Today in History: Oct. 18

In this Friday, April 15, 2011, photo  in Newark Del., shown is a post marking the base point in the survey of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon.  Mason and Dixon began their survey a century before the Civil War to settle a border dispute between Pennsylvania and Maryland.  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
In 1767, the Mason-Dixon line, the boundary between colonial Pennsylvania and Maryland, was set as astronomers Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon completed their survey. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Matt Rourke)
Thomas A. Edison poses with the the tin-foil phonograph, which he exhibited at the National Academy of Science in Washington and later demonstrated for the president at the White House, on April 18, 1878.  The phonograph, Edison's favorite invention, was invented on Aug. 12, 1877.  (AP Photo)
In 1931, inventor Thomas Alva Edison died in West Orange, New Jersey, at age 84. (AP Photo) (AP)
Priscilla Piestewa, right, mother of Army Spc. Lori Piestewa, hugs an unidentified woman during the Women in Military Service Memorial, Monday, May 26, 2003, at Arlington Cemetery in Arlington, Va. The memorial honored Spc. Piestewa, a Native American servicewomen who died during the Iraq war, and unveiled a new exhibit. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson)
In 1997, a monument honoring American servicewomen, past and present, was dedicated at Arlington National Cemetery. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson) (AP/LAWRENCE JACKSON)
baltimore maryland
In 1867, The cornerstone was laid for Baltimore City Hall. (Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/modeh90)
FILE - In this Oct. 16, 1968 file photo, extending gloved hands skyward in a Black power salute as a form of racial protest, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward during the playing of national anthem after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City. While the games were marked by dissent, today's situation in Mexico is much more chaotic with a government that is barely in control of many aspects of society, battered by violent drug cartels that are often supported by rogue cops and mayors. (AP Photo, File)
In 1968, the U-S Olympic Committee suspended Tommie Smith and John Carlos for giving a “black power” salute as a protest during a victory ceremony in Mexico City. FILE – In this Oct. 16, 1968 file photo, extending gloved hands skyward in a Black power salute as a form of racial protest, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward during the playing of national anthem after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City. While the games were marked by dissent, today’s situation in Mexico is much more chaotic with a government that is barely in control of many aspects of society, battered by violent drug cartels that are often supported by rogue cops and mayors. (AP Photo, File) (AP/STF)
iStock/Thinkstock
In 1898, the American flag was raised in Puerto Rico shortly before Spain formally relinquished control of the island to the U.S. (iStock/Thinkstock) (Getty Images/iStockphoto/cestes001)
Sen. Harry S. Truman, Democratic vice presidential candidate, and Mrs. Bess Truman cast their vote Independence, Mo., on Nov. 7, 1944. (AP Photo)
In 1982, former first lady Bess Truman died at her home in Independence, Missouri, at age 97. Sen. Harry S. Truman, Democratic vice presidential candidate, and Mrs. Bess Truman cast their vote Independence, Mo., on Nov. 7, 1944. (AP Photo) (AP)
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In this Friday, April 15, 2011, photo  in Newark Del., shown is a post marking the base point in the survey of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon.  Mason and Dixon began their survey a century before the Civil War to settle a border dispute between Pennsylvania and Maryland.  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Thomas A. Edison poses with the the tin-foil phonograph, which he exhibited at the National Academy of Science in Washington and later demonstrated for the president at the White House, on April 18, 1878.  The phonograph, Edison's favorite invention, was invented on Aug. 12, 1877.  (AP Photo)
Priscilla Piestewa, right, mother of Army Spc. Lori Piestewa, hugs an unidentified woman during the Women in Military Service Memorial, Monday, May 26, 2003, at Arlington Cemetery in Arlington, Va. The memorial honored Spc. Piestewa, a Native American servicewomen who died during the Iraq war, and unveiled a new exhibit. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson)
baltimore maryland
FILE - In this Oct. 16, 1968 file photo, extending gloved hands skyward in a Black power salute as a form of racial protest, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward during the playing of national anthem after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City. While the games were marked by dissent, today's situation in Mexico is much more chaotic with a government that is barely in control of many aspects of society, battered by violent drug cartels that are often supported by rogue cops and mayors. (AP Photo, File)
iStock/Thinkstock
Sen. Harry S. Truman, Democratic vice presidential candidate, and Mrs. Bess Truman cast their vote Independence, Mo., on Nov. 7, 1944. (AP Photo)

Today is Thursday, Oct. 18, the 291st day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 18, 1892, the first long-distance telephone line between New York and Chicago was officially opened (it could only handle one call at a time).

On this date:

In 1648, Boston shoemakers were authorized to form a guild to protect their interests; it’s the first American labor organization on record.

In 1767, the Mason-Dixon line, the boundary between colonial Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware, was set as astronomers Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon completed their survey.

In 1898, the American flag was raised in Puerto Rico shortly before Spain formally relinquished control of the island to the U-S.

In 1931, inventor Thomas Alva Edison died in West Orange, New Jersey, at age 84.

In 1944, Soviet troops invaded Czechoslovakia during World War II.

In 1962, James D. Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins were honored with the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology for determining the double-helix molecular structure of DNA.

In 1968, the U-S Olympic Committee suspended Tommie Smith and John Carlos for giving a “black power” salute as a protest during a victory ceremony in Mexico City.

In 1969, the federal government banned artificial sweeteners known as cyclamates (SY’-kluh-maytz) because of evidence they caused cancer in laboratory rats.

In 1977, West German commandos stormed a hijacked Lufthansa jetliner on the ground in Mogadishu, Somalia, freeing all 86 hostages and killing three of the four hijackers.

In 1982, former first lady Bess Truman died at her home in Independence, Missouri, at age 97.

In 1997, a monument honoring American servicewomen, past and present, was dedicated at Arlington National Cemetery.

In 2001, CBS News announced that an employee in anchorman Dan Rather’s office had tested positive for skin anthrax. Four disciples of Osama bin Laden were sentenced in New York to life without parole for their roles in the deadly 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush, speaking at Camp David, said he would host an international summit in response to the global financial crisis, but did not set a date or place for the meeting. Anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr urged Iraq’s parliament to reject a pact that would extend U.S. presence in Iraq for three years. Soul singer Dee Dee Warwick died in Essex County, N.J. at age 63.

Five years ago: People in the San Francisco Bay area faced a frustrating Friday commute as workers for the region’s largest transit system walked off the job for the second time in four months. President Barack Obama nominated the Pentagon’s former top lawyer, Jeh (jay) C. Johnson, to be the next Secretary of Homeland Security. In a stunning about-face, Saudi Arabia rejected a coveted seat on the U.N. Security Council, denouncing the body for failing to resolve world conflicts such as Syria’s civil war. The St. Louis Cardinals advanced to their second World Series in three seasons by roughing up the Los Angeles Dodgers 9-0 in Game 6 of the NL championship series.

One year ago: President Donald Trump rejected claims that he had been disrespectful to the grieving family of a slain U.S. soldier in a phone call to the family. Instead of accepting awards at the CMT Artists of the Year show in Nashville, singer Jason Aldean and other stars honored the victims of the mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas. At a meeting of NFL owners in New York, Commissioner Roger Goodell said there was no discussion of changing the league’s national anthem policy to require players to stand. After a day of modest gains on Wall Street, the Dow industrials finished above 23,000 for the first time.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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