Today in History: Oct. 25

People view weapons near a portrait of King George III in the "Peace, Liberty, and Independence": 225 Years After the Treaty of Paris exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008.  The new exhibit tracks the course of the second-longest conflict in U.S. history the American Revolutionary War and the ways art helped rally support for independence from the British and promote the values of the emerging republic. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
On Oct. 25, 1760, Britain’s King George III succeeded his late grandfather, George II. People view weapons near a portrait of King George III in the “Peace, Liberty, and Independence”: 225 Years After the Treaty of Paris exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008. The new exhibit tracks the course of the second-longest conflict in U.S. history the American Revolutionary War and the ways art helped rally support for independence from the British and promote the values of the emerging republic. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Matt Rourke)
Illustration of the charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava during the Crimean War.  (Photo by Time Life Pictures/Mansell/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
In 1854, the “Charge of the Light Brigade” took place during the Crimean War as an English brigade of more than 600 men charged the Russian army, suffering heavy losses. (Photo by Time Life Pictures/Mansell/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) (The LIFE Picture Collection/Gett/Time Life Pictures)
Performers show their skills during the National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. Taiwan's independence-leaning government will defend the self-governing island's freedoms and democratic system amid heightened tensions with rival China, President Tsai Ing-wen said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In 1945, Taiwan became independent of Japanese colonial rule. In this AP photo, performers show their skills during the National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. Taiwan’s independence-leaning government will defend the self-governing island’s freedoms and democratic system amid heightened tensions with rival China, President Tsai Ing-wen said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying) (AP/Chiang Ying-ying)
File-This 1945 file photo shows General Dwight D. Eisenhower in uniform. The plain green telephone Eisenhower used at his summer residence in Rhode Island has sold at auction.
The Newport Daily News reports that the phone with no numbers or dial was sold earlier this month by Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers of Cranston for $1,375. The telephone was Eisenhower’s personal telephone at the “Summer White House” in Newport. (AP Photo/File)
In 1954, a meeting of President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Cabinet was carried live on radio and television. (AP)
Cuban militiamen stand at battle stations on Havana's shoreline as the U.S. and the Soviet Union teeter on the brink of nuclear war over the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba in October, 1962. The missiles are withdrawn after President John F. Kennedy (1917 - 1963) gives assurances to Soviet leader Nikita Krushchev (1894 - 1971) that the U.S. will not invade Cuba. (Photo by Alan Oxley/Getty Images)
In 1962, during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council, U.S. Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson II demanded that Soviet Ambassador Valerian Zorin confirm or deny the existence of Soviet-built missile bases in Cuba, saying he was prepared to wait “until hell freezes over” for an answer; Stevenson then presented photographic evidence of the bases to the Council. (Photo by Alan Oxley/Getty Images) (Getty Images/Alan Oxley)
rolling stones
In 1964, The Rolling Stones made the first of six appearances on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” (AP photo)
American soldiers guarding suspected members of the People's Revolutionary Army of Grenada during the US OP Urgent Fury invasion of the island feared a Cuban/Soviet military threat in the Caribbean after a Marxist coup.  (Photo by Matthew Naythons/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
In 1983, a U.S.-led force invaded Grenada at the order of President Ronald Reagan, who said the action was needed to protect U.S. citizens there. (Photo by Matthew Naythons/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images) (The LIFE Images Collection/Getty/Matthew Naythons)
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People view weapons near a portrait of King George III in the "Peace, Liberty, and Independence": 225 Years After the Treaty of Paris exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008.  The new exhibit tracks the course of the second-longest conflict in U.S. history the American Revolutionary War and the ways art helped rally support for independence from the British and promote the values of the emerging republic. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Illustration of the charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava during the Crimean War.  (Photo by Time Life Pictures/Mansell/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
Performers show their skills during the National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. Taiwan's independence-leaning government will defend the self-governing island's freedoms and democratic system amid heightened tensions with rival China, President Tsai Ing-wen said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
File-This 1945 file photo shows General Dwight D. Eisenhower in uniform. The plain green telephone Eisenhower used at his summer residence in Rhode Island has sold at auction.
The Newport Daily News reports that the phone with no numbers or dial was sold earlier this month by Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers of Cranston for $1,375. The telephone was Eisenhower’s personal telephone at the “Summer White House” in Newport. (AP Photo/File)
Cuban militiamen stand at battle stations on Havana's shoreline as the U.S. and the Soviet Union teeter on the brink of nuclear war over the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba in October, 1962. The missiles are withdrawn after President John F. Kennedy (1917 - 1963) gives assurances to Soviet leader Nikita Krushchev (1894 - 1971) that the U.S. will not invade Cuba. (Photo by Alan Oxley/Getty Images)
rolling stones
American soldiers guarding suspected members of the People's Revolutionary Army of Grenada during the US OP Urgent Fury invasion of the island feared a Cuban/Soviet military threat in the Caribbean after a Marxist coup.  (Photo by Matthew Naythons/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)

Today is Friday, Oct. 25, the 298th day of 2019. There are 67 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 25, 1971, the U.N. General Assembly voted to admit mainland China and expel Taiwan.

On this date:

In 1760, Britain’s King George III succeeded his late grandfather, George II.

In 1812, the frigate USS United States, commanded by Stephen Decatur, captured the British vessel HMS Macedonian during the War of 1812.

In 1854, the “Charge of the Light Brigade” took place during the Crimean War as an English brigade of more than 600 men charged the Russian army, suffering heavy losses.

In 1910, “America the Beautiful,” with words by Katharine Lee Bates and music by Samuel A. Ward, was first published.

In 1954, a meeting of President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Cabinet was carried live on radio and television.

In 1962, during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council, U.S. Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson II demanded that Soviet Ambassador Valerian Zorin confirm or deny the existence of Soviet-built missile bases in Cuba; Stevenson then presented photographic evidence of the bases to the Council.

In 1964, The Rolling Stones made the first of six appearances on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”

In 1983, a U.S.-led force invaded Grenada (greh-NAY’-duh) at the order of President Ronald Reagan, who said the action was needed to protect U.S. citizens there.

In 1994, Susan Smith of Union, South Carolina, claimed that a black carjacker had driven off with her two young sons (Smith later confessed to drowning the children in John D. Long Lake, and was convicted of murder). Three defendants were convicted in South Africa of murdering American exchange student Amy Biehl. (In 1998, all three were granted amnesty by South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission.)

In 1999, golfer Payne Stewart and five others were killed when their Learjet flew uncontrolled for four hours before crashing in South Dakota; Stewart was 42.

In 2001, a day after the House signed on, the Senate sent President Bush the U-S-A Patriot Act, a package of anti-terror measures giving police sweeping new powers to search people’s homes and business records secretly and to eavesdrop on telephone and computer conversations.

In 2002, U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., was killed in a plane crash in northern Minnesota along with his wife, daughter and five others, a week and a-half before the election. Actor Richard Harris died in London at age 72.

Ten years ago: A pair of suicide car bombings devastated the heart of Iraq’s capital, Baghdad, killing 155 people, including 24 children. Philanthropist Jeffry Picower, accused of making more than $7 billion from the investment schemes of his longtime friend Bernard Madoff, drowned after suffering a heart attack in the swimming pool of his Palm Beach, Florida, mansion; he was 67. The New York Yankees won their first pennant in six years, beating the Los Angeles Angels 5-2 in Game 6 of the AL championship series.

Five years ago: The World Health Organization said more than 10,000 people had been infected with Ebola and that nearly half of them had died as the outbreak continued
to spread. Jack Bruce, 71, the bassist and lead vocalist of the 1960s power trio Cream, died in London. The San Francisco Giants defeated the Kansas City Royals, 11-4, to even the World Series at two games each.

One year ago: Investigators searched coast-to-coast for the culprit behind the mail-bomb plot aimed at critics of President Donald Trump as three more devices were linked to the plot – two addressed to former Vice President Joe Biden and one to actor Robert De Niro.

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© 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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