G-7 leaders agree on vaccines, China and taxing corporations

G7_Summit_07771 First lady Jill Biden turns around to show the word "love" on the back of her jacket as she speaks with reporters after visiting with Carrie Johnson, wife of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, ahead of the G-7 summit, Thursday, June 10, 2021, in Carbis Bay, England.
APTOPIX_Britain_G7_59056 British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks with his wife Carrie during arrivals for the G7 meeting at the Carbis Bay Hotel in Carbis Bay, St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021. Leaders of the G7 gather for a second day of meetings on Saturday, in which they will discuss COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy.
APTOPIX_Britain_G7_12871 Activists march through the streets in during a demonstration around the meeting of the G7 in Falmouth, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021. Leaders of the G7 gather for a second day of meetings on Saturday, in which they will discuss COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy.
APTOPIX_Britain_G7_11016 The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, perform a fly-past over Carbis Bay during the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021.
Britain_G7_09371 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures, during a press conference on the final day of the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall, England, Sunday June 13, 2021.
Britain_G7_53109 The Red Arrows flight demonstration team performs an aerobatic display above Carbis Bay, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021, during the G-7 summit. The Red Arrows, officially known as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, is the aerobatics display team of the Royal Air Force.
APTOPIX_Britain_G7_63850 Protestors wearing giant heads portraying G7 leaders swim in the water during a demonstration outside the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy. Leaders portrayed from left, U.S. President Joe Biden, French President Emmanuel Macron, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
Britain_G7_68767 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson talks with South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa at the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021.
APTOPIX_Britain_G7_71903 Protestors wear giant heads portraying the leaders of the G7 as they play with bubbles during a demonstration on a beach outside the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy. Leaders portrayed from left, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Joe Biden and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
Britain_G7_95237 France's President Emmanuel Macron walks to a working session at the G7 summit in Cornwall, England, Saturday June 12, 2021.
Britain_G7_43215 Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the start of a bilateral meeting at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021.
Britain_G7_93377 British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his wife Carrie greet United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres, left, during arrivals for the G7 meeting in Carbis Bay, St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021. Leaders of the G7 gathered for a second day of meetings on Saturday, in which they will discuss COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy.
Britain_G7_14749 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures, during a press conference on the final day of the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall, England, Sunday June 13, 2021.
Britain_G7_63863 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks, during a press conference on the final day of the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall, England, Sunday June 13, 2021.
G7_Biden_32669 President Joe Biden speaks during a news conference after attending the G-7 summit, Sunday, June 13, 2021, at Cornwall Airport in Newquay, England. Biden is en route to Windsor, England, to meet with Queen Elizabeth II, and then on to Brussels to attend the NATO summit.
Britain_G7_71215 Protestors wearing giant heads portraying G7 leaders pose after a demonstration on a beach outside the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy. Leaders portrayed from left, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, U.S. President Joe Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson.
Britain_G7_11947 Protestors and others gather on the beach outside the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy.
Britain_G7_05604 Protestors wearing giant heads portraying G7 leaders participate in a demonstration on a beach outside the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy. Leaders portrayed from left, U.S. President Joe Biden, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
Britain_G7_31602 A woman walks over a sea wall on a beach outside the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy.
Britain_G7_80059 Climate activists pose next to a G7 sign as they demonstrate on a beach outside the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy.
Britain_G7_23125 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, and South Korea's President Moon Jae-in, react ahead of a bilateral meeting during the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, southern England, Sunday June 13, 2021.
Britain_G7_52797 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, with South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, ahead of their bilateral meeting during the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, southern England, Sunday June 13, 2021.
China_EU_G7_Summit_26613 Workers on a platform set up flowers decoration with a map showing the United States in Beijing, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the world's largest economies unveiled an infrastructure plan on Saturday for the developing world to compete with China's global initiatives, but they were searching for a consensus on how to forcefully to call out Beijing over human rights abuses.
Britain_G7_56369 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, sits with South Korea's President Moon Jae-in, ahead of a bilateral meeting during the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, southern England, Sunday June 13, 2021.
Britain_G7_52251 Police photograph along the route of the motorcade of U.S. President Joe Biden after he attended a church service with first lady Jill Biden prior to the G7 meeting in St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Leaders of the G7 wrap up three days of meetings in Carbis Bay Sunday, in which they discussed such topics as COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy.
Britain_G7_Biden_14363 U.S. President Joe Biden, centre, arrives for Mass at Sacred Heart and St. Ia Catholic Church, in St. Ives, southern England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. Biden is in England to attend the G-7 summit.
G7_Summit_36843 Leaders of the G7 pose for a group photo on overlooking the beach at the Carbis Bay Hotel in Carbis Bay, St. Ives, Cornwall, England, Friday, June 11, 2021. Leaders from left, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, European Council President Charles Michel, U.S. President Joe Biden, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italy's Prime Minister Mario Draghi, French President Emmanuel Macron, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
G7_Summit_43284 A woman walks her dogs as the incoming tide begins to wash away the heads of G7 leaders drawn in the sand by activists on the beach at Newquay, Cornwall, England, Thursday, June 10, 2021. G7 leaders and guests will meet in the the Cornish resort of Carbis Bay, St. Ives, starting Friday, June 11, 2021.
G7_Summit_59997 Britain's Queen Elizabeth II speaks to US President Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden during a reception with the G7 leaders at the Eden Project in Cornwall, England, Friday June 11, 2021, during the G7 summit.
G7_Summit_35737 President Joe Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron visit during a bilateral meeting at the G-7 summit, Saturday, June 12, 2021, in Carbis Bay, England.
G7_Summit_56688 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, his wife Carrie Johnson and U.S. President Joe Biden with first lady Jill Biden walk outside Carbis Bay Hotel, Carbis Bay, Cornwall, Britain, ahead of the G7 summit, Thursday June 10, 2021.
G7_Summit_56025 Activists wearing giant heads of the G7 leaders tussle over a giant COVID-19 vaccine syringe during an action of NGO's on Swanpool Beach in Falmouth, Cornwall, England, Friday, June 11, 2021. Leaders of the G7 begin their first of three days of meetings on Friday in Carbis Bay, in which they will discuss COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy. Depicted from left to right, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Italy's Prime Minister Mario Draghi, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, U.S. President Joe Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron.
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CARBIS BAY, England (AP) — Leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy nations staked their claim Sunday to leading the world out of the coronavirus pandemic and crisis, pledging more than 1 billion coronavirus vaccine doses to poorer nations, vowing to help developing countries grow while fighting climate change and backing a minimum tax on multinational firms.

At the group’s first face-to-face meeting in two years, the leaders dangled promises of support for global health, green energy, infrastructure and education — all to demonstrate that international cooperation is back after the upheavals caused by the pandemic and the unpredictability of former U.S. President Donald Trump.

During their three-day summit in southwest England, the G-7 leaders wanted to convey that the club of wealthy democracies — Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States — is a better friend to poorer nations than authoritarian rivals such as China.

“This isn’t about imposing our values on the rest of the world,” British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told reporters at the end of the seaside summit on the rugged Cornwall coast. “What we as the G-7 need to do is demonstrate the benefits of democracy and freedom and human rights to the rest of the world.”

U.S. President Joe Biden, who was making his first foreign trip as leader, said it was an “extraordinary, collaborative and productive meeting” that showed “America’s back in the business of leading the world alongside nations who share our most deeply held values.”

But health and environmental campaigners were distinctly unimpressed by the details in the leaders’ final communique.

“This G-7 summit will live on in infamy,” said Max Lawson, the head of inequality policy at the international aid group Oxfam. “Faced with the biggest health emergency in a century and a climate catastrophe that is destroying our planet, they have completely failed to meet the challenges of our times.”

Despite Johnson’s call to “vaccinate the world” by the end of 2022, the promise of 1 billion doses for vaccine-hungry countries — coming both directly and through donations to the international COVAX program — falls far short of the 11 billion doses the World Health Organization said is needed to vaccinate at least 70% of the world’s population and truly end the pandemic.

Half of the billion-dose pledge is coming from the United States and 100 million from Britain. Canada said it also would give 100 million doses, and France pledged 60 million. Altogether, the leaders said they pledged 870 million doses “directly over the next year,” with further contributions taking the total to the “equivalent of over 1 billion doses.”

Former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said the lack of a more ambitious vaccination plan was “an unforgivable moral failure.”

But Biden said the leaders were clear that the commitments they made to donate doses wouldn’t be the end. The U.S. president said getting shots into arms around the world was a “gigantic, logistical effort” and the goal might not be accomplished until 2023.

The G-7 also backed a minimum tax of at least 15% on large multinational companies to stop corporations from using tax havens to avoid taxes, a move championed by the United States.

Biden also wanted to persuade fellow democratic leaders to present a more unified front to compete economically with Beijing and strongly call out China’s “nonmarket policies and human rights abuses.”

The language on China in the G-7 leaders’ communique from the meeting was more muted than the United States has used, but Biden said he was satisfied. On China’s economic behavior, the group said it would “consult on collective approaches to challenging non-market policies and practices which undermine the fair and transparent operation of the global economy.”

The leaders also said they would promote their values by calling on China to respect human rights and fundamental freedoms in Xinjiang, where Beijing is accused of committing serious human rights abuses against the Uyghur minority, and in the semi-autonomous city of Hong Kong.

Not every European power has viewed China in as harsh a light as Biden, who has painted the rivalry with the techno-security state as the defining competition of the 21st century.

“The G-7 is not a club hostile to China,” French President Emmanuel Macron said. “It’s an ensemble of democracies that (would) work with China on all world topics that China is ready to work on with us.”

Johnson, the summit’s host, wanted the three-day meeting to fly the flag for a “Global Britain,” his government’s push to give the midsized country, newly detached from the European Union, outsized global influence.

Yet Brexit cast a shadow over that goal during the summit on the coast of southwest England. European Union leaders and Biden voiced concerns about problems with new U.K.-EU trade rules that have heightened tensions in Northern Ireland.

But overall, the mood was positive: The leaders smiled for the cameras on the beach at cliff-fringed Carbis Bay, a village and resort that became a traffic-clogged fortress for the meeting.

The prime ministers and presidents also mingled with Queen Elizabeth II at a royal reception, ate steak and lobster at a beach barbecue and watched an aeronautic display by the Royal Air Force Red Arrows during their stay by the sea.

America’s allies were visibly relieved to have the U.S. back as an engaged international player after the “America First” policy of the Trump administration.

Johnson called Biden “a breath of fresh air.” Italian Premier Mario Draghi said the president “wanted to rebuild what were the traditional alliances of the United States after the period of Trump, during which these alliances were seriously cracked.”

Biden flew from the summit in Carbis Bay to have tea with the queen at Windsor Castle. He is scheduled to attend a NATO summit in Brussels on Monday and to hold talks with Russian leader Vladimir Putin in Geneva on Wednesday.

The G-7 also made ambitious declarations during their meetings about girls’ education, preventing future pandemics and financing greener infrastructure globally

On climate change, the “Build Back Better for the World” plan promises to offer financing for infrastructure — “from railways in Africa to wind farms in Asia” — to help speed up the global shift to renewable energy. The plan is a response to China’s “belt and road” initiative, which has increased Beijing’s worldwide influence.

All G-7 countries have pledged to reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, but many environmentalists say that will be too little, too late.

Naturalist David Attenborough addressed the leaders by video Sunday, warning that humanity is “on the verge of destabilizing the entire planet.”

“If that is so, then the decisions we make this decade — in particular the decisions made by the most economically advanced nations — are the most important in human history,” the veteran documentary filmmaker said.

As the leaders met behind fences and barbed wire, thousands of environmental protesters gathered throughout the weekend outside the ring of steel to accuse the G-7 of missing a chance to prevent climate catastrophe.

Members of the Extinction Rebellion climate activism group blocked the main road of the town of St. Ives on Sunday, banging drums and sitting on the road. Elsewhere, hundreds of surfers and kayakers paddled out to sea to urge better protection for the world’s oceans.

“G-7 is all greenwashing,” protesters sang during one march. “We’re drowning in promises, now’s the time to act.”

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Lawless, Kirka and Hui reported from Falmouth, England. Nicole Winfield in Rome and Kirsten Grieshaber and Frank Jordans in Berlin contributed.

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Follow all AP stories on climate change issues at https://apnews.com/hub/Climate.

Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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