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The Latest: Family: Doomed flight was property scouting trip

DALLAS (AP) — The Latest on a Texas plane crash that killed all six people on board (all times local):

10 p.m.

The family of one of the six people killed in the crash of a twin-engine aircraft in the Texas Hill Country says the flight was to survey some property when the plane crashed.

In a statement to KTRK-TV of Houston, the family of Houston landscape architect Marc Teppesen says he and associate Mark Scioneaux (SY’-uh-noh) were on the scouting trip when Houston architect Scott Reagan Miller, Houston real estate investor Stuart Kensinger and his wife Angela Kensinger, and Houston investment banker Jeffrey Weiss died in the Monday plane crash.

Weiss was the pilot on the flight from West Houston Airport when his Beechcraft BE58 went down while approaching Kerrville Municipal Airport, about 70 miles (110 kilometers) northwest of San Antonio.

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9 p.m.

A Houston investment banker active in local charities is among the six people killed when a twin-engine aircraft crashed into the rock terrain of the Texas Hill Country in central Texas.

Jeffrey C. Weiss was a senior vice president for investments at Raymond James and Associates in Houston. The Texas Department of Public Safety says the 65-year-old Weiss, who co-owned the Beechcraft BE58, was at the controls when the aircraft went down just before 9 a.m. Monday while approaching Kerrville Municipal Airport, about 70 miles (110 kilometers) northwest of San Antonio.

DPS Sgt. Orlando Moreno identified the other dead as 55-year-old Stuart Roben Kensinger, 54-year-old Angela Webb Kensinger, 58-year-old Mark Damien Scioneaux, 55-year-old Scott Reagan Miller and 45-year-old Marc Tellepsen, all of Houston.

Weiss owned the plane with his friend and fellow pilot Charles Morina. He said Weiss loved to fly and the pair volunteered their time transporting sick people from remote regions to Texas hospitals for Angel Flight.

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5:10 p.m.

One of the two owners of a small plane involved in a deadly crash in central Texas says he can’t confirm who was on the flight.

Charles Morina tells The Associated Press that the twin-engine plane that went down near Kerrville on Monday was well maintained. The Dallas resident says he also doesn’t know what caused the crash that killed all six people on board.

Morina says he and a friend owned the plane. He says they regularly volunteered to fly sick people in remote parts of the country to hospitals in Houston and Dallas.

Investigators haven’t released the names of those killed. The AP could not immediately reach the other owner of the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the plane crashed just before 9 a.m. as it was preparing to land at Kerrville Municipal Airport, about 70 miles (110 kilometers) northwest of San Antonio.

The Texas Department of Public Safety says the pilot and all five passengers were killed.

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12:20 p.m.

Authorities say six people have died in a small plane crash in central Texas.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the twin-engine plane crashed just before 9 a.m. Monday as it was preparing to land at an airport in Kerrville, about 70 miles (110 kilometers) northwest of San Antonio.

Texas Department of Public Safety Sgt. Orlando Moreno says all six people aboard the plane were killed and that federal investigators are headed to the crash site.

An FAA spokesman says the Beechcraft plane took off from an airport outside Houston earlier Monday and crashed about 6 mile (10 kilometers) northwest of Kerrville Municipal Airport.

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