30 Top Things to Do in Oklahoma

Oklahoma is rich in history, both in terms of Native American legacy and life on the frontier. From the state-of-the-art Gathering Place in Tulsa to the futuristic Pops roadside attraction in Arcadia to the Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee, there’s plenty to see, learn and experience throughout the state. If you’re planning a visit to the Sooner State, this guide can help you find the top things to do.

(Note: Some of the following activities, attractions and locations may be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. New policies may be in place, including capacity restrictions, reservation requirements or mask mandates. Check with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of State and local tourism boards before traveling.)

Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

On April 19, 1995, a tragedy rocked Oklahoma when Timothy McVeigh and accomplice Terry Nichols committed the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. McVeigh’s homemade bomb, stashed in a rented truck, killed 168 people in and around the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City and injured several hundred more.

The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum remembers and honors the victims and survivors of that horrific day. Visitors can view photos, biographies and stories of those impacted by the bombing, as well as read about the heroic efforts by citizens, first responders and leaders from around the nation who came to the aid of survivors buried in the wreckage and helped the city and state heal. Visitors call the memorial and museum a sobering experience but say the stories are told respectfully; if you don’t have time for the museum, the memorial alone is worth a visit. Note that you’ll want to reserve a ticket to the museum in advance, as a limited number of timed tickets are available each hour.

Address: 620 N. Harvey Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Oklahoma City Museum of Art

About half a mile from the bombing memorial in Oklahoma City sits one of the region’s leading art institutions. The Oklahoma City Museum of Art has an impressive range of exhibitions, from paintings and photography to glass pieces and sculptures from around the world — though its specialty is American art and postwar abstraction. A state-of-the-art theater offers on-site film screenings on certain days throughout the year for an additional fee. Many past visitors have specifically called out the museum’s collection of Dale Chihuly’s glass masterpieces as a highlight. The museum doesn’t have its own parking lot, so you may need to find a paid public parking space. If you want to stay nearby and take in yet more art, you can’t go wrong with the 21c Museum Hotel Oklahoma City, a former car assembly plant turned into a stylish boutique hotel that houses its own contemporary art gallery inside.

Address: 415 Couch Drive, Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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Five Civilized Tribes Museum

Located in Muskogee, less than 50 miles southeast of Tulsa, the Five Civilized Tribes Museum is focused on preserving the history, art and culture of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee and Seminole nations. The term that gives the institution its name came into use in the 1800s to describe the seeming assimilation of these five Native American peoples to the norms of white Americans. This museum houses artwork, artifacts and displays detailing the history of the tribes and their removal from their lands. If you want to learn more about each Indigenous nation, you can also visit the Cherokee National History Museum in Tahlequah, the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, the Choctaw Cultural Center in Calera, the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Museum in Okmulgee and the Seminole Nation Museum in Wewoka.

Address: 1101 Honor Heights Drive, Muskogee, OK 74401

National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

If you’re interested in learning about Western history, culture and art, the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City is a must. The museum is home to artifacts, artwork and interactive exhibits that give you a taste of what it was like to live in the Old West and how the influences of that period in U.S. history permeate our culture today. You’ll be able to learn about the American cowboy, rodeos, Native American culture, the frontier military, Victorian-era firearms and more. The museum also hosts a number of events throughout the year, including OktoberWest, the Cowboy Christmas Ball, book clubs, painting workshops, contemporary art sales and more. Visitors say you can spend several hours in the museum without seeing everything it has to offer.

Address: 1700 NE 63rd St., Oklahoma City, OK 73111

Visit Bricktown

Located in the heart of downtown Oklahoma City, Bricktown is a dining and entertainment district set within a restored warehouse neighborhood. This popular destination is located on a canal that links Bricktown with downtown and the Oklahoma River. While here, travelers can dine at a variety of restaurants and nightclubs, including The Mantel Wine Bar & Bistro, which serves New American cuisine, and the Bourbon St. Cafe. For activities and socializing, HeyDay Entertainment has bowling and an arcade, while Brickopolis has a multilevel laser tag experience where participants hunt aliens, plus an outdoor putt-putt course, climbing wall and bungee trampoline. There’s also an array of shops for a little retail therapy, and the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark with minor league baseball games and Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame are steps away.

Address: 429 E. California Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73104

Gathering Place

This free riverfront park in Tulsa unfurls across more than 65 acres — and the city has plans to expand it to 100. Gathering Place boasts more than 100 unique experiences, including an adventure playground, climbing structures, suspension bridges, slides, puzzles, a sensory garden, a reading tree, a picnic grove and many other attractions. If you’re planning a day at Gathering Place, you don’t even need to leave for meals: Instead, visit one of the three restaurants within the park. There’s also an opportunity to enjoy the flora and fauna of Oklahoma, with 400 species of plants, 16 acres of wildflowers, and animals such as great blue herons, squirrels, turtles, bats, owls and more. Past visitors call the park a Tulsa gem and highly recommend it for families with children. If you’re planning on staying the night in the city, the Ambassador Hotel Tulsa, Autograph Collection less than 2 miles from the park is highly rated for its amenities and dining.

Address: 2650 S. John Williams Way E., Tulsa, OK 74114

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Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden

The Oklahoma City Zoo seeks to let guests connect with wildlife, and as such you’ll be able to see around 1,900 animals throughout the zoo’s 140 acres. In addition to regular admission, there are a number of activities you can pay extra for, including the chance to ride a camel, feed a giraffe or rhino, explore a one-of-a-kind exhibit of toy brick animals or take a safari cart tour. Also for an additional fee, the zoo offers up-close encounters with grizzly bears, bison, Indian rhinos, Galápagos tortoises, sea lions and Asian elephants. You can sit down for a meal at a handful of restaurants within the zoo, though some of the options are seasonal. The botanical garden, filled with exotic animals and native plants, covers 120 acres and features flowering trees, wildflower meadows, the largest outdoor butterfly garden and more. Zoo guests say there’s plenty of shade, and it offers a lot of fun activities for the whole family.

Address: 2000 Remington Place, Oklahoma City, OK 73111

Factory Obscura Mix-Tape

Factory Obscura Mix-Tape is an immersive and interactive art experience in Oklahoma City. A team of around 30 artists ranging from muralists to musicians alongside community volunteers created this 6,000-square-foot space filled with art you can touch. Visitors say it’s unlike any other place you’ve experienced and can make you feel confused, excited and amused all at the same time. Each element is handcrafted and intended to be accessible for people with vision or hearing loss; there are also spaces designed like “sensory rooms” to accommodate those with autism.

Address: 25 NW 9th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102

Pops 66 Soda Ranch

Situated on the old Route 66 in Arcadia, just outside of Oklahoma City, you’ll find the Pops 66 Soda Ranch. The first thing you’ll see is the 66-foot soda bottle, which lights up with different colors at sunset. Visitors can see and buy soda drinks of just about every color and flavor possible, and then check out a variety of other souvenirs such as clothing and hats. You can also stop by the restaurant for a meal or even to just sit down and enjoy a milkshake. Travelers note this small attraction as a great place for a break if you’re exploring Route 66 and enjoy seeing all the different soda flavors that are available.

Address: 660 W. U.S. Route 66, Arcadia, OK 73007

45th Infantry Thunderbird Museum

The 45th infantry division was first organized in 1923 and included service members from Oklahoma, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. Nicknamed the Thunderbirds, the division was one of the first National Guard units to be activated for World War II and also fought in the Korean War. At this Oklahoma City museum, which is the largest you’ll find dedicated to the state’s military history, visitors can peruse a variety of military weapons and see the cartoon collection of division member Bill Mauldin, as well as learn about the history of the Thunderbirds, including their participation in the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp, and more. On the grounds of the museum, you’ll find more than 60 military tanks, vehicles, guns and aircraft. Past visitors of the museum say it’s an excellent stop for military buffs and that the guides are very knowledgeable.

Address: 2145 NE 36th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73111

Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve

Less than 50 miles north of Tulsa, Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve was initially a ranch retreat built in 1925 by oil baron Frank Phillips. The 3,700-acre space is now a wildlife preserve, home to bison, elk, longhorn cattle and many other species. The museum offers a unique display of Western art and artifacts such as sculptures, ranch memorabilia and old photographs, in addition to a Colt firearms collection and Native American pieces that span pottery, art, baskets, blankets and beads. Travelers call the preserve a pleasant surprise that offers something for just about everyone who visits. If you’re planning to stay near the preserve, consider the Hilton Garden Inn Bartlesville or the Hampton Inn Bartlesville.

Address: 1925 Woolaroc Ranch Road, Bartlesville, OK 74003

Beavers Bend State Park

Located in the southeast corner near Broken Bow, this nearly 3,500-acre state park is one of the most popular natural areas in Oklahoma. Outdoor adventurers will have plenty of activities to choose from, including hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, river floating and more. At Broken Bow Lake, you’ll have opportunities to fish, boat, water ski, canoe and even scuba dive. You can even bring your golf clubs and play the Cedar Creek Golf Course. Some of the other activities include volleyball, mini golf and tennis. Visitors can stay in one of the park’s cabins, RV sites or almost 400 campsites. There’s also a lodge on the shore of the lake that you can stay in. Visitors say the park is clean and beautiful, with plenty of scenic views while you’re off the grid.

For other entertainment, nearby Hochatown offers a variety of family-friendly amusements including bowling and trail rides. What’s more, the town has ATV, slingshot and power sports rentals, along with Hochatown restaurants and additional lodging.

Six Flags Frontier City

If you’re looking for a full day of fun in Oklahoma City, look no further than Six Flags Frontier City. The theme park has rides for all age groups, including attractions for the most avid thrill-seekers. The park also houses what it calls the largest water structure in Oklahoma: Wild West Water Works, which is included in park admission, features a playground, slides, a tipping bucket and more. If you’re planning to stay all day, plenty of restaurants throughout the park can sate your hunger, or you can browse the shops for snacks, souvenirs and gifts. Past guests say it can be a great experience if you have kids, but note that park rides can be consistently down. Six Flags Frontier City typically closes for winter, so be sure to consult the park’s schedule before planning your visit.

Address: 11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road, Oklahoma City, OK 73131

Experience life at Orr Family Farm

Situated in the southern part of Oklahoma City, Orr Family Farm has been designed as a family-friendly attraction since it first opened its doors in 2004. Some activities, including the tube rollers, life-size foosball field, gemstone mining and cannon blasters, are available in both the spring and fall, but the farm also has seasonally specific attractions, such as autumn’s pumpkin patch and hayrides. Orr Family Farm is open from March to late June, as well as mid-September through mid-November, but fear not if you want to enjoy this attraction in summer or winter: You can stay overnight on the farm in a conical tent or Conestoga wagon for an upscale camping experience year-round. As a glamping guest, you’ll get access to certain attractions even when the farm is closed to the public. Visitors say Orr Family Farm is an excellent option if you have small children and recommend staying in the covered wagon or tent for at least one night.

Address: 14400 S. Western Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73170

Oklahoma Route 66 Museum

With about a 90-mile drive west of Oklahoma City, you can visit the Oklahoma Route 66 Museum in Clinton. The museum details the complete history of one of the first and most famous highways in the U.S. You’ll be exposed to images, myths, and stories about life and travel along the route, as well as what it took to make the iconic road possible. You can also step back in time at the 1950s diner and listen to the music of the time. At the end of your experience, consider stopping by the gift shop to buy signs, books, clothing, toys, games or other items to commemorate your experience. Visitors say the museum tells a compelling story of Route 66, even if you’re not particularly fascinated by the highway’s history. If you’re thinking about staying the night in Clinton, the Hampton Inn Clinton and La Quinta Inn & Suites by Wyndham Clinton Historic Route 66 are both highly rated by fellow travelers.

Address: 2229 W. Gary Blvd., Clinton, OK 73601

Philbrook Museum of Art

If you’re going to be in Tulsa, stop by the Philbrook Museum of Art for a cultural experience. The museum first opened in 1939 after Waite Phillips gifted his 72-room mansion, Villa Philbrook, to the city. Now, the historic home is joined by a 70,000-square-foot wing and a 25-acre garden and has been called the most beautiful place in Oklahoma. You can take a self-guided tour through the museum and its grounds or consult the museum schedule to sign up for one led by a curator. You’ll be able to see various pieces of art, sculptures, pottery, furniture and photographs from around the world. Many travelers rate it the best thing to do in Tulsa and say the garden alone is worth the cost of admission.

Address: 2727 S. Rockford Road, Tulsa, OK 74114

Oklahoma State Capitol

The Sooner State’s Capitol building is unique in that it’s the only state capitol surrounded by working oil wells. Guided tours, which last about 45 minutes, can walk you through Oklahoma history and the building’s Greco-Roman architecture, but you’ll want to schedule them in advance. You can also take a self-guided tour of the more than 100-acre property with the aid of a brochure. In addition to 650 rooms, the Oklahoma State Capitol houses murals, restored stained glass, art exhibits and a tribal flag plaza. Visitors say the building’s artwork is impressive and the guides are very knowledgeable.

Address: 2300 N. Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73105

Oklahoma History Center

Although Oklahoma has plenty of museums where you can learn about different aspects of the state’s history, you won’t want to miss the Oklahoma History Center. This Smithsonian affiliate provides a comprehensive look at the state’s history of Native American culture, pioneers, aviation, commerce and more. Even before you enter the museum’s doors, you’ll be able to take a quarter-mile walking tour of the gardens, where you’ll get a sample of Oklahoma’s terrains, trees, flowers and plants. There are also various statues, an oil and gas park, a Vietnam-era helicopter and other attractions on the museum grounds. Inside the museum, you’ll learn about the history of free enterprise in the state, astronauts and aviators, Oklahoma’s early settlers and development into a state, and more. Visitors say that the Oklahoma City museum offers an excellent, holistic look at the state’s history and can leave you with a deeper appreciation of Oklahoma.

Address: 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, Oklahoma City, OK 73105

Forgotten Wheels Museum

For vintage vehicle enthusiasts, the Forgotten Wheels Museum in Davis, about 80 miles south of Oklahoma City, is a must. The museum offers an impressive array of antique cars and trucks, older authentic Harley Davidson motorcycles — including more than two dozen Harley Hummers that date back to 1948 — and riding accessories. You’ll also find other antique collectibles, postcards, children’s toys and more. Past guests say that the museum is small but full of nostalgia. If you’re thinking about staying overnight in Davis, consider Treasure Valley Casino & Hotel or La Ville Inn.

Address: 1775 U.S. Route 77, Davis, OK 73030

Washita Battlefield National Historic Site

One of many historic landmarks in Oklahoma, the Washita Battlefield National Historic Site is located in Cheyenne, a little more than 130 miles west of Oklahoma City. This location marks where in 1868 Lt. Col. George Custer made a surprise attack on the Southern Cheyenne village led by Peace Chief Black Kettle, leading to a massacre. The self-guided trail for the site is 1.5 miles long and has 15 stops. You can also step into the visitor center to explore the different exhibits and watch a 27-minute film about the events that led to the ambush and massacre of Indigenous people. Finally, you can visit the Washita Native Garden, where you’ll find plants used by the Cheyenne people for daily living, food, medicinal purposes and domestic use. Past visitors say that the Washita Battlefield National Historic Site provides important insight into a dark aspect of U.S. history, and the stories are ones that need to be remembered. There aren’t any hotels in Cheyenne, but if you want to stay nearby to take your time exploring this site, options include the Executive Plus Inn & Suites and the Flamingo Inn, both of which are about 20 miles away in Elk City.

Address: 18555 state Highway 47A, Cheyenne, OK 73628

Lake Tenkiller

Located about 85 miles southeast of Tulsa, Lake Tenkiller is a favorite among Oklahoma residents for its rocky bluffs and wooded shores, its clear waters with a slight emerald hue, and its amenities. The reservoir is an excellent place for hiking, fishing and boating; if you’re a scuba diver, you’ll probably love the underwater dive park, which features a helicopter, sunken boats and a plane fuselage. If you’re hoping for an exclusively outdoor experience, there are campgrounds in Tenkiller State Park and Cherokee Landing State Park, both of which surround the lake. But there are also hotels, motels and vacation rentals in nearby towns, including Talequah and Muskogee. Visitors and locals say the beauty of Lake Tenkiller is tough to beat and that this reservoir is best for water sports and relaxing on the shore.

First Americans Museum

In Oklahoma City, the First Americans Museum, which opened in September 2021, provides a collective history of the 39 Native American nations that reside in Oklahoma today. While only a few are Indigenous to what is now the state, the rest were removed from their homelands and relocated here in a forced migration known as the Trail of Tears. You’ll learn about their unique cultures, resilience and contributions through a variety of museum exhibits with first-person narratives and multimedia experiences. You can also join workshops with artists, artisans and performers, which are held at different times throughout the year and require registering in advance. Visitors say the new museum provides a wonderful and thought-provoking representation of the First Americans.

Address: 659 First Americans Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73129

The Cave House of Tulsa

Near downtown Tulsa, you may come across a home that looks like it was pulled from “The Flintstones.” The Cave House is arguably the quirkiest building in the city and was originally built in the 1920s as a restaurant by day and speakeasy at night; a secret tunnel via the fireplace led to a large room set in the hill behind the front portion of the restaurant. Unfortunately, the tunnel has been sealed off, but visitors today can schedule a guided tour of the unique structure. Some swear the Cave House is haunted, which could make it an appealing stop for travelers fascinated by the paranormal. Visitors say the current owner of the home is just as unique as the structure itself and provides guests with fascinating and passionate stories throughout the tour. Tours are available by appointment, so call 918-378-1952 before your trip to reserve a time.

Address: 1623 W. Charles Page Blvd., Tulsa, OK 74127

Joseph H. Williams Tallgrass Prairie Preserve

The Joseph H. Williams Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, spread across 40,000 acres about 75 miles northwest of Tulsa, is the largest protected area of tallgrass prairie in the world. The preserve was first created in 1989 when the Nature Conservancy purchased the Barnard Ranch. You can make the scenic 50-mile drive through the prairie and its adjacent ranches, which can take about two hours with stops. Throughout the preserve you can see more than 210 species of birds, as well as bobcats, armadillos, badgers, woodchucks, white-tailed deer and more. There’s a dedicated bison unit with more than 2,100 American bison, one of the largest herds in the country. You can also step out of your car at one of the designated picnic areas, enjoy a self-guided nature trail and check out the ranch bunkhouse built in 1920. Visitors say the abundance of wildlife and beauty of the prairie are worth the drive. You can’t camp in the preserve, but you can camp nearby at Chase State Fishing Lake and Swope Park. Lodgings are also available in the nearby town of Emporia, among others.

Address: 15316 County Road 4201, Pawhuska, OK 74056

Science Museum Oklahoma

Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is known for its hands-on approach to teaching science, art and history. Children can wander the 20,000-square-foot CurioCity and learn through interactive activities. The Kirkpatrick Planetarium features shows exploring the cosmos that are included with your admission to the museum. This institution has a range of other exhibits with opportunities to learn about your body’s heat patterns, decorate and color an animal in a digitally simulated forest, and more. Past guests say that while it’s especially worth visiting if you’re traveling with kids, guests of all ages will appreciate time spent here.

Address: 2020 Remington Place, Oklahoma City, OK 73111

Henry and Anna Overholser Mansion

This mansion was built in 1903 by Henry Overholser — who is considered the “father of Oklahoma City” — and his wife, Anna. Now, the Henry and Anna Overholser Mansion serves as a museum where visitors can learn about the family, as well as their servants and neighbors. Self-guided tours with an introduction given by the museum’s manager are available on certain days, but you’ll need to book in advance unless you happen to visit on one of the mansion’s “drop-in” days; check its website for more information. If you’re visiting Oklahoma City in October, buy a ticket for the History and Haunts tour, which begins after dark on select days and includes scary stories in Oklahoma history. Past visitors say the tour lasts about an hour and presents an interesting slice of the state’s history.

Address: 405 NW 15th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73103

Museum of the Great Plains

About 85 miles southwest of Oklahoma City, you’ll find the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton. The museum offers interactive exhibits and self-directed activities that allow guests to learn about human history on the Great Plains, as well as the present and the future of the region. Browse artwork, artifacts, archaeological finds, archives such as advertisements and more. You can also sit down in the auditorium for educational films that can vary depending on the date and time. Visitors say the exhibits are well organized, engaging and educational for all ages. If you’re looking for accommodations in Lawton, consider the Homewood Suites by Hilton Lawton or the Sleep Inn & Suites Lawton Near Fort Sill.

Address: 601 NW Ferris Ave., Lawton, OK 73507

Explore the Rhythm & Routes Oklahoma Music Trail

From jazz and Western swing to blues and modern country music, there are many musicians, performers and venues that have played an important role in the history of the state. To commemorate this, the Rhythm & Routes Oklahoma Music Trail highlights places to visit that were selected to be a part of this trail due to their significant connection and contribution to the state’s music history. Oklahoma has a helpful website where visitors can learn more about the trail, see a list of inductees, and plan an itinerary based on a music genre or artist.

There are many famous musicians with highlighted itineraries, including the greatest-selling solo artist in U.S. history, Garth Brooks. His itinerary highlights Brooks’ hometown of Yukon (17 miles west of Oklahoma City), where visitors can see the water tower that says “Home of Garth Brooks” and drive along Garth Brooks Boulevard. You can then venture to Stillwater to visit Willie’s Saloon (now State Room Bar), where he played regularly while attending Oklahoma State University, and the Tumbleweed Dance Hall, where Brooks worked as a bouncer.

Another popular itinerary option is Carrie Underwood’s route, with stops at the Happy Paws Animal Shelter she opened in her hometown of Checotah as well as her high school. The Reba McEntire itinerary lets you see her hometown of Chockie, drive along Reba McEntire Avenue in Stringtown and visit the McSwain Theater in Ada, where McEntire performed before being discovered. What’s more, Reba’s Place, a new dining and entertainment venue in Atoka, is scheduled to open in November 2022.

Myriad Botanical Gardens

You’ll find this 15-acre natural oasis right in the heart of downtown Oklahoma City. Myriad Botanical Gardens features ornamental gardens, a carousel, an outdoor ice rink during the winter, a dog park, splash pads for the summer, a children’s garden and playground, and more. Before your trip, look at this attraction’s calendar for concerts, bulb displays, movies, classes, children’s festivals and other special events that you might enjoy. Some say the gardens feel like an escape from the bustle of the city and offer a relaxing experience.

Address: 301 W. Reno Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102

See a TV filming set in Pawhuska

Fans of the Food Network show “The Pioneer Woman” venture to this town in Osage County where they can tour The Lodge at Drummond Ranch, the filming location of the popular cooking show. While tickets are not offered in advance, visitors can go to The Mercantile in downtown Pawhuska, where complimentary tickets are available for tours offered on that particular day. (Note, as it is a filming location on a working ranch, daily tours are not available; be sure to check the calendar before planning your trip). While at The Mercantile — the destination restaurant owned by Food Network star Ree Drummond and her husband — you can have breakfast, lunch or dinner in the restaurant; grab a fresh-baked treat or crafted coffee at the bakery; and shop for fun finds in the historic century-old building on Main Street. What’s more, you can spend the night in “cowboy luxury” at The Pioneer Woman Boarding House. Just a few steps from “The Merc,” this eight-room hotel owned by the “Pioneer Woman” herself offers regionally inspired decor and walls adorned with photographs taken by Ree Drummond.

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30 Top Things to Do in Oklahoma originally appeared on usnews.com

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