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David Coombs, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, arrives at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoJose Luis Magana)
David Coombs, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, arrives at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
A supporter of U.S. army Pfc Bradley Manning protests outside the U.S. Embassy in London, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. A U.S. military judge sitting at Fort Meade, Md, USA, sentenced Manning Wednesday to 35-years in prison for his role in leaking classified military and diplomatic materials to the website WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoSang Tan)
A supporter of U.S. army Pfc Bradley Manning protests outside the U.S. Embassy in London, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. A U.S. military judge sitting at Fort Meade, Md, USA, sentenced Manning Wednesday to 35-years in prison for his role in leaking classified military and diplomatic materials to the website WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
Supporters of U.S. army Pfc Bradley Manning protest outside the U.S. Embassy in London, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. A U.S. military judge sitting at Fort Meade, Md, USA, sentenced Manning Wednesday to 35-years in prison for his role in leaking classified military and diplomatic materials to the website WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoSang Tan)
Supporters of U.S. army Pfc Bradley Manning protest outside the U.S. Embassy in London, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. A U.S. military judge sitting at Fort Meade, Md, USA, sentenced Manning Wednesday to 35-years in prison for his role in leaking classified military and diplomatic materials to the website WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
Manning supporter Ching Fong, front, listens as Manning defense attorney David Coombs speaks at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of classified military and diplomatic documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Manning supporter Ching Fong, front, listens as Manning defense attorney David Coombs speaks at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of classified military and diplomatic documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
David Coombs, right, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, speaks at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoJose Luis Magana)
David Coombs, right, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, speaks at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
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David Coombs, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, shake hands with supporters as he arrives at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoJose Luis Magana)
David Coombs, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, shake hands with supporters as he arrives at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
David Coombs, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, speaks at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoJose Luis Magana)
David Coombs, defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, speaks at a news conference in Hanover, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
In this courtroom sketch, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, second from right, is escorted out of a courtroom after receiving a sentence of 35 years in prison for leaking classified materials to WikiLeaks in a hearing in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. (AP PhotoWilliam Hennessy) NO TV, NO ARCHIVE, NO SALES, LOCALS OUT
In this courtroom sketch, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, second from right, is escorted out of a courtroom after receiving a sentence of 35 years in prison for leaking classified materials to WikiLeaks in a hearing in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/William Hennessy) NO TV, NO ARCHIVE, NO SALES, LOCALS OUT
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning steps into a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after receiving a 35-year sentence for giving reams of classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning steps into a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, after receiving a 35-year sentence for giving reams of classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Army, Pfc. Bradley Manning poses for a photo wearing a wig and lipstick. Manning emailed his military therapist the photo with a letter titled, My problem, in which he described his issues with gender identity and his hope that a military career would get rid of it. On Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking a trove of classified information to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoU.S. Army, File)
FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Army, Pfc. Bradley Manning poses for a photo wearing a wig and lipstick. Manning emailed his military therapist the photo with a letter titled, "My problem," in which he described his issues with gender identity and his hope that a military career would "get rid of it." On Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking a trove of classified information to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/U.S. Army, File)
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In this undated photograph provided by the U.S. Army is a cell at Fort Leavenworth, a military prison in Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, sentenced Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013, to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of secret military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks, could be headed for hard time at Fort Leavenworth, home to the American militarys most famous prison. (AP PhotoU.S. Army)
In this undated photograph provided by the U.S. Army is a cell at Fort Leavenworth, a military prison in Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, sentenced Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013, to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of secret military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks, could be headed for hard time at Fort Leavenworth, home to the American military’s most famous prison. (AP Photo/U.S. Army)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning wears handcuffs as he is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, before a sentencing hearing in his court martial. Manning was sentenced Wednesday to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of secret military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning wears handcuffs as he is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, before a sentencing hearing in his court martial. Manning was sentenced Wednesday to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of secret military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
A supporter of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning holds a sign as they protest outside of the gates at Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, before a sentencing hearing of Mannings court martial for giving reams of classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoJose Luis Magana)
A supporter of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning holds a sign as they protest outside of the gates at Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, before a sentencing hearing of Manning's court martial for giving reams of classified information to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
File - In this Aug. 3, 2009, file photograph is Fort Leavenworth, right, a military prison in Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, sentenced Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013, to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of secret military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks, could be headed for hard time at Fort Leavenworth, home to the American militarys most famous prison. (AP PhotoCharlie Riedel, File)
File - In this Aug. 3, 2009, file photograph is Fort Leavenworth, right, a military prison in Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, sentenced Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013, to 35 years in prison for giving hundreds of thousands of secret military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks, could be headed for hard time at Fort Leavenworth, home to the American military’s most famous prison. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
FILE - In this June 15, 2013 file photo, a Trade Union protester opposed to the upcoming G8 summit, wears a symbolic anti-establishment mask and holds a poster calling for freedom of U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, at a rally outside Belfast City Hall, Northern Ireland. On Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking a trove of classified information to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoPeter Morrison, File)
FILE - In this June 15, 2013 file photo, a Trade Union protester opposed to the upcoming G8 summit, wears a symbolic anti-establishment mask and holds a poster calling for freedom of U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, at a rally outside Belfast City Hall, Northern Ireland. On Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking a trove of classified information to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison, File)
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Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted from a security vehicle into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. A prosecutor recommended in closing arguments Monday that Manning should spend 60 years in prison for giving classified material to WikiLeaks. A U.S. military judge was set to deliberate the sentence of soldier Bradley Manning on Tuesday for the largest leak of classified information in the countrys history. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted from a security vehicle into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. A prosecutor recommended in closing arguments Monday that Manning should spend 60 years in prison for giving classified material to WikiLeaks. A U.S. military judge was set to deliberate the sentence of soldier Bradley Manning on Tuesday for the largest leak of classified information in the country's history. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, center, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. A prosecutor recommended in closing arguments Monday that Manning should spend 60 years in prison for giving classified material to WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, center, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. A prosecutor recommended in closing arguments Monday that Manning should spend 60 years in prison for giving classified material to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. A prosecutor recommended in closing arguments Monday that Manning should spend 60 years in prison for giving classified material to WikiLeaks. A U.S. military judge was set to deliberate the sentence of Manning on Tuesday for the largest leak of classified information in the countrys history. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. A prosecutor recommended in closing arguments Monday that Manning should spend 60 years in prison for giving classified material to WikiLeaks. A U.S. military judge was set to deliberate the sentence of Manning on Tuesday for the largest leak of classified information in the country's history. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
U.S. anti-war activist, Norman Solomon, unseen, arrives at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway Monday Aug. 12, 2013 to deliver two boxes of over 100,000 signatures calling for awarding the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize to US Army whistleblower Bradley Manning. Manning faces up to 90 years in prison for handing 700,000 classified documents to the anti-secrecy website, Wikileaks, as well as video footage of a 2007 US helicopter attack that killed civilians in Iraq, including a Reuters news photographer and his driver. (AP Photo Cornelius Poppe NTB scanpix)
U.S. anti-war activist, Norman Solomon, unseen, arrives at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway Monday Aug. 12, 2013 to deliver two boxes of over 100,000 signatures calling for awarding the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize to US Army whistleblower Bradley Manning. Manning faces up to 90 years in prison for handing 700,000 classified documents to the anti-secrecy website, Wikileaks, as well as video footage of a 2007 US helicopter attack that killed civilians in Iraq, including a Reuters news photographer and his driver. (AP Photo Cornelius Poppe /NTB scanpix)
Supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning demonstrate in front of the White House during a nighttime rally in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP PhotoPablo Martinez Monsivais)
Supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning demonstrate in front of the White House during a nighttime rally in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning demonstrate infront of the White House during a night time rally in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP PhotoPablo Martinez Monsivais)
Supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning demonstrate infront of the White House during a night time rally in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning demonstrate infront of the White House during a night time rally in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP PhotoPablo Martinez Monsivais)
Supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning demonstrate infront of the White House during a night time rally in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
A supporter, wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is seen in front of the White House during a night time demonstrate in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP PhotoPablo Martinez Monsivais)
A supporter, wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is seen in front of the White House during a night time demonstrate in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
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A supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning carries a sign while on a bicycle during a night time demonstration in front of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP PhotoPablo Martinez Monsivais)
A supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning carries a sign while on a bicycle during a night time demonstration in front of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
A supporter of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, participates in a demonstration in front of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP PhotoPablo Martinez Monsivais)
A supporter of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, participates in a demonstration in front of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning show signs outside the White House on Tuesday, July 30. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning show signs outside the White House on Tuesday, July 30. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
A message placed on mesh netting in support of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is shown outside the White House. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
A message placed on mesh netting in support of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is shown outside the White House. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
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Supporters stand outside the White House with a variety of signs showing support for U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
Supporters stand outside the White House with a variety of signs showing support for U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning carry signs, some wearing masks, as they walk to the White House. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning carry signs, some wearing masks, as they walk to the White House. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning march to the White House Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning march to the White House Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
A sign calling Bradley Manning a hero is projected onto a building. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
A sign calling Bradley Manning a hero is projected onto a building. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
Free Bradley Manning is projected onto a building near 19th and Q Street NW. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
"Free Bradley Manning" is projected onto a building near 19th and Q Street NW. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
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A life-sized puppet of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, with movable arms, is carried as the group moves toward the White House. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
A life-sized "puppet" of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, with movable arms, is carried as the group moves toward the White House. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
Some supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning made signs that light up. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
Some supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning made signs that light up. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
A screening of a video leaked by U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning to WikiLeaks gets attention in Dupont Circle. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
A screening of a video leaked by U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning to WikiLeaks gets attention in Dupont Circle. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
A sticker shows support for U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
A sticker shows support for U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, who has acknowledged giving classified information to WikiLeaks, prepare to march to the White House from Dupont Circle on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, who has acknowledged giving classified information to WikiLeaks, prepare to march to the White House from Dupont Circle on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
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Protesters put the finishing touches on signs as they get ready to march to the White House from Dupont Circle on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (WTOPMichelle Basch)
Protesters put the finishing touches on signs as they get ready to march to the White House from Dupont Circle on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (WTOP/Michelle Basch)
An armed Army Military Police officer carries an automatic rifle out of the courthouse at Fort Mead, Md, where Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is being court martialed, Thursday, July 25, 2013. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP PhotoCliff Owen)
An armed Army Military Police officer carries an automatic rifle out of the courthouse at Fort Mead, Md, where Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is being court martialed, Thursday, July 25, 2013. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
David Coombs, attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, and his wife, Tanya Monestier, walk to a courthouse at Fort Meade, Md., Friday, July 26, 2013. Coombs will present his closing argument Friday in the court-martial of Manning, who is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP PhotoCliff Owen)
David Coombs, attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, and his wife, Tanya Monestier, walk to a courthouse at Fort Meade, Md., Friday, July 26, 2013. Coombs will present his closing argument Friday in the court-martial of Manning, who is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
In this June 17, 2013 photo, Clark Stoeckley poses with a box truck in Fort Meade, Md., that he painted in support of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. Stoeckley a supporter of Pfc. Manning has been accused of posting threatening messages on the Internet and a judge has banned him from the courtroom for the rest of the soldiers trial. Manning is being tried by Judge Denise Lind, an Army colonel, on charges he leaked hundreds of thousands of government documents to the anti-secrecy site WikiLeaks. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky, File)
In this June 17, 2013 photo, Clark Stoeckley poses with a box truck in Fort Meade, Md., that he painted in support of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning. Stoeckley a supporter of Pfc. Manning has been accused of posting threatening messages on the Internet and a judge has banned him from the courtroom for the rest of the soldier's trial. Manning is being tried by Judge Denise Lind, an Army colonel, on charges he leaked hundreds of thousands of government documents to the anti-secrecy site WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
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Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, rally outside Fort Lesley J. McNair, in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013. Mannings fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP PhotoManuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, rally outside Fort Lesley J. McNair, in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013. Manning's fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier: a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, are prevented by base police from entering Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013, as protestors block the gate. Mannings fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP PhotoManuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, are prevented by base police from entering Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013, as protestors block the gate. Manning's fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier: a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, are prevented by base police from entering Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013, as protestors block the gate. Mannings fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP PhotoManuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, are prevented by base police from entering Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013, as protestors block the gate. Manning's fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier: a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Heike Schotten, of Cambridge, Mass., right, joins supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, during a rally outside Fort Lesley J. McNair, in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013. Mannings fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP PhotoManuel Balce Ceneta)
Heike Schotten, of Cambridge, Mass., right, joins supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, during a rally outside Fort Lesley J. McNair, in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013. Manning's fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier: a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, block the gate of Fort Lesley J. McNair, in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013. Mannings fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP PhotoManuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, block the gate of Fort Lesley J. McNair, in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013. Manning's fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier: a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, are prevented by base police from entering Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013, as protestors block the gate. Mannings fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP PhotoManuel Balce Ceneta)
Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, are prevented by base police from entering Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2013, as protestors block the gate. Manning's fate was in the hands of a military judge Friday after nearly two months of conflicting portrayals of the soldier: a traitor who gave WikiLeaks classified secrets for worldwide attention and a young, naive intelligence analyst who wanted people to know about the atrocities of war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
David Coombs, attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, smiles while talking with Manning supporters outside of a courthouse at Fort Mead, Md, Friday, July 26, 2013. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP PhotoCliff Owen))
David Coombs, attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, smiles while talking with Manning supporters outside of a courthouse at Fort Mead, Md, Friday, July 26, 2013. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen))
David Coombs, attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning speaks with Manning supporters outside of a courthouse at Fort Mead, Md, Friday, July 26, 2013. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP PhotoCliff Owen))
David Coombs, attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning speaks with Manning supporters outside of a courthouse at Fort Mead, Md, Friday, July 26, 2013. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen))
FILE - In this Monday, July 29, 2013, file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md. U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was acquitted Tuesday, July 30, 2013, of aiding the enemy for giving classified secrets to WikiLeaks. The military judge hearing the case, Army Col. Denise Lind, announced the verdict. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky, File)
FILE - In this Monday, July 29, 2013, file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md. U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was acquitted Tuesday, July 30, 2013, of aiding the enemy for giving classified secrets to WikiLeaks. The military judge hearing the case, Army Col. Denise Lind, announced the verdict. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
FILE -In this Monday, July 29, 2013 file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md. after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. US Army Pfc Bradley Manning was acquitted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 of aiding the enemy for giving secrets to WikiLeaks. Manning was convicted on espionage counts realted to the WikiLeaks case. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
FILE -In this Monday, July 29, 2013 file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md. after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. US Army Pfc Bradley Manning was acquitted Tuesday, July 30, 2013 of aiding the enemy for giving secrets to WikiLeaks. Manning was convicted on espionage counts realted to the WikiLeaks case. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/inthenews;inthenews=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
El soldado Bradley Manning, a la izquierda, acusado de filtrar informaci´n militar y diplomática a WikiLeaks, es conducido hacia un vehículo afuera de un tribunal en Fort Meade, Maryland, el lunes 29 de julio de 2013. Un reducido grupo de personas se manifestó a favor de Manning afuera de Fort Meade, el martes 30 de julio de 2013. (AP FotoPatrick Semansky)
El soldado Bradley Manning, a la izquierda, acusado de filtrar informaci´n militar y diplomática a WikiLeaks, es conducido hacia un vehículo afuera de un tribunal en Fort Meade, Maryland, el lunes 29 de julio de 2013. Un reducido grupo de personas se manifestó a favor de Manning afuera de Fort Meade, el martes 30 de julio de 2013. (AP Foto/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, July 30, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. The military judge hearing Mannings trial is expected to announce her decision Tuesday afternoon. Manning faces 21 counts including espionage, computer fraud and theft charges, but the most serious is aiding the enemy, which carries a possible life sentence. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, July 30, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. The military judge hearing Manning's trial is expected to announce her decision Tuesday afternoon. Manning faces 21 counts including espionage, computer fraud and theft charges, but the most serious is aiding the enemy, which carries a possible life sentence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning steps out of a security vehicle as he is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, July 30, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. The military judge hearing Mannings trial is expected to announce her decision Tuesday afternoon. Manning faces 21 counts including espionage, computer fraud and theft charges, but the most serious is aiding the enemy, which carries a possible life sentence. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning steps out of a security vehicle as he is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Tuesday, July 30, 2013, before a hearing in his court martial. The military judge hearing Manning's trial is expected to announce her decision Tuesday afternoon. Manning faces 21 counts including espionage, computer fraud and theft charges, but the most serious is aiding the enemy, which carries a possible life sentence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Timeline of events in the case of Bradley Manning, who published U.S. military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks 3c x 5 inches 146 mm x 127 mm
Timeline of events in the case of Bradley Manning, who published U.S. military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks; 3c x 5 inches; 146 mm x 127 mm;
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/inthenews;inthenews=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning steps into a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning steps into a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, center, is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP PhotoPatrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, center, is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, July 29, 2013, after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning faces charges including aiding the enemy, espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
El soldado Bradley Manning (derecha) es escoltado a un tribunal en Fort Meade, Maryland, el lunes 29 de julio de 2013, mientras la jueza militar coronel Denise Lind comienza su tercer día de deliberaciones en su corte marcial. (Foto APPatrick Semansky)
El soldado Bradley Manning (derecha) es escoltado a un tribunal en Fort Meade, Maryland, el lunes 29 de julio de 2013, mientras la jueza militar coronel Denise Lind comienza su tercer día de deliberaciones en su corte marcial. (Foto AP/Patrick Semansky)
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