting
    down on fried foods with a new plan to eliminate
    deep fryers from the federal department\’s
    cafeterias.

  • Cost of raising a child adds up

    A middle-income family can expect to pay $234,000
    to raise a kid born last year to the age of 18,
    according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

  • Parenting costs big bucks

    The USDA has released new data that show a baby born in 2010 will cost about $287,000 to raise.