3 Reasons Your High School Teachers Are Valuable ACT, SAT Prep Resources

When high school students think of SAT or ACT test prep resources, items like physical study guides and YouTube tutorials likely come to mind. However, your own teachers — particularly in English, math and science — are also a highly valuable resource and often are overlooked.

Teachers make fantastic test prep resources for a number of reasons, including the following three.

Teachers Can Identify Which ACT, SAT Concepts Will Not Be Covered in Class or Covered in Less Detail

Teachers are intimately familiar with the curricula they impart in their classes — first, because they must ensure it prepares students for state-mandated assessments, and second, because planning requires them to always look ahead in their course content.

[Read: How Habit-Forming Routines Can Train Your ACT, SAT Test-Taking Brain.]

Therefore, if you show your teacher an ACT or SAT question, he or she can quickly tell you whether a similar concept is featured in the class curriculum and, if so, to what extent.

It is invaluable to know which topics you will learn about in school because that information can help you determine how much time to spend studying them outside of class. Although you may be able to arrive at such a conclusion after some independent research, you probably can not do so as quickly or as accurately as a high school instructor can.

Teachers Can Point You Toward Study Materials That Are Personalized to Your Needs

A teacher who spends multiple hours with you each week is likely to develop a sound understanding of your academic profile. In fact, after a few weeks of classes with you, a highly experienced teacher will be able to identify your strengths, weaknesses and learning style.

[Read: Discover How to Align ACT, SAT Prep to Your Learning Style.]

Teachers also tend to have the inside scoop on study materials you may have never heard of or would struggle to find on your own. If you are lucky, your instructor may even be able to provide some helpful photocopies of test prep exercises. Even more significant, if you have a close relationship, a teacher may go so far as to lend you some books from his or her classroom or personal library.

In addition, your instructor can give you general test prep advice that can be just as helpful or more so than study materials themselves. During their collegiate training, teachers are required to take courses in education, psychology and other social sciences, all of which put them in a position to advise you on best study practices. But remember: To access this assistance, you must first politely ask for their help.

Teachers Can Help You Join Forces With Other Students for Review Sessions and Exam Insight

You are most likely not the first pupil in your class, grade or school to ask a teacher about the ACT or SAT. It is normal for students to bring up these important assessments to their instructors, whether to express concerns or to gather information.

[Read: 6 Tips for SAT, ACT Test Prep Procrastinators]

As a result, your teacher knows which students are seriously looking to prepare for these exams — essential information if you tend to learn a great deal from group study sessions. Your teacher can introduce you to such students.

An idea to mention to your teacher, if it is not being done already, is to compile the contact information of all the students who are interested in studying together. If the list is posted securely online or in the classroom, students can then reach out to one another on their own. Some students find this option more comfortable because it allows them to choose who they work with.

In short, do not underestimate the value of your high school teachers as ACT and SAT test prep resources.

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3 Reasons Your High School Teachers Are Valuable ACT, SAT Prep Resources originally appeared on usnews.com

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