AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EDT

GOP, Kavanaugh accuser in standoff over her Senate testimony

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee chairman on Friday rejected key concessions sought by Brett Kavanaugh’s accuser if she is testify about her claim Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers, and threatened a Monday vote by his panel on Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination without a quick agreement.

Minutes before a 10 p.m. deadline set by Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, an attorney for Christine Blasey Ford asked for another day to decide. Lawyer Debra Katz said the time limit’s “sole purpose is to bully Dr. Ford and deprive her of the ability to make a considered decision that has life-altering implications for her and her family.”

Grassley issued no immediate statement as his deadline expired, and the late-night brinkmanship left in question whether Ford would appear before the GOP-run committee and tell lawmakers and a captivated nation about her allegation. Now a 53-year-old California psychology professor, Ford says an inebriated Kavanaugh pinned her on a bed, muffled her cries and tried removing her clothes when both were teenagers in the 1980s.

Grassley turned down Ford’s request that only senators, not attorneys, be allowed to ask questions. The committee’s 11 Republicans — all men — have been seeking an outside female attorney to interrogate Ford, mindful of the election-season impression that could be left by men trying to pick apart a woman’s assertion of a sexual attack.

He also rejected her proposal that she testify after Kavanaugh, a position lawyers consider advantageous because it gives them a chance to rebut accusations.

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AP sources: Rosenstein spoke of possible secret Trump taping

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein discussed secretly recording President Donald Trump last year as law enforcement agencies grew increasingly unnerved about chaos in the White House, according to people familiar with the exchange. One person who was present at the time said Rosenstein was just being sarcastic.

Trump spoke later Friday of a “lingering stench” at the Justice Department, though he didn’t name names. But the reports add fuel to Trump’s longstanding claims that his law enforcement agencies are biased against him and determined to undermine his presidency.

Rosenstein’s comments were first reported Friday by The New York Times. The Times also said Rosenstein raised the idea of using the 25th Amendment to remove Trump as unfit for office.

Rosenstein issued a swift denial.

“I never pursued or authorized recording the President and any suggestion that I have ever advocated for the removal of the President is absolutely false,” he said.

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Trump says he’ll rid Justice Dept. of ‘lingering stench’

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — President Donald Trump issued an ominous warning about the Justice Department and the FBI on Friday, promising further firings to get rid of a “lingering stench” following reports that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein discussed secretly recording the president.

Trump, speaking at a rally in Missouri, did not explicitly mention the Rosenstein furor, which was first reported by The New York Times and confirmed by The Associated Press.

But Trump lashed out against what he sees as anti-Trump bias in the Justice Department, touting the firings he has orchestrated, unnerving many in federal law enforcement and sparking fears about the future of the special counsel’s Russia probe, which Rosenstein oversees.

“You’ve seen what happened in the FBI and the Department of Justice. The bad ones, they’re all gone. They’re all gone,” Trump said. “But there is a lingering stench and we’re going to get rid of that, too.”

One person present during Rosenstein’s remarks said he was being sarcastic. The Times also said he raised the idea of using the 25th Amendment to remove Trump as unfit for office. Rosenstein said the story is “inaccurate and factually incorrect.”

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AP NewsBreak: DHS secretary says FEMA chief won’t lose job

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the federal disaster response agency used government vehicles without proper authorization, but will not lose his job over it, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Friday.

Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator William “Brock” Long had been under investigation by the Homeland Security Department’s watchdog over possibly misusing government vehicles to travel to his home in Hickory, North Carolina. Word leaked of the investigation just as Hurricane Florence was poised to make landfall earlier this month.

Nielsen said in a statement Friday that there had been a longstanding practice to transport FEMA administrators in government vehicles to ensure they could remain connected during a crisis. But despite this practice, use of government vehicles for home-to-work travel was not officially authorized, and that practice was eliminated in April.

Nielsen said the report by Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General also found Long used government vehicles for non-official reasons.

She said they spoke about the problems and Long agreed to reimburse the government, though it wasn’t clear how much money that might be. She said she directed the department to review policy on home-to-work transportation problems, assess communication requirements at FEMA so officials can be best connected during disasters, and to review of and training regarding proper use of government vehicles.

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When will it end? Florence’s floodwaters rising in Carolinas

GALIVANTS FERRY, S.C. (AP) — With muddy river water still washing over entire communities on Friday, eight days after Hurricane Florence slammed into land with nearly 3 feet of rain, new evacuation orders forced residents to flee to higher ground amid a sprawling disaster that’s beginning to feel like it will never end.

At least 43 people have died, included an elderly man whose body was found in a submerged pickup truck in South Carolina, and hundreds were forced from their homes as rivers kept swelling higher.

Leaders in the Carolinas warned residents not to get complacent, warning additional horrors lie ahead before things get much better.

“Although the winds are gone and the rain is not falling, the water is still there and the worst is still to come,” said South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster.

Speaking in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump said South Carolina is in for a “tough one” as flood waters keep rising.

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Sheriff: Shooter had mental illness but legally owned gun

ABERDEEN, Md. (AP) — The woman who killed three people and wounded others before shooting herself to death at a Maryland drugstore warehouse had been diagnosed with a mental illness and used a legally purchased gun in the rampage, a law enforcement official said Friday.

Harford County Sheriff Jeffrey Gahler told news reporters Friday that the suspect, 26-year-old Snochia Moseley of Baltimore County, had been diagnosed with a mental illness in 2016. “That’s as far as I’ll go with it,” he said, declining to give any more details about the illness.

He said Moseley had become increasingly agitated in recent weeks, and relatives had been concerned for her well-being.

Gahler said she used a handgun that she legally purchased in March to fire a total of 13 rounds Thursday morning and died after shooting herself in the head.

Gahler identified the three people Moseley fatally shot as Sunday Aguda, a 45-year-old man from Baltimore County; Hayleen Reyes, a 41-year-old woman from Baltimore; and Brindra Giri, a 41-year-old woman from Baltimore County.

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APNewsBreak: Army misses 2018 recruiting goal

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time since 2005, the U.S. Army missed its recruiting goal this year, falling short by about 6,500 soldiers, despite pouring an extra $200 million into bonuses and approving some additional waivers for bad conduct or health issues.

Army leaders said they signed up about 70,000 new active duty recruits in the fiscal year that ends Sept. 30 — well below the 76,500 they needed. The Army National Guard and Army Reserves also fell far short of their goals, by more than 12,000 and 5,000 respectively. The Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, meanwhile, all met their recruiting goals for 2018.

The Army’s shortfall, said Maj. Gen. Joe Calloway, was fueled by the strong American economy and increased competition from private sector employers who can pay more. But the failure has triggered an overhaul in Army recruiting, including an increase in recruiters, expanded marketing and a new effort to reach out to young, potential recruits through popular online gaming.

“We obviously thought we would do better than that,” said Calloway, director of military personnel management for the Army, when asked about the recruiting gap in an Associated Press interview. He said there were several thousand permanent legal residents seeking to enlist, but they did not get through the screening process in time. And, he said that in the last three years Army recruiters have brought in 3,000-5,000 more enlistees than planned during the last three months of the fiscal year.

“There was hope that they would be able to do the same thing this year,” he said. “That did not pan out.”

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Is $1,100 too much for an iPhone? Get an older one for less

NEW YORK (AP) — The $1,100 price tag on Apple’s latest iPhone turned heads when the company announced it last week. But for less than half as much, you can still get a good camera, a decent-sized screen and other popular features.

Just buy a two-year-old iPhone 7.

That phone was Apple’s first to come with water resistance and its first to lose the standard headphone jack. Its 4.7-inch screen is adequate and on par with other smartphones, even though its resolution falls short of high definition. And the phone still has a fingerprint sensor and a home button, both of which have vanished in the latest iPhones.

Or, if you want to pay more for wireless charging, there’s the iPhone 8. An edge-to-edge screen? You’ll need the upcoming budget iPhone XR or one of its more expensive siblings. And if you want a supersized display, that’s where the $1,100 iPhone XS Max comes in. That model and a smaller version start selling in the U.S. and several other countries on Friday.

If you’re shopping for a new phone, it pays to think hard about what you really want and what you’re willing to pay for it. Improvements over the previous generation tend to be incremental, but can add up over time — and so do the sums you’ll pay for them.

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Tiger Woods shares lead going into weekend at East Lake

ATLANTA (AP) — For thousands of fans crammed into every corner of East Lake, it looked as though Tiger Woods was closer than ever to capping off this remarkable comeback season by winning the final PGA Tour event.

Four straight one-putts on the back nine Friday in the Tour Championship — three for birdie, one for par — offset a double bogey and gave Woods a 2-under 68 and a share of the 36-hole lead for the first time in three years. Not since Doral in 2013 has he been atop the leaderboard after each of the first two rounds.

Woods sees it differently.

He’s the one coping with Bermuda rough deep enough to hide all but the top of a golf ball, with greens that are slick and firm and with a golf course that is the most demanding test players have seen this side of a major.

“We have a long way to go,” Woods said. “And this is not an easy golf course.”

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Jane Fonda, her life and men star in a revealing documentary

LOS ANGELES (AP) — As beguiling and powerful as Jane Fonda is onscreen, she has yet to play a role that’s a match for her whiplash-inducing life of artistry, celebrity and polarizing activism. Then there’s the personal drama, including serial marriages to three very different husbands with their own claims to fame.

When the 80-year-old Fonda decided to participate in a documentary about her — “Why not? I don’t know how much longer I’m gonna live” — it was with award-winning filmmaker Susan Lacy, who made an intriguing choice: using the men in Fonda’s life as the organizing principle for “Jane Fonda in Five Acts.”

The film, debuting from 8 to 10:15 p.m. Monday EDT on HBO, devotes its first chapter to Fonda’s fraught bond with her emotionally reserved dad, the acclaimed actor Henry Fonda. It was at the end of his life that she managed to draw him closer: They starred opposite each other as an estranged father and daughter in the film “On Golden Pond.”

The 1982 Academy Award ceremony at which Henry Fonda won his only Oscar is what Jane Fonda readily points to when asked to name a Hollywood career highlight. Her father died four months later.

“The fact that it was with this movie, and he asked me to receive it (the award) if he won,” Fonda said in an interview, her steady, blue-eyed gaze reminiscent of her father. “It’s rare that a child gets a chance to do something like this for a parent with whom they have had such a complicated relationship.”

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