Today in History: June 30

American film star Clark Gable (1901-1960) reading the novel 'Gone With the Wind' by Margaret Mitchell. His greatest role was that of Rhett Butler in the MGM film adaption of the book.   (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

In 1936, the Civil War novel “Gone with the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell was first published by The Macmillan Co. in New York.

In this 1939 photo, American film star Clark Gable reads the novel ‘Gone With the Wind’ by Margaret Mitchell. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

John F. Kennedy, Pope Paul VI

In 1963, Pope Paul VI was crowned the 262nd head of the Roman Catholic Church.

President John F. Kennedy and Pope Paul VI talk at the Vatican in this 1963 file photo. (AP Photo/File)

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, JUNE 20, 2016 AND THEREAFTER -FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1966 file photo, Betty Friedan, author of "The Feminine Mystique," speaks to a group in New York. The feminist is the founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW), which works for women's rights. (AP Photo/File)

In 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in Washington, D.C.

In this 1966 file photo, Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” speaks to a group in New York. The feminist is the founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW). (AP Photo/File)

This photo provided by General Motors Co. shows the 2017 Chevrolet Corvette, which in its automatic transmission version, ranks No. 3 in the Made in America Auto Index and is an Edmunds pick for a performance car and a convertible. The Corvette has 82 percent domestic content and is built in Bowling Green, Ky. (Courtesy of General Motors Co. via AP)
In 1953, the first Chevrolet Corvette, with its innovative fiberglass body, was built at a General Motors assembly facility in Flint, Michigan.

This photo provided by General Motors Co. shows the 2017 Chevrolet Corvette, which in its automatic transmission version, ranks No. 3 in the Made in America Auto Index and is an Edmunds pick for a performance car and a convertible. The Corvette has 82 percent domestic content and is built in Bowling Green, Ky. (Courtesy of General Motors Co. via AP)

FILE - In this June 30, 2013, file photo, the Yarnell Hill Fire burns in Glenn Ilah near Yarnell, Ariz. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey plans to dedicate a long-awaited memorial for the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots who perished in a wildfire three years ago. Ducey will be joined by family members of the fallen firefighters on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, at a private dedication of the Granite Mountain Hotshots Memorial State Park. (David Kadlubowski/The Arizona Republic via AP)
In 2013, 19 elite firefighters known as members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were killed battling a wildfire northwest of Phoenix after a change in wind direction pushed the flames back toward their position.

FILE – In this June 30, 2013, file photo, the Yarnell Hill Fire burns in Glenn Ilah near Yarnell, Ariz. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey plans to dedicate a long-awaited memorial for the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots who perished in a wildfire three years ago. Ducey will be joined by family members of the fallen firefighters on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, at a private dedication of the Granite Mountain Hotshots Memorial State Park. (David Kadlubowski/The Arizona Republic via AP)

Adolph Hitler
In 1934, Adolf Hitler launched his “blood purge” of political and military rivals in Germany in what came to be known as “The Night of the Long Knives.”

FILE – In this Dec. 5, 1931 file photo, Adolf Hitler, leader of the National Socialists, is saluted as he leaves the party’s Munich headquarters. The book, “Human Rights After Hitler” by British academic Dan Plesch, says Hitler was put on the United Nations War Crimes Commission’s first list of war criminals in December 1944, but only after extensive debate and formal charges brought by Czechoslovakia. Plesch, who led the campaign for open access to the commission’s archive, told The Associated Press on Tuesday, April 18, 2017, that the documents show “the allies were prepared to indict Hitler as head of state, and this overturns a large part of what we thought we knew about him.”

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American film star Clark Gable (1901-1960) reading the novel 'Gone With the Wind' by Margaret Mitchell. His greatest role was that of Rhett Butler in the MGM film adaption of the book.   (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
John F. Kennedy, Pope Paul VI
ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, JUNE 20, 2016 AND THEREAFTER -FILE - In this Nov. 21, 1966 file photo, Betty Friedan, author of "The Feminine Mystique," speaks to a group in New York. The feminist is the founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW), which works for women's rights. (AP Photo/File)
This photo provided by General Motors Co. shows the 2017 Chevrolet Corvette, which in its automatic transmission version, ranks No. 3 in the Made in America Auto Index and is an Edmunds pick for a performance car and a convertible. The Corvette has 82 percent domestic content and is built in Bowling Green, Ky. (Courtesy of General Motors Co. via AP)
FILE - In this June 30, 2013, file photo, the Yarnell Hill Fire burns in Glenn Ilah near Yarnell, Ariz. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey plans to dedicate a long-awaited memorial for the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots who perished in a wildfire three years ago. Ducey will be joined by family members of the fallen firefighters on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, at a private dedication of the Granite Mountain Hotshots Memorial State Park. (David Kadlubowski/The Arizona Republic via AP)
Adolph Hitler

Today is Sunday, June 30, the 181st day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 30, 1936, the Civil War novel “Gone with the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell was first published by The Macmillan Co. in New York.

On this date:

In 1865, eight people, including Mary Surratt and Dr. Samuel Mudd, were convicted by a military commission of conspiring with John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. (Four defendants, including Surratt, were executed; Mudd was sentenced to life in prison, but was pardoned by President Andrew Johnson in 1869.)

In 1918, labor activist and socialist Eugene V. Debs was arrested in Cleveland, charged under the Espionage Act of 1917 for a speech he’d made two weeks earlier denouncing U.S. involvement in World War I. (Debs was sentenced to prison and disenfranchised for life.)

In 1934, Adolf Hitler launched his “blood purge” of political and military rivals in Germany in what came to be known as “The Night of the Long Knives.”

In 1953, the first Chevrolet Corvette, with its innovative fiberglass body, was built at a General Motors assembly facility in Flint, Michigan.

In 1963, Pope Paul VI was crowned the 262nd head of the Roman Catholic Church.

In 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in Washington, D.C.

In 1971, the Supreme Court ruled, 6-3, that the government could not prevent The New York Times or The Washington Post from publishing the Pentagon Papers. A Soviet space mission ended in tragedy when three cosmonauts aboard Soyuz 11 were found dead of asphyxiation inside their capsule after it had returned to Earth.

In 1977, President Jimmy Carter announced he had decided against production of the Rockwell B-1 bomber, saying it was too costly. (However, the B-1 was later revived by President Ronald Reagan.)

In 1982, the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution expired, having failed to receive the required number of ratifications for its adoption, despite having its seven-year deadline extended by three years.

In 1985, 39 American hostages from a hijacked TWA jetliner were freed in Beirut after being held 17 days.

In 1997, the Union Jack was lowered for the last time over Government House in Hong Kong as Britain prepared to hand the colony back to China at midnight after ruling it for 156 years.

In 2013, 19 elite firefighters known as members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were killed battling a wildfire northwest of Phoenix after a change in wind direction pushed the flames back toward their position.

Ten years ago: Democrat Al Franken was declared the winner of Minnesota’s eight-month U.S. Senate vote recount, defeating Republican incumbent Norm Coleman. A Yemeni jet with 153 people on board crashed into the Indian Ocean as it tried to land on the island nation of Comoros; a 12-year-old girl was the sole survivor. American soldier Pfc. Bowe R. Bergdahl went missing from his base in eastern Afghanistan, and was later confirmed to have been captured by insurgents. (Bergdahl was released on May 31, 2014 in exchange for five Taliban detainees.)

Five years ago: A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled that some companies with religious objections could avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, the first time the high court declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law. President Obama tapped former Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald to take over the troubled Veterans Affairs Department. The Israeli military found the bodies of three missing teenagers just over two weeks after they were abducted in the occupied West Bank, allegedly by Hamas militants. Writer, actor, producer and director Paul Mazursky, 84, died in Los Angeles. Actor Bob Hastings, 89, died in Burbank, California.

One year ago: Hundreds of thousands of people gathered for rallies and marches in hundreds of locations around the country, demanding an end to the separation of immigrant families who cross into the United States.

Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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