Today in History: Oct. 23

A line of women rally for women's suffrage and advertise a free rally discussing women's right to vote in Washington D.C. on Oct. 3, 1915.  (AP Photo)
In 1915, tens of thousands of women paraded up Fifth Avenue in New York City, demanding the right to vote. This photo was taken on Oct. 3, 1915 in D.C. as women rallied for women’s suffrage. (AP Photo) (AP)
Landing barges loaded with U.S. troops are bound for the beaches of Leyte island, in October 1944, as American and Japanese fighter planes duel to the death overhead. The men aboard the crafts watch the dramatic battle in the sky as they approach the shore. (AP Photo)
In 1944, the World War II Battle of Leyte (LAY’-tee) Gulf began, resulting in a major Allied victory against Japanese forces. Landing barges loaded with U.S. troops are bound for the beaches of Leyte island, in October 1944, as American and Japanese fighter planes duel to the death overhead. The men aboard the crafts watch the dramatic battle in the sky as they approach the shore. (AP Photo) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Oma Sharif
In 1958, Boris Pasternak was named winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. (However, Soviet authorities pressured Pasternak into relinquishing the award.) FILE- This November, 1965 file photo from Metro Goldwyn-Mayer shows actor Omar Sharif, in the movie based on Boris Pasternak’ s Doctor Zhivago location unknown. Sharif has died in a Cairo hospital of a heart attack, his agent said on Friday, July 10, 2015. (MGM via AP) (AP)
RICHARD NIXON
In 1973, President Richard Nixon agreed to turn over White House tape recordings subpoenaed by the Watergate special prosecutor to Judge John J. Sirica. In this Feb. 16, 1969, file photo, President Richard M. Nixon, is shown at his desk in the White House. For the first time since an Oval Office taping system was removed by Nixon’s chief of staff nearly 44 years ago, a president has hinted that White House conversations might again be secretly recorded. If so, President Donald Trump is following a problematic precedent. While several presidents secretly recorded conversations without problems, the practice is most associated with Nixon. His recordings became prime evidence during the Watergate investigation that ultimately led to his resignation. Sooner or later, recordings are likely to become public.(AP Photo/File)
U.S. Marine and Navy pallbearers remove the coffin of one of the American staffers killed in the U.S. Embassy bomb blast in Beirut, from a hearse, April 23, 1983.  A Marine and Navy honor guard stands at attention as the bodies were then loaded on a C-141 transport plane bound for Washington.  Color guard and tail of plane are seen in the background.  (AP Photo/Zuheir Saade)
In 1983, 241 U.S. service members, most of them Marines, were killed in a suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International Airport in Lebanon; a near-simultaneous attack on French forces killed 58 paratroopers. In U.S. Marine and Navy pallbearers remove the coffin of one of the American staffers killed in the U.S. Embassy bomb blast in Beirut, from a hearse, April 23, 1983. A Marine and Navy honor guard stands at attention as the bodies were then loaded on a C-141 transport plane bound for Washington. Color guard and tail of plane are seen in the background. (AP Photo/Zuheir Saade) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/Zuheir Saade)
Former Enron executive Jeffrey Skilling arrives at the federal courthouse for the start of the 13th week of his fraud and conspiracy trial Monday, April 24, 2006, in Houston.  (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
In 2006, former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling was sentenced by a federal judge in Houston to 24 years, four months for his role in the company’s collapse. Eventually 10 years was cut off Skilling’s prison sentence, and he was released to a halfway house in Aug. 2018. In this photo, former Enron executive Jeffrey Skilling arrives at the federal courthouse for the start of the 13th week of his fraud and conspiracy trial Monday, April 24, 2006, in Houston. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan) (ASSOCIATED PRESS/PAT SULLIVAN)
This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling "cultures of the now infamous 'Ames' strain of Bacillus anthracis" at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn't take a position on the FBI's conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins' co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo)
In 2001, the nation’s anthrax scare hit the White House with the discovery of a small concentration of spores at an offsite mail processing center. This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling “cultures of the now infamous ‘Ames’ strain of Bacillus anthracis” at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn’t take a position on the FBI’s conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins’ co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo) (AP)
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A line of women rally for women's suffrage and advertise a free rally discussing women's right to vote in Washington D.C. on Oct. 3, 1915.  (AP Photo)
Landing barges loaded with U.S. troops are bound for the beaches of Leyte island, in October 1944, as American and Japanese fighter planes duel to the death overhead. The men aboard the crafts watch the dramatic battle in the sky as they approach the shore. (AP Photo)
Oma Sharif
RICHARD NIXON
U.S. Marine and Navy pallbearers remove the coffin of one of the American staffers killed in the U.S. Embassy bomb blast in Beirut, from a hearse, April 23, 1983.  A Marine and Navy honor guard stands at attention as the bodies were then loaded on a C-141 transport plane bound for Washington.  Color guard and tail of plane are seen in the background.  (AP Photo/Zuheir Saade)
Former Enron executive Jeffrey Skilling arrives at the federal courthouse for the start of the 13th week of his fraud and conspiracy trial Monday, April 24, 2006, in Houston.  (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
This undated image attached to an email sent Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2001 by Bruce Ivins shows Ivins handling "cultures of the now infamous 'Ames' strain of Bacillus anthracis" at his lab according to the text of the message. The Government Accountability Office says the science the FBI used to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks was flawed. The GAO released a report Friday on its findings. The agency didn't take a position on the FBI's conclusion that Army biodefense researcher Bruce Ivins acted alone in making and sending the powdered spores that killed five people and sickened 17 others. The report adds fuel to the debate among experts, including many of Ivins' co-workers at Fort Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, over whether Ivins could have made and mailed the anthrax-filled envelopes. (AP Photo)

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 23, the 296th day of 2018. There are 69 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 23, 1983, 241 U.S. service members, most of them Marines, were killed in a suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International Airport in Lebanon; a near-simultaneous attack on French forces killed 58 paratroopers.

On this date:

In 1707, the first Parliament of Great Britain, created by the Acts of Union between England and Scotland, held its first meeting.

In 1915, tens of thousands of women paraded up Fifth Avenue in New York City, demanding the right to vote.

In 1942, during World War II, Britain launched a major offensive against Axis forces at El Alamein (el ah-lah-MAYN’) in Egypt, resulting in an Allied victory.

In 1944, the World War II Battle of Leyte (LAY’-tee) Gulf began, resulting in a major Allied victory against Japanese forces.

In 1956, a student-sparked revolt against Hungary’s Communist rule began; as the revolution spread, Soviet forces started entering the country, and the uprising was put down within weeks.

In 1958, Boris Pasternak was named winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. (However, Soviet authorities pressured Pasternak into relinquishing the award.)

In 1973, President Richard Nixon agreed to turn over White House tape recordings subpoenaed by the Watergate special prosecutor to Judge John J. Sirica.

In 1987, the U.S. Senate rejected, 58-42, the Supreme Court nomination of Robert H. Bork.

In 1991, Cambodia’s warring factions and representatives of 18 other nations signed a peace treaty in Paris.

In 1995, a jury in Houston convicted Yolanda Saldivar of murdering Tejano singing star Selena. (Saldivar is serving a life prison sentence.)

In 2001, the nation’s anthrax scare hit the White House with the discovery of a small concentration of spores at an offsite mail processing center.

In 2006, former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling was sentenced by a federal judge in Houston to 24 years, four months for his role in the company’s collapse. Eventually 10 years was cut off Skilling’s prison sentence, and he was released to a halfway house in Aug. 2018.

Ten years ago: Badgered by lawmakers on the House Oversight Committee, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan denied the nation’s economic crisis was his fault but conceded the meltdown had revealed a flaw in a lifetime of economic thinking and left him in a “state of shocked disbelief.” The Tampa Bay Rays evened the World Series at one game apiece by beating the Philadelphia Phillies, 4-2.

Five years ago: A defensive Obama administration acknowledged its problem-plagued health insurance website didn’t get enough testing before going live; it said technicians were deep into the job of fixing major computer snags, but provided no timetable. German Chancellor Angela Merkel called President Barack Obama to complain about allegations U.S. intelligence had targeted her cellphone. (The White House said it wasn’t monitoring and wouldn’t monitor Merkel’s communications, but conspicuously didn’t say they had never been monitored.) The Boston Red Sox took the World Series opener, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 8-1.

One year ago: New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced a civil rights investigation into the Weinstein Co., amid sexual harassment and assault allegations against its founder, Harvey Weinstein. As Republicans searched for ways to finance tax cuts, President Donald Trump promised that the popular 401(k) retirement savings program would not be touched. Sen. John McCain said he didn’t consider Donald Trump to be a draft-dodger, but told ABC’s “The View” that the system that allowed Trump and other wealthy Americans to use medical deferments to avoid military service during the Vietnam War was wrong.

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© 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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